1182

I'm learning C++ and I'm just getting into virtual functions.

From what I've read (in the book and online), virtual functions are functions in the base class that you can override in derived classes.

But earlier in the book, when learning about basic inheritance, I was able to override base functions in derived classes without using virtual.

So what am I missing here? I know there is more to virtual functions, and it seems to be important so I want to be clear on what it is exactly. I just can't find a straight answer online.

  • 8
    I've created a practical explanation for virtual functions here: nrecursions.blogspot.in/2015/06/… – Nav Jun 7 '15 at 11:18
  • 3
    This is perhaps the biggest benefit of virtual functions -- the ability to structure your code in such a way that newly derived classes will automatically work with the old code without modification! – user3530616 Apr 29 '17 at 13:08
  • tbh, virtual functions are staple feature of OOP, for type erasure. I think, it's non-virtual methods are what is making Object Pascal and C++ special, being optimization of unnecessary big vtable and allowing POD-compatible classes. Many OOP languages expect that every method can be overriden. – Swift - Friday Pie Apr 7 '18 at 9:28
  • This is a good question. Indeed this virtual thing in C++ gets abstracted away in other languages like Java or PHP. In C++ you just gain a bit more control for some rare cases (Be aware of multiple inheritance or that special case of the DDOD). But why is this question posted on stackoverflow.com? – Edgar Alloro May 21 '18 at 21:45
  • I think if you take a look at early binding-late binding and VTABLE it would be more reasonable and make sense. So there is a good explanation ( learncpp.com/cpp-tutorial/125-the-virtual-table ) here. – ceyun Jul 17 at 7:27

25 Answers 25

2569

Here is how I understood not just what virtual functions are, but why they're required:

Let's say you have these two classes:

class Animal
{
    public:
        void eat() { std::cout << "I'm eating generic food."; }
};

class Cat : public Animal
{
    public:
        void eat() { std::cout << "I'm eating a rat."; }
};

In your main function:

Animal *animal = new Animal;
Cat *cat = new Cat;

animal->eat(); // Outputs: "I'm eating generic food."
cat->eat();    // Outputs: "I'm eating a rat."

So far so good, right? Animals eat generic food, cats eat rats, all without virtual.

Let's change it a little now so that eat() is called via an intermediate function (a trivial function just for this example):

// This can go at the top of the main.cpp file
void func(Animal *xyz) { xyz->eat(); }

Now our main function is:

Animal *animal = new Animal;
Cat *cat = new Cat;

func(animal); // Outputs: "I'm eating generic food."
func(cat);    // Outputs: "I'm eating generic food."

Uh oh... we passed a Cat into func(), but it won't eat rats. Should you overload func() so it takes a Cat*? If you have to derive more animals from Animal they would all need their own func().

The solution is to make eat() from the Animal class a virtual function:

class Animal
{
    public:
        virtual void eat() { std::cout << "I'm eating generic food."; }
};

class Cat : public Animal
{
    public:
        void eat() { std::cout << "I'm eating a rat."; }
};

Main:

func(animal); // Outputs: "I'm eating generic food."
func(cat);    // Outputs: "I'm eating a rat."

Done.

  • 133
    So if I'm understanding this correctly, virtual allows the subclass method to be called, even if the object is being treated as its superclass? – Kenny Worden Apr 4 '15 at 3:33
  • 124
    Instead of explaining late binding through the example of an intermediary function "func", here is a more straightforward demonstration -- Animal *animal = new Animal; //Cat *cat = new Cat; Animal *cat = new Cat; animal->eat(); // outputs: "I'm eating generic food." cat->eat(); // outputs: "I'm eating generic food." Even though you're assigning the subclassed object (Cat), the method being invoked is based on the pointer type (Animal) not the type of object it is point to. This is why you need "virtual". – rexbelia Feb 7 '16 at 4:08
  • 27
    Am I the only one finding this default behavior in C++ just weird? I would have expected the code without "virtual" to work. – David 天宇 Wong Jul 7 '16 at 19:53
  • 12
    @David天宇Wong I think virtual introduces some dynamic binding vs static and yes it is weird if you 're coming from languages like Java. – peter Aug 6 '16 at 15:18
  • 24
    First of all, virtual calls are much, much more expensive than regular function calls. The C++ philosophy is fast by default, so virtual calls by default are a big no-no. The second reason is that virtual calls can lead to your code breaking if you inherit a class from a library and it changes its internal implementation of a public or private method (which calls a virtual method internally) without changing the base class behaviour. – saolof Feb 23 '17 at 23:53
618

Without "virtual" you get "early binding". Which implementation of the method is used gets decided at compile time based on the type of the pointer that you call through.

