5

So I'm building a simple script that backs up certain documents to my second hard-drive (you never know what could happen!). So, I used the shutil.copytree function to replicate my data on the second drive. It works beautifully, and that is not the problem.

I use the shutil.rmtree function to remove the tree if the destination already exists. I'll show you my code:

import shutil
import os

def overwrite(src, dest):
    if(not os.path.exists(src)):
        print(src, "does not exist, so nothing may be copied.")
        return

    if(os.path.exists(dest)):
        shutil.rmtree(dest)

    shutil.copytree(src, dest)
    print(dest, "overwritten with data from", src)
    print("")

overwrite(r"C:\Users\Centurion\Dropbox\Documents", r"D:\Backup\Dropbox Documents")
overwrite(r"C:\Users\Centurion\Pictures", r"D:\Backup\All Pictures")

print("Press ENTER to continue...")
input()

As you can see, a simple script. Now, when I run the script for the first time, everything is fine. Pictures and Documents copy over to my D: drive just fine. However, when I run for the second time, this is my output:

C:\Users\Centurion\Programming\Python>python cpdocsnpics.py
D:\Backup\Dropbox Documents overwritten with data from C:\Users\Centurion\Dropbox\Documents

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "cpdocsnpics.py", line 17, in <module>
    overwrite(r"C:\Users\Centurion\Pictures", r"D:\Backup\All Pictures")
  File "cpdocsnpics.py", line 10, in overwrite
    shutil.rmtree(dest)
  File "C:\Python34\lib\shutil.py", line 477, in rmtree
    return _rmtree_unsafe(path, onerror)
  File "C:\Python34\lib\shutil.py", line 376, in _rmtree_unsafe
    onerror(os.rmdir, path, sys.exc_info())
  File "C:\Python34\lib\shutil.py", line 374, in _rmtree_unsafe
    os.rmdir(path)
PermissionError: [WinError 5] Access is denied: 'D:\\Backup\\All Pictures'

The error only happens when I copy Pictures after the first time; I'm assuming it has something to do with being a Library.

What should I do?

4

That's a cross-platform consistency issue. You've copied files/dirs with readonly attribute. On the first time "dest" not exists, thus rmtree method is not performed. However, when you try run "overwrite" function we can notice that "dest" location exists (and its subtree) but it was copied with readonly access. So here we got a problem. In order to "fix" issue, you must provide a handler for onerror parameter of shutil.rmtree. As long as your problem is regarding readonly issues the workaround is somewhat like this:

def readonly_handler(func, path, execinfo): 
    os.chmod(path, 128) #or os.chmod(path, stat.S_IWRITE) from "stat" module
    func(path)

As you can see in the python doc onerror must be a callable that accepts three parameters: function, path, and excinfo. For further info, read the docs.

def overwrite(src, dest):
    if(not os.path.exists(src)):
        print(src, "does not exist, so nothing may be copied.")
        return

    if(os.path.exists(dest)):  
        shutil.rmtree(dest, onerror=readonly_handler)

    shutil.copytree(src, dest)
    print(dest, "overwritten with data from", src)
    print("")

Of course, this handler is simple and specific but if other errors occur, new exceptions will be raised and this handler may not be able to fix them!

Note: Tim Golden (Python for windows contributor) has been patching the shutil.rmtree issue and it seems it will be resolved in Python 3.5 (see issue 19643).

  • Interesting! Do all functions have an onerror handler? – user569322 May 29 '14 at 14:14
  • @Ken It depends! Your especific error is due to an access error in this case readonly file. As long as you cannot predict whether your files will be copied with "readonly" attributes set so I sugest you pass a callback (as readonly_handler) to shutil.rmtree – felipsmartins May 29 '14 at 14:59
4

I found a problem other than the read-only file using shutil.rmtree on Windows (testing on Windows 7). I was using a combination of shutil.rmtree and shutil.copytree to create a test fixture in a test suite, so the sequence was being called repeatedly in a short period of tme (<1 sec intervals), and I was seeing unpredictable failures part way through the test suite, with both EACCES and ENOTEMPTY errors reported. The symptoms suggested to me that the shutil.rmtree function had not completed on return to the calling program, and that it was only after some time that the deleted filenames were available for re-use.

TL;DR: the solution isn't pretty - broadly, it renames the directory before deleting it, but there are a number of wrinkles that need to be handled because the Windows file system seems to take some time to catch up with the operations perfumed. The actual code catches a variety of failure conditions and retries a variant of the failed operation after a short delay.

A longer discussion follows, with my final code at the end.

