3

Dumb question I get it..but what the difference between these two statements

if( null == this.someVariable)
{
 //do something
}

and 

if( this.someVariable == null )
{
//do something.
}
3
  • 6
    No difference. First one is C/C++ Yoda comparison style Commented May 28, 2014 at 15:33
  • 1
    No difference between these two statements is there Commented May 28, 2014 at 15:36
  • @Ballbin That statement is already an error in C#
    – NWard
    Commented May 28, 2014 at 15:42

3 Answers 3

5

They are the same from a code point of view. Some people prefer the first style, because if you then make a mistake and type = instead of == you'll get an error

3
  • 6
    no there is no such thing in c# try it yourself stop upvoting Commented May 28, 2014 at 15:36
  • @K.B: Yes, you are right. It's a habit from C++ programmers using C# ;)
    – MicroVirus
    Commented May 28, 2014 at 15:37
  • 3
    @K.B agree, with C# you just can't use assignment by mistake. Well, except if you trying to compare with true/false, which I think is odd Commented May 28, 2014 at 15:38
4

There's absolutely no difference at all. Except maybe which looks better to you.

It's a relic from the C\C++ world where:

if(null = someVariable)
{
}

Would give an error. But:

if(someVariable = null)
{
}

Would not.

3
  • Technically correct, but missing the reason why null == x is used. If you miss one of the =, it becomes an error.
    – ssube
    Commented May 28, 2014 at 15:36
  • @ssube that's not the reason. It's a relic from the C world.
    – i3arnon
    Commented May 28, 2014 at 15:37
  • 1
    This really is a good answer. I was reviewing some sample MS code for Kinect libraries and was very puzzled as to why the first flavor was being used. I swear had never seen that till today Commented May 28, 2014 at 15:39
1

The 2 if's result in the same result for your example.

A more relevant example is something like:

   string text = null;

   if(text.Equals("something"))
   {
   }

Here, you will get a NullReferenceException, so another way of avoiding this is to reverse the comparison:

   string text = null;

   if("something".Equals(text))
   {
   }

This way, you know the constant "something" will always be valid and any comparable item will work, as the source object is valid.

1
  • 2
    this is why you shouldn't use the instance Equals method in general. Use the static object.Equals method instead (or use the equality operator, as the question asks about), and the problem becomes moot.
    – Servy
    Commented May 28, 2014 at 15:48

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