With "virtual" you get "late binding". Which implementation of the method is used gets decided at run time based on the type of the pointed-to object - what it was originally constructed as. This is not necessarily what you'd think based on the type of the pointer that points to that object.

class Base
{
  public:
            void Method1 ()  {  std::cout << "Base::Method1" << std::endl;  }
    virtual void Method2 ()  {  std::cout << "Base::Method2" << std::endl;  }
};

class Derived : public Base
{
  public:
    void Method1 ()  {  std::cout << "Derived::Method1" << std::endl;  }
    void Method2 ()  {  std::cout << "Derived::Method2" << std::endl;  }
};

Base* obj = new Derived ();
  //  Note - constructed as Derived, but pointer stored as Base*

obj->Method1 ();  //  Prints "Base::Method1"
obj->Method2 ();  //  Prints "Derived::Method2"

EDIT - see this question.

Also - this tutorial covers early and late binding in C++.

  • 8
    Excellent, and gets home quickly and with the use of better examples. This is however, simplistic, and the questioner should really just read the page parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/virtual-functions.html. Other folks have already pointed to this resource in SO articles linked from this thread, but I believe this is worth re-mentioning. – Sonny Jun 8 '12 at 13:06
  • 28
    I don't know if early and late binding are terms specificly used in the c++ community, but the correct terms are static (at compile time) and dynamic (at runtime) binding. – mike May 18 '15 at 16:34
  • 24
    @mike - "The term "late binding" dates back to at least the 1960s, where it can be found in Communications of the ACM.". Wouldn't it be nice if there was one correct word for each concept? Unfortunately, it just ain't so. The terms "early binding" and "late binding" predate C++ and even object-oriented programming, and are just as correct as the terms you use. – Steve314 May 18 '15 at 18:22
  • 2
    @BJovke - this answer was written before C++11 was published. Even so, I just compiled it in GCC 6.3.0 (using C++14 by default) with no problems - obviously wrapping the variable declaration and calls in a main function etc. Pointer-to-derived implicitly casts to pointer-to-base (more specialized implicitly casts to more general). Visa-versa you need an explicit cast, usually a dynamic_cast. Anything else - very prone to undefined behavior so make sure you know what you're doing. To the best of my knowledge, this has not changed since before even C++98. – Steve314 Jun 18 '17 at 19:29
  • 8
    Note that C++ compilers today can often optimize late into early binding - when they can be certain of what the binding is going to be. This is also referred to as "de-virtualization". – einpoklum Apr 2 '18 at 0:10
79

You need at least 1 level of inheritance and a downcast to demonstrate it. Here is a very simple example:

class Animal
{        
    public: 
      // turn the following virtual modifier on/off to see what happens
      //virtual   
      std::string Says() { return "?"; }  
};

class Dog: public Animal
{
    public: std::string Says() { return "Woof"; }
};

void test()
{
    Dog* d = new Dog();
    Animal* a = d;       // refer to Dog instance with Animal pointer

    cout << d->Says();   // always Woof
    cout << a->Says();   // Woof or ?, depends on virtual
}
  • 35
    Your example says that the returned string depends on whether the function is virtual, but it doesn't say which result corresponds to virtual and which corresponds to non-virtual. Additionally, it's a little confusing as you're not using the string that's being returned. – Ross Mar 6 '10 at 11:10
  • 7
    With Virtual keyword: Woof. Without Virtual keyword: ?. – Hesham Eraqi Nov 11 '13 at 11:14
  • @HeshamEraqi without virtual it is early binding and it will show "?" of base class – Ahmad Aug 7 '17 at 6:03
  • Really? cout AND std::string in the same code? – mackycheese21 Apr 18 at 21:33
42

You need virtual methods for safe downcasting, simplicity and conciseness.

That’s what virtual methods do: they downcast safely, with apparently simple and concise code, avoiding the unsafe manual casts in the more complex and verbose code that you otherwise would have.


Non-virtual method ⇒ static binding

The following code is intentionally “incorrect”. It doesn’t declare the value method as virtual, and therefore produces an unintended “wrong” result, namely 0:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Expression
{
public:
    auto value() const
        -> double
    { return 0.0; }         // This should never be invoked, really.
};

class Number
    : public Expression
{
private:
    double  number_;

public:
    auto value() const
        -> double
    { return number_; }     // This is OK.

    Number( double const number )
        : Expression()
        , number_( number )
    {}
};

class Sum
    : public Expression
{
private:
    Expression const*   a_;
    Expression const*   b_;

public:
    auto value() const
        -> double
    { return a_->value() + b_->value(); }       // Uhm, bad! Very bad!

    Sum( Expression const* const a, Expression const* const b )
        : Expression()
        , a_( a )
        , b_( b )
    {}
};

auto main() -> int
{
    Number const    a( 3.14 );
    Number const    b( 2.72 );
    Number const    c( 1.0 );

    Sum const       sum_ab( &a, &b );
    Sum const       sum( &sum_ab, &c );

    cout << sum.value() << endl;
}

In the line commented as “bad” the Expression::value method is called, because the statically known type (the type known at compile time) is Expression, and the value method is not virtual.