My first thought was to try renaming the directory tree before removing it, so that the original directory name is immediately available for re-use. This does appear to help. To this end, I created a replacement for rmtree whose essence is this:

def removetree(tgt):
    def error_handler(func, path, execinfo):
        e = execinfo[1]
        if e.errno == errno.ENOENT or not os.path.exists(path):
            return              # path does not exist - treat as success
        if func in (os.rmdir, os.remove) and e.errno == errno.EACCES:
            os.chmod(path, stat.S_IRWXU| stat.S_IRWXG| stat.S_IRWXO) # 0777
            func(path)          # read-only file; make writable and retry
        raise e
    tmp = os.path.join(os.path.dirname(tgt),"_removetree_tmp")
    os.rename(tgt, tmp)
    shutil.rmtree(tmp, onerror=error_handler)
    return

I found this logic was an improvement, but it was subject to unpredictable failure of the os.rename operation, with one of several possible errors. So I also added some retry logic around os.rename, thus:

def removetree(tgt):
    def error_handler(func, path, execinfo):
        # figure out recovery based on error...
        e = execinfo[1]
        if e.errno == errno.ENOENT or not os.path.exists(path):
            return              # path does not exist
        if func in (os.rmdir, os.remove) and e.errno == errno.EACCES:
            os.chmod(path, stat.S_IRWXU| stat.S_IRWXG| stat.S_IRWXO) # 0777
            func(path)          # read-only file; make writable and retry
        raise e
    # Rename target directory to temporary value, then remove it
    count = 0 
    while count < 10:           # prevents indefinite loop
        count += 1
        tmp = os.path.join(os.path.dirname(tgt),"_removetree_tmp_%d"%(count))
        try:
            os.rename(tgt, tmp)
            shutil.rmtree(tmp, onerror=error_handler)
            break
        except OSError as e:
            time.sleep(1)       # Give file system some time to catch up
            if e.errno in [errno.EACCES, errno.ENOTEMPTY]:
                continue        # Try another temp name
            if e.errno == errno.EEXIST:
                shutil.rmtree(tmp, ignore_errors=True)  # Try to clean up old files
                continue        # Try another temp name
            if e.errno == errno.ENOENT:
                break           # 'src' does not exist(?)
            raise               # Other error - propagate
    return

The above code is not tested, but the general idea here does seem to work. The full code I actually use is below, and uses two functions. It probably contains some unnecessary logic, but does seem to be working more reliably for me (in that my test suite now passes repeatedly on Windows where previously it failed unpredictably on a majority of runs):

def renametree_temp(src):
    """
    Rename tree to temporary name, and return that name, or 
    None if the source directory does not exist.
    """
    count = 0 
    while count < 10:      # prevents indefinite loop
        count += 1
        tmp = os.path.join(os.path.dirname(src),"_removetree_tmp_%d"%(count))
        try:
            os.rename(src, tmp)
            return tmp      # Success!
        except OSError as e:
            time.sleep(1)
            if e.errno == errno.EACCES:
                log.warning("util.renametree_temp: %s EACCES, retrying"%tmp)
                continue    # Try another temp name
            if e.errno == errno.ENOTEMPTY:
                log.warning("util.renametree_temp: %s ENOTEMPTY, retrying"%tmp)
                continue    # Try another temp name
            if e.errno == errno.EEXIST:
                log.warning("util.renametree_temp: %s EEXIST, retrying"%tmp)
                shutil.rmtree(tmp, ignore_errors=True)  # Try to clean up old files
                continue    # Try another temp name
            if e.errno == errno.ENOENT:
                log.warning("util.renametree_temp: %s ENOENT, skipping"%tmp)
                break       # 'src' does not exist(?)
            raise           # Other error: propagaee
    return None

def removetree(tgt):
    """
    Work-around for python problem with shutils tree remove functions on Windows.
    See:
        https://stackoverflow.com/questions/23924223/
        https://stackoverflow.com/questions/1213706/
        https://stackoverflow.com/questions/1889597/
        http://bugs.python.org/issue19643
    """
    # shutil.rmtree error handler that attempts recovery from attempts 
    # on Windows to remove a read-only file or directory (see links above).
    def error_handler(func, path, execinfo):
        e = execinfo[1]
        if e.errno == errno.ENOENT or not os.path.exists(path):
            return          # path does not exist: nothing to do
        if func in (os.rmdir, os.remove) and e.errno == errno.EACCES:
            try:
                os.chmod(path, stat.S_IRWXU| stat.S_IRWXG| stat.S_IRWXO) # 0777
            except Exception as che:
                log.warning("util.removetree: chmod failed: %s"%che)
            try:
                func(path)
            except Exception as rfe:
                log.warning("util.removetree: 'func' retry failed: %s"%rfe)
                if not os.path.exists(path):
                    return      # Gone, assume all is well
                raise
        if e.errno == errno.ENOTEMPTY:
            log.warning("util.removetree: Not empty: %s, %s"%(path, tgt))
            time.sleep(1)
            removetree(path)    # Retry complete removal
            return
        log.warning("util.removetree: rmtree path: %s, error: %s"%(path, repr(execinfo)))
        raise e
    # Try renaming to a new directory first, so that the tgt is immediately 
    # available for re-use.
    tmp = renametree_temp(tgt)
    if tmp:
        shutil.rmtree(tmp, onerror=error_handler)
    return

(The above code incorporates a solution to the read-only file problem from What user do python scripts run as in windows?, which according to Deleting directory in Python is tested. I don't think I encounter the read-only file problem, so assume it is not tested in my test suite.)

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