22
for x in records:
   data = {}
   for y in sObjectName.describe()['fields']
         data[y['name']] = x[y['name']]
   ls.append(adapter.insert_posts(collection, data))

I want to execute the code ls.append(adapter.insert_post(collection, x)) in the batch size of 500, where x should contain 500 data dicts. I could create a list a of 500 data dicts using a double for loop and a list and then insert it. I could do that in the following way, , is there a better way to do it? :

for x in records:
    for i in xrange(0,len(records)/500):
        for j in xrange(0,500):
            l=[]
            data = {}
            for y in sObjectName.describe()['fields']:
                data[y['name']] = x[y['name']]
                #print data
            #print data
            l.append(data)
        ls.append(adapter.insert_posts(collection, data))

    for i in xrange(0,len(records)%500):
        l=[]
        data = {}
        for y in sObjectName.describe()['fields']:
            data[y['name']] = x[y['name']]
            #print data
        #print data
        l.append(data)
    ls.append(adapter.insert_posts(collection, data))

5 Answers 5

54

The general structure I use looks like this:

worklist = [...]
batchsize = 500

for i in range(0, len(worklist), batchsize):
    batch = worklist[i:i+batchsize] # the result might be shorter than batchsize at the end
    # do stuff with batch

Note that we're using the step argument of range to simplify the batch processing considerably.

5
  • 1
    @Mudits -- slicing is forgiving for all builtin python sequences.
    – mgilson
    May 29, 2014 at 6:23
  • 8
    in python3 use range instead of xrange for this to work
    – alex9311
    May 23, 2019 at 16:40
  • 1
    I'm surprised that my_list[0:5] yields [1, 2, 3] based on my_list = [1,2,3] (and does NOT crash)
    – Boern
    Oct 11, 2019 at 7:17
  • What is meant by worklist? Thanks in advance @nneonneo @mgilson @alex9311 @Boern Sep 6, 2021 at 8:38
  • 1
    @StressedBoi69420: Just the list of things that you want to process in batches. This code will process 500 elements of the list at a time.
    – nneonneo
    Sep 8, 2021 at 0:23
8

If you're working with sequences, the solution by @nneonneo is about as performant as you can get. If you want a solution which works with arbitrary iterables, you can look into some of the itertools recipes. e.g. grouper:

def grouper(iterable, n, fillvalue=None):
    "Collect data into fixed-length chunks or blocks"
    # grouper('ABCDEFG', 3, 'x') --> ABC DEF Gxx
    args = [iter(iterable)] * n
    return itertools.izip_longest(fillvalue=fillvalue, *args)

I tend to not use this one because it "fills" the last group with None so that it is the same length as the others. I usually define my own variant which doesn't have this behavior:

def grouper2(iterable, n):
    iterable = iter(iterable)
    while True:
        tup = tuple(itertools.islice(iterable, 0, n))
        if tup:
            yield tup
        else:
            break

This yields tuples of the requested size. This is generally good enough, but, for a little fun we can write a generator which returns lazy iterables of the correct size if we really want to...

The "best" solution here I think depends a bit on the problem at hand -- particularly the size of the groups and objects in the original iterable and the type of the original iterable. Generally, these last 2 recipes will find less use because they're more complex and rarely needed. However, If you're feeling adventurous and in the mood for a little fun, read on!


The only real modification that we need to get a lazy iterable instead of a tuple is the ability to "peek" at the next value in the islice to see if there is anything there. here I just peek at the value -- If it's missing, StopIteration will be raised which will stop the generator just as if it had ended normally. If it's there, I put it back using itertools.chain:

def grouper3(iterable, n):
    iterable = iter(iterable)
    while True:
        group = itertools.islice(iterable, n)
        item = next(group)  # raises StopIteration if the group doesn't yield anything
        yield itertools.chain((item,), group)

Careful though, this last function only "works" if you completely exhaust each iterable yielded before moving on to the next one. In the extreme case where you don't exhaust any of the iterables, e.g. list(grouper3(..., n)), you'll get "m" iterables which yield only 1 item, not n (where "m" is the "length" of the input iterable). This behavior could actually be useful sometimes, but not typically. We can fix that too if we use the itertools "consume" recipe (which also requires importing collections in addition to itertools):

def grouper4(iterable, n):
    iterable = iter(iterable)
    group = []
    while True:
        collections.deque(group, maxlen=0)  # consume all of the last group
        group = itertools.islice(iterable, n)
        item = next(group)  # raises StopIteration if the group doesn't yield anything
        group = itertools.chain((item,), group)
        yield group

Of course, list(grouper4(..., n)) will return empty iterables -- Any value not pulled from the "group" before the next invocation of next (e.g. when the for loop cycles back to the start) will never get yielded.

1
  • You can shorten the code of groupers 3, 4 by one line by checking if an element exists directly on the source iterable instead of on the group. For grouper3, the inside of the loop can be item = next(iterable); yield chain((item,), islice(iterable, n-1)) for the same effect. Your code is perfectly intuitive and legible, so I am not suggesing you change it, just offering an alternative phrasing. Jun 30, 2017 at 16:29
5

I like @nneonneo and @mgilson's answers but doing this over and over again is tedious. The bottom of the itertools page in python3 mentions the library more-itertools (I know this question was about python2 and this is python3 library, but some might find this useful). The following seems to do what you ask:

from more_itertools import chunked # Note: you might also want to look at ichuncked

for batch in chunked(records, 500):
    # Do the work--`batch` is a list of 500 records (or less for the last batch).  
2

Maybe something like this?

l = []
for ii, x in enumerate(records):
    data = {}
    for y in sObjectName.describe()['fields']
        data[y['name']] = x[y['name']]
    l.append(data)
    if not ii % 500:
        ls.append(adapter.insert_posts(collection, l))
        l = []
1

I think one particular case scenario is not covered here. Let`s say the batch size is 100 and your list size is 103, the above answer might miss the last 3 element.

list = [.....] 103 elements
total_size = len(list)
batch_size_count=100

for start_index in range(0, total_size, batch_size_count):
    list[start_index : start_index+batch_size_count] #Slicing operation

Above sliced list can be sent to each method call to complete the execution for all the elements.

2
  • 1
    FYI, my solution does not miss any elements. In Python, it is acceptable to specify an end index past the end of the list - the result will be simply truncated to the available elements. Therefore there's no need to over-complicate the solution by manually adjusting the end index.
    – nneonneo
    Jul 19, 2022 at 19:18
  • you are correct. I have modified the logic as per the comments. Thanks for notifying it. Jul 20, 2022 at 5:44

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