Virtual method ⇒ dynamic binding.

Declaring value as virtual in the statically known type Expression ensures that the each call will check what actual type of object this is, and call the relevant implementation of value for that dynamic type:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Expression
{
public:
    virtual
    auto value() const -> double
        = 0;
};

class Number
    : public Expression
{
private:
    double  number_;

public:
    auto value() const -> double
        override
    { return number_; }

    Number( double const number )
        : Expression()
        , number_( number )
    {}
};

class Sum
    : public Expression
{
private:
    Expression const*   a_;
    Expression const*   b_;

public:
    auto value() const -> double
        override
    { return a_->value() + b_->value(); }    // Dynamic binding, OK!

    Sum( Expression const* const a, Expression const* const b )
        : Expression()
        , a_( a )
        , b_( b )
    {}
};

auto main() -> int
{
    Number const    a( 3.14 );
    Number const    b( 2.72 );
    Number const    c( 1.0 );

    Sum const       sum_ab( &a, &b );
    Sum const       sum( &sum_ab, &c );

    cout << sum.value() << endl;
}

Here the output is 6.86 as it should be, since the virtual method is called virtually. This is also called dynamic binding of the calls. A little check is performed, finding the actual dynamic type of object, and the relevant method implementation for that dynamic type, is called.

The relevant implementation is the one in the most specific (most derived) class.

Note that method implementations in derived classes here are not marked virtual, but are instead marked override. They could be marked virtual but they’re automatically virtual. The override keyword ensures that if there is not such a virtual method in some base class, then you’ll get an error (which is desirable).


The ugliness of doing this without virtual methods

Without virtual one would have to implement some Do It Yourself version of the dynamic binding. It’s this that generally involves unsafe manual downcasting, complexity and verbosity.

For the case of a single function, as here, it suffices to store a function pointer in the object and call via that function pointer, but even so it involves some unsafe downcasts, complexity and verbosity, to wit:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Expression
{
protected:
    typedef auto Value_func( Expression const* ) -> double;

    Value_func* value_func_;

public:
    auto value() const
        -> double
    { return value_func_( this ); }

    Expression(): value_func_( nullptr ) {}     // Like a pure virtual.
};

class Number
    : public Expression
{
private:
    double  number_;

    static
    auto specific_value_func( Expression const* expr )
        -> double
    { return static_cast<Number const*>( expr )->number_; }

public:
    Number( double const number )
        : Expression()
        , number_( number )
    { value_func_ = &Number::specific_value_func; }
};

class Sum
    : public Expression
{
private:
    Expression const*   a_;
    Expression const*   b_;

    static
    auto specific_value_func( Expression const* expr )
        -> double
    {
        auto const p_self  = static_cast<Sum const*>( expr );
        return p_self->a_->value() + p_self->b_->value();
    }

public:
    Sum( Expression const* const a, Expression const* const b )
        : Expression()
        , a_( a )
        , b_( b )
    { value_func_ = &Sum::specific_value_func; }
};


auto main() -> int
{
    Number const    a( 3.14 );
    Number const    b( 2.72 );
    Number const    c( 1.0 );

    Sum const       sum_ab( &a, &b );
    Sum const       sum( &sum_ab, &c );

    cout << sum.value() << endl;
}

One positive way of looking at this is, if you encounter unsafe downcasting, complexity and verbosity as above, then often a virtual method or methods can really help.

39

Virtual Functions are used to support Runtime Polymorphism.

That is, virtual keyword tells the compiler not to make the decision (of function binding) at compile time, rather postpone it for runtime".

  • You can make a function virtual by preceding the keyword virtual in its base class declaration. For example,

     class Base
     {
        virtual void func();
     }
    
  • When a Base Class has a virtual member function, any class that inherits from the Base Class can redefine the function with exactly the same prototype i.e. only functionality can be redefined, not the interface of the function.

     class Derive : public Base
     {
        void func();
     }
    
  • A Base class pointer can be used to point to Base class object as well as a Derived class object.

  • When the virtual function is called by using a Base class pointer, the compiler decides at run-time which version of the function - i.e. the Base class version or the overridden Derived class version - is to be called. This is called Runtime Polymorphism.
34

If the base class is Base, and a derived class is Der, you can have a Base *p pointer which actually points to an instance of Der. When you call p->foo();, if foo is not virtual, then Base's version of it executes, ignoring the fact that p actually points to a Der. If foo is virtual, p->foo() executes the "leafmost" override of foo, fully taking into account the actual class of the pointed-to item. So the difference between virtual and non-virtual is actually pretty crucial: the former allows runtime polymorphism, the core concept of OO programming, while the latter does not.

