1

I have the following code for sending data over a socket:

socketclient.java

import java.io.*;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.net.UnknownHostException;

public class SocketClient    
implements Runnable     
{
    private Socket socket;
    private String ServerIP = "192.168.0.11";
    private static final int ServerPort = 7000;

    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        try 
        {
            socket = new Socket(ServerIP, ServerPort);
        }
        catch(Exception e) 
        {
            System.out.print("Whoops! It didn't work on ip" + ServerIP + "!:");
            System.out.print(e.getLocalizedMessage());
            System.out.print("\n");
        }
    }

    public void Send(String s)
    {
        try
        {
            Thread.sleep(10);
            OutputStream out = socket.getOutputStream();  //Starts the output stream
            PrintWriter output = new PrintWriter(out);   
            output.println(s);  //sends the data over the socket
            output.flush(); //flushes the outputwriter
            output.close(); //closes the outputwriter
            out.close(); //closes the outputstream


        }
        catch (UnknownHostException e) {
            System.out.print(e.toString());
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.print(e.toString());
        }catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.print(e.toString());
        }

    }
}

When i dont have the sleep in the send function the server output looks like this (i have it set to print the 'conn' and 'addr' of every connection), the server is coded in python

Connected with 192.168.0.11:52578
in client thread
Connected with 192.168.0.11:52579
in client thread
Connected with 192.168.0.11:52609
in client thread

and the server connection data recieveing/main connection thread is this: def clientthread(conn):

#Sending message to connected client
#Receiving from client
data = conn.recv(4096)
print data
#came out of loop
conn.close()

My goal for the server is to open/close sockets on the client-side everytime i want to send data because i want each reciever to create its own connections using a socket class i created.

What is the reason for having to add a thread.sleep() before sending a string over a TCP socket in java?

Also, this is how i use my Socketclient class:

    SMSClient = new SocketClient();
    Thread thread = new Thread(SMSClient);
    thread.start();
    SMSClient.Send(smsData);
  • you are not calling send anywhere anyway, but it probably has to do with the fact that you are not calling send in the same thread as you are opening the socket. – njzk2 May 29 '14 at 12:59
  • How are you using your SocketClient class ? – Serge Ballesta May 29 '14 at 13:10
  • I edited and added it at the bottom of the post showing an example of how i use it – yampelo May 29 '14 at 13:52
1

When you instantiate a new SocketClient object you are not running the new thread. You should call your Send(String s) method just after socket = new Socket(ServerIP, ServerPort); from inside the run method. To know the current thread in your running code put some log like the following: Log.d("label", "thread id: "+android.os.Process.myTid()). Try for example to evaluate the current thread inside run method, and inside the Send(String s) method when you call this latter as you are doing and after having moved the call to the method inside the run.

I suggest to use IntentService for your purpose since, when needed, you can managed easily the socket connection and transmission in a separate thread.

0

When the thread.start() call returns the thread may not have executed yet. And then you are sending already your first request. You may wait with sleep after thread.start() that is better (while sleeping in the main thread the connection thread has a chance to run) - but still not best practice. Here is my working code ( I added a main function to the SocketClient ):

import java.io.*;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.net.UnknownHostException;

public class SocketClient    
implements Runnable     
{
    private Socket socket;
    private String ServerIP = "127.0.0.1";
    private static final int ServerPort = 7000;
    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        try 
        {
            socket = new Socket(ServerIP, ServerPort);
        }
        catch(Exception e) 
        {
            System.out.print("Whoops! It didn't work on ip" + ServerIP + "!:");
            System.out.print(e.getLocalizedMessage());
            System.out.print("\n");
        }
    }
    public void Send(String s)
    {
        try
        {
            OutputStream out = socket.getOutputStream();  //Starts the output stream
            PrintWriter output = new PrintWriter(out);   
            output.println(s);  //sends the data over the socket
            output.flush(); //flushes the outputwriter
            output.close(); //closes the outputwriter
            out.close(); //closes the outputstream
        }
        catch (UnknownHostException e) {
            System.out.print(e.toString());
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.print(e.toString());
        }catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.print(e.toString());
        }
}
static public void main(String[] args)
{
    SocketClient socketClient = new SocketClient();
    Thread thread = new Thread(socketClient);
    thread.start();
    try
    {
      Thread.sleep(19);
    }
    catch(Exception e) {}

    socketClient.Send("hallo");
}

}

  • i don't see the point of using a thread to open the socket in this case. either open the thread and do the send in the thread or don't thread at all – njzk2 May 29 '14 at 14:15

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