1

So as part of /r/dailyprogrammer's challenge on trying out a few simple tasks in a new Programming language, I tried out Python after only having dabbled in it very slightly.

There I had to recreate a Bubble-Sort in Python and this is what I came up with:

def bubble(unsorted):
    length = len(unsorted)
    isSorted = False
    while not isSorted:
        isSorted = True
        for i in range(0, length-1):
            if(unsorted[i] > unsorted[i+1]):
                isSorted = False
                holder = unsorted[i]
                unsorted[i] = unsorted[i+1]
                unsorted[i+1] = holder

myList = [5,6,4,2,10,1]

bubble(myList)
print myList

Now this code works flawlessly as far as I can tell, and that is precisely the problem. I can't figure out why bubble function would affect the variable myList without me returning anything to it, or setting it anew.

This is really bugging me but it's probably a python type thing :) That or I'm a very silly man indeed.

3
  • It feels almost as though the parameter sent to the Bubble function acts as a pointer in C/C++. I don't know what to make of this.
    – Mike R
    Commented May 29, 2014 at 23:25
  • Python isn't going to deep copy objects implicitly. Think of it like passing by reference in C++.
    – Blender
    Commented May 29, 2014 at 23:25
  • Ah so my thoughts in the comment above were correct. Thank you @Blender :)
    – Mike R
    Commented May 29, 2014 at 23:28

2 Answers 2

2

I'm not sure what the reason of the confusion is, but if you think that each time when you write func(obj) the whole object is copied to the stack, you're wrong.

All parameters, except primitive types such as numbers, are passed by reference. It means that object's members or array elements can be updated after function is executed.

Write a simple prog to confirm that:

>>> a=[1]
>>> def f(x):
...     x[0]=2
... 
>>> f(a)
>>> print a[0]
2

I hope it'll clarify the picture.

For primitive types you'll have a different result though:

>>> i=1
>>> def f(x):
...     x=2
... 
>>> f(i)
>>> print i
1
>>> 
2
  • Thank you for your input, Blender already cleared this up for me in the comments :) Coming from a C++ background this was just surprising. Picked this as the best answer because it is so thorough. Would upvote it too if my rep was so minuscule!
    – Mike R
    Commented May 29, 2014 at 23:57
  • I still remember clearly that when I was switching from C to Java, it was confusing too, but after getting familiar with few interpreting languages it became obvious and it's not confusing anymore. C# has an interesting concept of 'ref' and 'out' that allows passing even primitive types by reference (equivalent of &var in C)
    – Oleg Gryb
    Commented May 30, 2014 at 0:10
1

The answer is unsorted and myList point to the same object, they are not copies. Hence, when you change one you change the other. You can find a visualization of it here.

2
  • Link doesn't seem to work, copying and pasting your code and stepping through will show that unsorted and myList point to the same thing.
    – Dair
    Commented May 29, 2014 at 23:35
  • Thank you for your input, Blender already cleared this up for me in the comments :) Coming from a C++ background this was just surprising.
    – Mike R
    Commented May 29, 2014 at 23:56

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