  • 7
    I hate to contradict you, but compile-time polymorphism is still polymorphism. Even overloading non-member functions is a form of polymorphism - ad-hoc polymorphism using the terminology in your link. The difference here is between early and late binding. – Steve314 Mar 6 '10 at 8:04
  • 6
    @Steve314, you're pedantically correct (as a fellow pedant, I approve that;-) -- editing the answer to add the missing adjective;-). – Alex Martelli Mar 6 '10 at 16:56
26

Need for Virtual Function explained [Easy to understand]

#include<iostream>

using namespace std;

class A{
public: 
        void show(){
        cout << " Hello from Class A";
    }
};

class B :public A{
public:
     void show(){
        cout << " Hello from Class B";
    }
};


int main(){

    A *a1 = new B; // Create a base class pointer and assign address of derived object.
    a1->show();

}

Output will be:

Hello from Class A.

But with virtual function:

#include<iostream>

using namespace std;

class A{
public:
    virtual void show(){
        cout << " Hello from Class A";
    }
};

class B :public A{
public:
    virtual void show(){
        cout << " Hello from Class B";
    }
};


int main(){

    A *a1 = new B;
    a1->show();

}

Output will be:

Hello from Class B.

Hence with virtual function you can achieve runtime polymorphism.

24

I would like to add another use of Virtual function though it uses the same concept as above stated answers but I guess its worth mentioning.

VIRTUAL DESTRUCTOR

Consider this program below, without declaring Base class destructor as virtual; memory for Cat may not be cleaned up.

class Animal {
    public:
    ~Animal() {
        cout << "Deleting an Animal" << endl;
    }
};
class Cat:public Animal {
    public:
    ~Cat() {
        cout << "Deleting an Animal name Cat" << endl;
    }
};

int main() {
    Animal *a = new Cat();
    delete a;
    return 0;
}

Output:

Deleting an Animal
class Animal {
    public:
    virtual ~Animal() {
        cout << "Deleting an Animal" << endl;
    }
};
class Cat:public Animal {
    public:
    ~Cat(){
        cout << "Deleting an Animal name Cat" << endl;
    }
};

int main() {
    Animal *a = new Cat();
    delete a;
    return 0;
}

Output:

Deleting an Animal name Cat
Deleting an Animal
  • 9
    without declaring Base class destructor as virtual; memory for Cat may not be cleaned up. It's worse than that. Deleting a derived object through a base pointer/reference is pure undefined behaviour. So, it's not just that some memory might leak. Rather, the program is ill-formed, so the compiler may transform it into anything: machine code that happens to work fine, or does nothing, or summons demons from your nose, or etc. That's why, if a program is designed in such a way that some user might delete a derived instance through a base reference, the base must have a virtual destructor – underscore_d May 20 '17 at 21:51
22

You have to distinguish between overriding and overloading. Without the virtual keyword you only overload a method of a base class. This means nothing but hiding. Let's say you have a base class Base and a derived class Specialized which both implement void foo(). Now you have a pointer to Base pointing to an instance of Specialized. When you call foo() on it you can observe the difference that virtual makes: If the method is virtual, the implementation of Specialized will be used, if it is missing, the version from Base will be chosen. It is best practice to never overload methods from a base class. Making a method non-virtual is the way of its author to tell you that its extension in subclasses is not intended.

  • 2
    Without virtual you are not overloading. You are shadowing. If a base class B has one or more functions foo, and the derived class D defines a foo name, that foo hides all of those foo-s in B. They are reached as B::foo using scope resolution. To promote B::foo functions into D for overloading, you have to use using B::foo. – Kaz Nov 23 '17 at 23:52
19

Why do we need Virtual Methods in C++?

Quick Answer:

  1. It provides us with one of the needed "ingredients"1 for object oriented programming.

In Bjarne Stroustrup C++ Programming: Principles and Practice, (14.3):

The virtual function provides the ability to define a function in a base class and have a function of the same name and type in a derived class called when a user calls the base class function. That is often called run-time polymorphism, dynamic dispatch, or run-time dispatch because the function called is determined at run time based on the type of the object used.

  1. It is the fastest more efficient implementation if you need a virtual function call 2.

To handle a virtual call, one needs one or more pieces of data related to the derived object 3. The way that is usually done is to add the address of table of functions. This table is usually referred to as virtual table or virtual function table and its address is often called the virtual pointer. Each virtual function gets a slot in the virtual table. Depending of the caller's object (derived) type, the virtual function, in its turn, invokes the respective override.


1.The use of inheritance, run-time polymorphism, and encapsulation is the most common definition of object-oriented programming.

