371

I want to write some pre-defined texts to a file with the following:

text="this is line one\n
this is line two\n
this is line three"

echo -e $text > filename

I'm expecting something like this:

this is line one
this is line two
this is line three

But got this:

this is line one
 this is line two
 this is line three

I'm positive that there is no space after each \n, but how does the extra space come out?

  • 2
    I'm not sure but.. how if you just typed text="this is line one\nthis is line two\nthis is line three" in the same one line..? (without any enter) – Yohanes Khosiawan 许先汉 May 29 '14 at 8:49
  • 4
    Remove the \n on each line, you have already hit newline to move to the new line – Mark Setchell May 29 '14 at 8:50
  • You already given \n.So why you put next line in new line? Simply text="this is line one\nthis is line two\nthis is line three" – Jayesh Bhoi May 29 '14 at 8:52
  • 1
    Removing the \n at the end of each line causes the output to all run together on a single line. – Jonathan Hartley Oct 2 '15 at 17:50
  • 16
    Aha: Putting double quotes around the "$text" in the echo line is crucial. Without them, none of the newlines (both literal and '\n') work. With them, they all do. – Jonathan Hartley Oct 2 '15 at 18:18
608

Heredoc sounds more convenient for this purpose. It is used to send multiple commands to a command interpreter program like ex or cat

cat << EndOfMessage
This is line 1.
This is line 2.
Line 3.
EndOfMessage

The string after << indicates where to stop.

To send these lines to a file, use:

cat > $FILE <<- EOM
Line 1.
Line 2.
EOM

You could also store these lines to a variable:

read -r -d '' VAR << EOM
This is line 1.
This is line 2.
Line 3.
EOM

This stores the lines to the variable named VAR.

When printing, remember the quotes around the variable otherwise you won't see the newline characters.

echo "$VAR"

Even better, you can use indentation to make it stand out more in your code. This time just add a - after << to stop the tabs from appearing.

read -r -d '' VAR <<- EOM
    This is line 1.
    This is line 2.
    Line 3.
EOM

But then you must use tabs, not spaces, for indentation in your code.

  • 33
    why do you have <<- instead of << on the first line of the 2nd and 5th code block? does - do anything special? – lohfu Jul 1 '15 at 18:31
  • 29
    @sup3rman '-' Ignores leading tabs. See stackoverflow.com/questions/2500436/… – kervin Aug 30 '15 at 13:27
  • 5
    how can I make read exit with status 0? It seems like it can't find end of line (since it's -d '') and exits with 1 which doesn't help when you are in script. – Misha Slyusarev Nov 30 '15 at 16:52
  • 5
    @MishaSlyusarev use -d '\0' and add a \0 at the end of your last line – Lars Schneider Jan 21 '16 at 11:48
  • 9
    Using the -d option in read -r -d '' VARIABLE <<- EOM did not work for me. – dron22 May 12 '16 at 11:58
151

If you're trying to get the string into a variable, another easy way is something like this:

USAGE=$(cat <<-END
    This is line one.
    This is line two.
    This is line three.
END
)

If you indent your string with tabs (i.e., '\t'), the indentation will be stripped out. If you indent with spaces, the indentation will be left in.

NOTE: It is significant that the last closing parenthesis is on another line. The END text must appear on a line by itself.

  • 1
    Is is that significant? Works on my mac with ) on the same line. I think it's because what goes between $( and ) is gonna execute in its own universe, and the actual command won't see ')' anyway. I wonder if it works for others too. – deej Jan 17 '17 at 17:40
  • It's possible that different shells will interpret things differently. In the bash documentation it doesn't seem to say anything one way or the other, but all the examples have it on its own line. – Andrew Miner Jan 18 '17 at 16:08
  • Fun thing is, I found you answer when trying to set value for USAGE variable too. So your answer matches exactly. :) – Bunyk Mar 22 '18 at 13:52
  • 1
    @deej From the POSIX spec: The here-document … continues until there is a line containing only the delimiter and a <newline> – Fornost May 12 '18 at 18:56
  • 1
    @Fornost It does not contradict what I said – deej May 12 '18 at 21:34
75

echo adds spaces between the arguments passed to it. $text is subject to variable expansion and word splitting, so your echo command is equivalent to:

echo -e "this" "is" "line" "one\n" "this" "is" "line" "two\n"  ...

