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I have an array wich is structured like this

  • foo = stuff we don't care for this example
  • foo1_value
  • foo1_label
  • foo1_unit
  • foo2_value
  • foo3_label
  • foo3_value

Can you figure out a fast way to make it look like that ?

  • foo
  • foo1
    • value
    • label
    • unit
  • foo2
    • value
  • foo3
    • value
    • label

I'm actually trying with something like this :

array_walk($array, function($val, $key) use(&$nice_array) {
        $match = false;
        preg_match("/_label|_value|_unit|_libelle/", $key, $match);
        if (count($match)) {
            list($name, $subName) = explode('_', $key);
            $nice_array[$name][$subName] = $val;
        } else {
            $nice_array[$key] = $val;
        }
    });


    echo '<pre>';
    print_r($nice_array);
    echo '</pre>';

This is working I'll just have to reflect on the foo_foo_label thing and it's all good

  • What about date and date_modif? – Rocket Hazmat May 28 '14 at 14:51
  • If this isn't going to get too recursive it might be worth looking at the comments in the PHP documentation for preg_grep - especially on matching the keys : php.net/manual/en/function.preg-grep.php – CD001 May 28 '14 at 14:52
  • array_walk does not allow you to add, unset or change the order of the array – danjam May 28 '14 at 15:44
  • @danjam and it's quite normal. But as unseting all the values was fine I tought what if ... and no :( – Su4p May 28 '14 at 15:54
4

You could use explode on the array keys, something like this:

$newArray = array();
foreach ( $array as $key => $value )
{
    $parts = explode('_', $key);
    $newArray[$parts[0]][$parts[1]] = $value; 
}

Edit: update as detailed in comments. Will handle your foo_foo_value case as well as foo and foo_foo. There's really no reason to use array_walk if you're only passing the results off to a second array.

$newArray = array();
foreach ( $array as $key => $value ) {
  if ( preg_match('/_(label|value|unit)$/', $key) === 0 ) {
    $newArray[$key] = $value;
    continue;
  }
  $pos = strrpos($key, '_');
  $newArray[substr($key, 0, $pos)][substr($key, $pos+1, strlen($key))] = $value;
}
  • Note The array's keys must be in the following format: xxx_yyy. – Ofir Baruch May 28 '14 at 14:57
  • this was my intial tought but I think php has a more elegant way to deal with this – Su4p May 28 '14 at 14:57
  • @OfirBaruch Very true, just noticed OP has a key not in that format. – danjam May 28 '14 at 15:04
  • @Su4p do you want to disregard those elements entirely or must they stay the same? – danjam May 28 '14 at 15:04
  • @danjam the problem with this method is what if I have foo_foo_value. – Su4p May 28 '14 at 15:07
0

What you can do is loop over the array, and split (explode()) each key on _ to build your new array.

$newArray = array();
foreach($oldArray as $key=>$value){
    list($name, $subName) = explode('_', $key);

    if($subName !== NULL){
        if(!isset($newArray[$name])){
            $newArray[$name] = array();
        }
        $newArray[$name][$subName] = $value;
    }
    else{
        $newArray[$name] = $value;
    }
}
0
    $nice_array = array();
    array_walk($array, function($val, $key) use(&$nice_array) {
        $match = false;
        preg_match("/_label|_value|_unit|_libelle/", $key, $match);
        if (count($match)) {
            $tname = preg_split("/_label$|_value$|_unit$|_libelle$/",$key);
            $name = $tname[0];
            $subName = substr($match[0],1);
            $nice_array[$name][$subName] = $val;
        } else {
            $nice_array[$key] = $val;
        }
    });

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