2. You can't code functionality to be any faster or to use less memory using other language features to select among alternatives at run time. Bjarne Stroustrup C++ Programming: Principles and Practice.(14.3.1).

3. Something to tell which function is really invoked when we call the base class containing the virtual function.

14

When you have a function in the base class, you can Redefine or Override it in the derived class.

Redefining a method : A new implementation for the method of base class is given in the derived class. Does not facilitate Dynamic binding.

Overriding a method: Redefining a virtual method of the base class in the derived class. Virtual method facilitates Dynamic Binding.

So when you said :

But earlier in the book, when learning about basic inheritance, I was able to override base methods in derived classes without using 'virtual'.

you were not overriding it as the method in the base class was not virtual, rather you were redefining it

14

I've my answer in form of a conversation to be a better read:


Why do we need virtual functions?

Because of Polymorphism.

What is Polymorphism?

The fact that a base pointer can also point to derived type objects.

How does this definition of Polymorphism lead into the need for virtual functions?

Well, through early binding.

What is early binding?

Early binding(compile-time binding) in C++ means that a function call is fixed before the program is executed.

So...?

So if you use a base type as the parameter of a function, the compiler will only recognize the base interface, and if you call that function with any arguments from derived classes, it gets sliced off, which is not what you want to happen.

If it's not what we want to happen, why is this allowed?

Because we need Polymorphism!

What's the benefit of Polymorphism then?

You can use a base type pointer as the parameter of a single function, and then in the run-time of your program, you can access each of the derived type interfaces(e.g. their member functions) without any issues, using dereferencing of that single base pointer.

I still don't know what virtual functions are good for...! And this was my first question!

well, this is because you asked your question too soon!

Why do we need virtual functions?

Assume that you called a function with a base pointer, which had the address of an object from one of its derived classes. As we've talked about it above, in the run-time, this pointer gets dereferenced, so far so good, however, we expect a method(== a member function) "from our derived class" to be executed! However, a same method(one that has a same header) is already defined in the base class, so why should your program bother to choose the other method? In other words I mean, how can you tell this scenario off from what we used to see normally happen before?

The brief answer is "a Virtual member function in base", and a little longer answer is that, "at this step, if the program sees a virtual function in the base class, it knows(realizes) that you're trying to use polymorphism" and so goes to derived classes(using v-table, a form of late binding) to find that another method with the same header, but with -expectedly- a different implementation.

Why a different implementation?

You knuckle-head! Go read a good book!

OK, wait wait wait, why would one bother to use base pointers, when he/she could simply use derived type pointers? You be the judge, is all this headache worth it? Look at these two snippets:

//1:

Parent* p1 = &boy;
p1 -> task();
Parent* p2 = &girl;
p2 -> task();

//2:

Boy* p1 = &boy;
p1 -> task();
Girl* p2 = &girl;
p2 -> task();

OK, although I think that 1 is still better than 2, you could write 1 like this either:

//1:

Parent* p1 = &boy;
p1 -> task();
p1 = &girl;
p1 -> task();

and moreover, you should be aware that this is yet just a contrived use of all the things I've explained to you so far. Instead of this, assume for example a situation in which you had a function in your program that used the methods from each of the derived classes respectively(getMonthBenefit()):

double totalMonthBenefit = 0;    
std::vector<CentralShop*> mainShop = { &shop1, &shop2, &shop3, &shop4, &shop5, &shop6};
for(CentralShop* x : mainShop){
     totalMonthBenefit += x -> getMonthBenefit();
}

Now, try to re-write this, without any headaches!

double totalMonthBenefit=0;
Shop1* branch1 = &shop1;
Shop2* branch2 = &shop2;
Shop3* branch3 = &shop3;
Shop4* branch4 = &shop4;
Shop5* branch5 = &shop5;
Shop6* branch6 = &shop6;
totalMonthBenefit += branch1 -> getMonthBenefit();
totalMonthBenefit += branch2 -> getMonthBenefit();
totalMonthBenefit += branch3 -> getMonthBenefit();
totalMonthBenefit += branch4 -> getMonthBenefit();
totalMonthBenefit += branch5 -> getMonthBenefit();
totalMonthBenefit += branch6 -> getMonthBenefit();

And actually, this might be yet a contrived example either!

  • 1
    the concept of iterating on different types of (sub-)objects using a single (super-)object type should be highlighted, that's a good point you gave, thanks – harshvchawla Jul 25 '17 at 16:16
11

It helps if you know the underlying mechanisms. C++ formalizes some coding techniques used by C programmers, "classes" replaced using "overlays" - structs with common header sections would be used to handle objects of different types but with some common data or operations. Normally the base struct of the overlay (the common part) has a pointer to a function table which points to a different set of routines for each object type. C++ does the same thing but hides the mechanisms i.e. the C++ ptr->func(...) where func is virtual as C would be (*ptr->func_table[func_num])(ptr,...), where what changes between derived classes is the func_table contents. [A non-virtual method ptr->func() just translates to mangled_func(ptr,..).]