You can see that a space will be added before "this". You can either remove the newline characters, and quote $text to preserve the newlines:

text="this is line one
this is line two
this is line three"

echo "$text" > filename

Or you could use printf, which is more robust and portable than echo:

printf "%s\n" "this is line one" "this is line two" "this is line three" > filename

In bash, which supports brace expansion, you could even do:

printf "%s\n" "this is line "{one,two,three} > filename
  • 1
    Thanks for explaining why mod sees extra space when using “echo” command. This answer also is working well when using in bash script (as oppose to interactive shell session). Feel like this is the real answer and should be an accepted answer. – onelaview Oct 18 '18 at 0:20
  • 1
    This should be accepted answer. All other answers provided tons of interesting other ways to solve OP's pain, but technically the question was "how does the extra space come out" and no one addressed this :-) !!! Thank you, Josh for making -1 mystery! – Dmitry Shevkoplyas Jun 14 '19 at 2:22
43

in a bash script the following works:

#!/bin/sh

text="this is line one\nthis is line two\nthis is line three"
echo -e $text > filename

alternatively:

text="this is line one
this is line two
this is line three"
echo "$text" > filename

cat filename gives:

this is line one
this is line two
this is line three
  • It seems the alternative trick works while Shell Scripts but it does not seem to work for bash. – Macindows Nov 27 '19 at 22:34
  • 1
    @Macindows I seem to have forgotten the -e option for echo. Please try again. – Chris Maes Nov 28 '19 at 10:48
35

I've found more solutions since I wanted to have every line properly indented:

  1. You may use echo:

    echo    "this is line one"   \
        "\n""this is line two"   \
        "\n""this is line three" \
        > filename
    

    It does not work if you put "\n" just before \ on the end of a line.

  2. Alternatively, you can use printf for better portability (I happened to have a lot of problems with echo):

    printf '%s\n' \
        "this is line one"   \
        "this is line two"   \
        "this is line three" \
        > filename
    
  3. Yet another solution might be:

    text=''
    text="${text}this is line one\n"
    text="${text}this is line two\n"
    text="${text}this is line three\n"
    printf "%b" "$text" > filename
    

    or

    text=''
    text+="this is line one\n"
    text+="this is line two\n"
    text+="this is line three\n"
    printf "%b" "$text" > filename
    
  4. Another solution is achieved by mixing printf and sed.

    if something
    then
        printf '%s' '
        this is line one
        this is line two
        this is line three
        ' | sed '1d;$d;s/^    //g'
    fi
    

    It is not easy to refactor code formatted like this as you hardcode the indentation level into the code.

  5. It is possible to use a helper function and some variable substitution tricks:

    unset text
    _() { text="${text}${text+
    }${*}"; }
    # That's an empty line which demonstrates the reasoning behind 
    # the usage of "+" instead of ":+" in the variable substitution 
    # above.
    _ ""
    _ "this is line one"
    _ "this is line two"
    _ "this is line three"
    unset -f _
    printf '%s' "$text"
    
  • 3b is my preferred solution when wanting to preserve code indentation and string indentation independently, at least when I cannot use 2 in variable assignment, and is more readable than 3a. When I don't care I just keep the quoted string open over the several lines. – Pysis Apr 28 '19 at 16:04
  • Very nice answer especially 3b – Sumit Trehan Sep 10 '19 at 11:34
5

The following is my preferred way to assign a multi-line string to a variable (I think it looks nice).

read -r -d '' my_variable << \
_______________________________________________________________________________

String1
String2
String3
...
StringN
_______________________________________________________________________________

The number of underscores is the same (here 80) in both cases.

0

Just to mention a simple one-line concatenation as it can be useful sometimes.

# for bash

v=" guga "$'\n'"   puga "

# Just for an example.
v2="bar "$'\n'"   foo "$'\n'"$v"

# Let's simplify the previous version of $v2.
n=$'\n'
v3="bar ${n}   foo ${n}$v"

echo "$v3" 

You'll get something like this

bar 
   foo 
 guga 
   puga 

All leading and ending white spaces will be preserved right for

echo "$v3" > filename
-1

it will work if you put it as below:

AA='first line
\nsecond line 
\nthird line'
echo $AA
output:
first line
second line
third line

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