The upshot of that is that you only need to understand the base class in order to call the methods of a derived class, i.e. if a routine understands class A, you can pass it a derived class B pointer then the virtual methods called will be those of B rather than A since you go through the function table B points at.

9

The keyword virtual tells the compiler it should not perform early binding. Instead, it should automatically install all the mechanisms necessary to perform late binding. To accomplish this, the typical compiler1 creates a single table (called the VTABLE) for each class that contains virtual functions.The compiler places the addresses of the virtual functions for that particular class in the VTABLE. In each class with virtual functions,it secretly places a pointer, called the vpointer (abbreviated as VPTR), which points to the VTABLE for that object. When you make a virtual function call through a base-class pointer the compiler quietly inserts code to fetch the VPTR and look up the function address in the VTABLE, thus calling the correct function and causing late binding to take place.

More details in this link http://cplusplusinterviews.blogspot.sg/2015/04/virtual-mechanism.html

7

The virtual keyword forces the compiler to pick the method implementation defined in the object's class rather than in the pointer's class.

Shape *shape = new Triangle(); 
cout << shape->getName();

In the above example, Shape::getName will be called by default, unless the getName() is defined as virtual in the Base class Shape. This forces the compiler to look for the getName() implementation in the Triangle class rather than in the Shape class.

The virtual table is the mechanism in which the compiler keeps track of the various virtual-method implementations of the subclasses. This is also called dynamic dispatch, and there is some overhead associated with it.

Finally, why is virtual even needed in C++, why not make it the default behavior like in Java?

  1. C++ is based on the principles of "Zero Overhead" and "Pay for what you use". So it doesn't try to perform dynamic dispatch for you, unless you need it.
  2. To provide more control to the interface. By making a function non-virtual, the interface/abstract class can control the behavior in all its implementations.
4

Why do we need virtual functions?

Virtual functions avoid unnecessary typecasting problem, and some of us can debate that why do we need virtual functions when we can use derived class pointer to call the function specific in derived class!the answer is - it nullifies the whole idea of inheritance in large system development, where having single pointer base class object is much desired.

Let's compare below two simple programs to understand the importance of virtual functions:

Program without virtual functions:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class father
{
    public: void get_age() {cout << "Fathers age is 50 years" << endl;}
};

class son: public father
{
    public : void get_age() { cout << "son`s age is 26 years" << endl;}
};

int main(){
    father *p_father = new father;
    son *p_son = new son;

    p_father->get_age();
    p_father = p_son;
    p_father->get_age();
    p_son->get_age();
    return 0;
}

OUTPUT:

Fathers age is 50 years
Fathers age is 50 years
son`s age is 26 years

Program with virtual function:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class father
{
    public:
        virtual void get_age() {cout << "Fathers age is 50 years" << endl;}
};

class son: public father
{
    public : void get_age() { cout << "son`s age is 26 years" << endl;}
};

int main(){
    father *p_father = new father;
    son *p_son = new son;

    p_father->get_age();
    p_father = p_son;
    p_father->get_age();
    p_son->get_age();
    return 0;
}

OUTPUT:

Fathers age is 50 years
son`s age is 26 years
son`s age is 26 years

By closely analyzing both the outputs one can understand the importance of virtual functions.

3

OOP Answer: Subtype Polymorphism

In C++, virtual methods are needed to realise polymorphism, more precisely subtyping or subtype polymorphism if you apply the definition from wikipedia.

Wikipedia, Subtyping, 2019-01-09: In programming language theory, subtyping (also subtype polymorphism or inclusion polymorphism) is a form of type polymorphism in which a subtype is a datatype that is related to another datatype (the supertype) by some notion of substitutability, meaning that program elements, typically subroutines or functions, written to operate on elements of the supertype can also operate on elements of the subtype.

NOTE: Subtype means base class, and subtyp means inherited class.

Further reading regarding Subtype Polymorphism

Technical Answer: Dynamic Dispatch

If you have a pointer to a base class, then the call of the method (that is declared as virtual) will be dispatched to the method of the actual class of the created object. This is how Subtype Polymorphism is realised is C++.

Further reading Polymorphism in C++ and Dynamic Dispatch

Implementation Answer: Creates vtable entry

For each modifier "virtual" on methods, C++ compilers usually create an entry in the vtable of the class in which the method is declared. This is how common C++ compiler realise Dynamic Dispatch.

Further reading vtables


Example Code

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Animal {
public:
    virtual void MakeTypicalNoise() = 0; // no implementation needed, for abstract classes
    virtual ~Animal(){};
};

class Cat : public Animal {
public:
    virtual void MakeTypicalNoise()
    {
        cout << "Meow!" << endl;
    }
};

class Dog : public Animal {
public:
    virtual void MakeTypicalNoise() { // needs to be virtual, if subtype polymorphism is also needed for Dogs
        cout << "Woof!" << endl;
    }
};

class Doberman : public Dog {
public:
    virtual void MakeTypicalNoise() {
        cout << "Woo, woo, woow!";
        cout << " ... ";
        Dog::MakeTypicalNoise();
    }
};

int main() {

    Animal* apObject[] = { new Cat(), new Dog(), new Doberman() };

    const   int cnAnimals = sizeof(apObject)/sizeof(Animal*);
    for ( int i = 0; i < cnAnimals; i++ ) {
        apObject[i]->MakeTypicalNoise();
    }
    for ( int i = 0; i < cnAnimals; i++ ) {
        delete apObject[i];
    }
    return 0;
}

Output of Example Code

Meow!
Woof!
Woo, woo, woow! ... Woof!

UML class diagram of code example

UML class diagram of code example

  • Take my upvote because you show the perhaps most important use of polymorphism: That a base class with virtual member functions specifies an interface or, in other words, an API. Code using such a class frame work (here: your main function) can treat all items in a collection (here: your array) uniformly and does not need to, does not want to, and indeed often cannot know which concrete implementation will be invoked at run time, for example because it does not yet exist. This is one of the foundations of carving out abstract relations between objects and handlers. – Peter A. Schneider Jul 29 at 7:08
2

About efficiency, the virtual functions are slightly less efficient as the early-binding functions.

"This virtual call mechanism can be made almost as efficient as the "normal function call" mechanism (within 25%). Its space overhead is one pointer in each object of a class with virtual functions plus one vtbl for each such class" [A tour of C++ by Bjarne Stroustrup]

  • 1
    Late binding doesn't just make function call slower, it makes the called function unknown until run time, so optimizations across the function call can't be applied. This can change everything f.ex. in cases where value propagation removes a lot of code (think if(param1>param2) return cst; where the compiler can reduce the whole function call to a constant in some cases). – curiousguy Oct 27 '15 at 6:05
2

Virtual methods are used in interface design. For example in Windows there is an interface called IUnknown like below:

interface IUnknown {
  virtual HRESULT QueryInterface (REFIID riid, void **ppvObject) = 0;
  virtual ULONG   AddRef () = 0;
  virtual ULONG   Release () = 0;
};

These methods are left to the interface user to implement. They are essential for the creation and destruction of certain objects that must inherit IUnknown. In this case the run-time is aware of the three methods and expects them to be implemented when it calls them. So in a sense they act as a contract between the object itself and whatever uses that object.

  • the run-time is aware of the three methods and expects them to be implemented As they are pure virtual, there is no way to create an instance of IUnknown, and so all subclasses must implement all such methods in order to merely compile. There's no danger of not implementing them and only finding that out at runtime (but obviously one can wrongly implement them, of course!). And wow, today I learned Windows #defines a macro with the word interface, presumably because their users can't just (A) see the prefix I in the name or (B) look at the class to see it's an interface. Ugh – underscore_d May 20 '17 at 21:56
2

Here is complete example that illustrates why virtual method is used.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Basic
{
    public:
    virtual void Test1()
    {
        cout << "Test1 from Basic." << endl;
    }
    virtual ~Basic(){};
};
class VariantA : public Basic
{
    public:
    void Test1()
    {
        cout << "Test1 from VariantA." << endl;
    }
};
class VariantB : public Basic
{
    public:
    void Test1()
    {
        cout << "Test1 from VariantB." << endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Basic *object;
    VariantA *vobjectA = new VariantA();
    VariantB *vobjectB = new VariantB();

    object=(Basic *) vobjectA;
    object->Test1();

    object=(Basic *) vobjectB;
    object->Test1();

    delete vobjectA;
    delete vobjectB;
    return 0;
}
1

i think you are referring to the fact once a method is declared virtual you don't need to use the 'virtual' keyword in overrides.

class Base { virtual void foo(); };

class Derived : Base 
{ 
  void foo(); // this is overriding Base::foo
};

If you don't use 'virtual' in Base's foo declaration then Derived's foo would just be shadowing it.

1

Here is a merged version of the C++ code for the first two answers.

#include        <iostream>
#include        <string>

using   namespace       std;

class   Animal
{
        public:
#ifdef  VIRTUAL
                virtual string  says()  {       return  "??";   }
#else
                string  says()  {       return  "??";   }
#endif
};

class   Dog:    public Animal
{
        public:
                string  says()  {       return  "woof"; }
};

string  func(Animal *a)
{
        return  a->says();
}

int     main()
{
        Animal  *a = new Animal();
        Dog     *d = new Dog();
        Animal  *ad = d;

        cout << "Animal a says\t\t" << a->says() << endl;
        cout << "Dog d says\t\t" << d->says() << endl;
        cout << "Animal dog ad says\t" << ad->says() << endl;

        cout << "func(a) :\t\t" <<      func(a) <<      endl;
        cout << "func(d) :\t\t" <<      func(d) <<      endl;
        cout << "func(ad):\t\t" <<      func(ad)<<      endl;
}

Two different results are:

Without #define virtual, it binds at compile time. Animal *ad and func(Animal *) all point to the Animal's says() method.

$ g++ virtual.cpp -o virtual
$ ./virtual 
Animal a says       ??
Dog d says      woof
Animal dog ad says  ??
func(a) :       ??
func(d) :       ??
func(ad):       ??

With #define virtual, it binds at run time. Dog *d, Animal *ad and func(Animal *) point/refer to the Dog's says() method as Dog is their object type. Unless [Dog's says() "woof"] method is not defined, it will be the one searched first in the class tree, i.e. derived classes may override methods of their base classes [Animal's says()].

$ g++ virtual.cpp -D VIRTUAL -o virtual
$ ./virtual 
Animal a says       ??
Dog d says      woof
Animal dog ad says  woof
func(a) :       ??
func(d) :       woof
func(ad):       woof

It is interesting to note that all class attributes (data and methods) in Python are effectively virtual. Since all objects are dynamically created at runtime, there is no type declaration or a need for keyword virtual. Below is Python's version of code:

class   Animal:
        def     says(self):
                return  "??"

class   Dog(Animal):
        def     says(self):
                return  "woof"

def     func(a):
        return  a.says()

if      __name__ == "__main__":

        a = Animal()
        d = Dog()
        ad = d  #       dynamic typing by assignment

        print("Animal a says\t\t{}".format(a.says()))
        print("Dog d says\t\t{}".format(d.says()))
        print("Animal dog ad says\t{}".format(ad.says()))

        print("func(a) :\t\t{}".format(func(a)))
        print("func(d) :\t\t{}".format(func(d)))
        print("func(ad):\t\t{}".format(func(ad)))

The output is:

Animal a says       ??
Dog d says      woof
Animal dog ad says  woof
func(a) :       ??
func(d) :       woof
func(ad):       woof

which is identical to C++'s virtual define. Note that d and ad are two different pointer variables referring/pointing to the same Dog instance. The expression (ad is d) returns True and their values are the same <main.Dog object at 0xb79f72cc>.

0

We need virtual methods for supporting "Run time Polymorphism". When you refer to a derived class object using a pointer or a reference to the base class, you can call a virtual function for that object and execute the derived class's version of the function.

0

Are you familiar with function pointers? Virtual functions are a similar idea, except you can easily bind data to virtual functions (as class members). It is not as easy to bind data to function pointers. To me, this is the main conceptual distinction. A lot of other answers here are just saying "because... polymorphism!"

0

The bottom line is that virtual functions make life easier. Let's use some of M Perry's ideas and describe what would happen if we didn't have virtual functions and instead only could use member-function pointers. We have, in the normal estimation without virtual functions:

 class base {
 public:
 void helloWorld() { std::cout << "Hello World!"; }
  };

 class derived: public base {
 public:
 void helloWorld() { std::cout << "Greetings World!"; }
 };

 int main () {
      base hwOne;
      derived hwTwo = new derived();
      base->helloWorld(); //prints "Hello World!"
      derived->helloWorld(); //prints "Hello World!"

Ok, so that is what we know. Now let's try to do it with member-function pointers:

 #include <iostream>
 using namespace std;

 class base {
 public:
 void helloWorld() { std::cout << "Hello World!"; }
 };

 class derived : public base {
 public:
 void displayHWDerived(void(derived::*hwbase)()) { (this->*hwbase)(); }
 void(derived::*hwBase)();
 void helloWorld() { std::cout << "Greetings World!"; }
 };

 int main()
 {
 base* b = new base(); //Create base object
 b->helloWorld(); // Hello World!
 void(derived::*hwBase)() = &derived::helloWorld; //create derived member 
 function pointer to base function
 derived* d = new derived(); //Create derived object. 
 d->displayHWDerived(hwBase); //Greetings World!

 char ch;
 cin >> ch;
 }

While we can do some things with member-function pointers, they aren't as flexible as virtual functions. It is tricky to use a member-function pointer in a class; the member-function pointer almost, at least in my practice, always must be called in the main function or from within a member function as in the above example.

On the other hand, virtual functions, while they might have some function-pointer overhead, do simplify things dramatically.

EDIT: There is another method which is similar by eddietree: c++ virtual function vs member function pointer (performance comparison) .

protected by eyllanesc Jun 25 '18 at 20:12

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