103

I have 3 very large signed integers.

long x = long.MaxValue;
long y = long.MaxValue - 1;
long z = long.MaxValue - 2;

I want to calculate their truncated average. Expected average value is long.MaxValue - 1, which is 9223372036854775806.

It is impossible to calculate it as:

long avg = (x + y + z) / 3; // 3074457345618258600

Note: I read all those questions about average of 2 numbers, but I don't see how that technique can be applied to average of 3 numbers.

It would be very easy with the usage of BigInteger, but let's assume I cannot use it.

BigInteger bx = new BigInteger(x);
BigInteger by = new BigInteger(y);
BigInteger bz = new BigInteger(z);
BigInteger bavg = (bx + by + bz) / 3; // 9223372036854775806

If I convert to double, then, of course, I lose precision:

double dx = x;
double dy = y;
double dz = z;
double davg = (dx + dy + dz) / 3; // 9223372036854780000

If I convert to decimal, it works, but also let's assume that I cannot use it.

decimal mx = x;
decimal my = y;
decimal mz = z;
decimal mavg = (mx + my + mz) / 3; // 9223372036854775806

Question: Is there a way to calculate the truncated average of 3 very large integers only with the usage of long type? Don't consider that question as C#-specific, just it is easier for me to provide samples in C#.

6
  • 1
    why not calculate the overall avg diff and substract that from max? – user57508 May 30 '14 at 8:03
  • 6
    @AndreasNiedermair Wouldn't work in case if I have long.MinValue and long.MaxValue among values. – Ulugbek Umirov May 30 '14 at 8:05
  • good catch, indeed :) – user57508 May 30 '14 at 8:05
  • Are you sure we need to worry about this, shouldn't this be handled by the framework? – Bolu May 30 '14 at 13:16
  • 11
    Is there any actual reason that BigInteger or decimal is excluded, or is it just for the sake of making this hard? – jpmc26 May 30 '14 at 23:04

12 Answers 12

142

This code will work, but isn't that pretty.

It first divides all three values (it floors the values, so you 'lose' the remainder), and then divides the remainder:

long n = x / 3
         + y / 3
         + z / 3
         + ( x % 3
             + y % 3
             + z % 3
           ) / 3

Note that the above sample does not always work properly when having one or more negative values.

As discussed with Ulugbek, since the number of comments are exploding below, here is the current BEST solution for both positive and negative values.

Thanks to answers and comments of Ulugbek Umirov, James S, KevinZ, Marc van Leeuwen, gnasher729 this is the current solution:

static long CalculateAverage(long x, long y, long z)
{
    return (x % 3 + y % 3 + z % 3 + 6) / 3 - 2
            + x / 3 + y / 3 + z / 3;
}

static long CalculateAverage(params long[] arr)
{
    int count = arr.Length;
    return (arr.Sum(n => n % count) + count * (count - 1)) / count - (count - 1)
           + arr.Sum(n => n / count);
}
28
  • 3
    @DavidG No. In math, (x + y + z) / 3 = x / 3 + y / 3 + z / 3. – Kris Vandermotten May 30 '14 at 8:14
  • 5
    I used Z3 to prove this correct for all variable counts between 1 and 5. – usr May 30 '14 at 14:10
  • 5
    Of course this appears to work, but the way integer truncation operates will screw you up. f(1,1,2) == 1 while f(-2,-2,8) == 2 – KevinZ May 30 '14 at 15:13
  • 11
    Note that due to brain-damaged semantics of the modulo operation, this can give a result that is off by one, namely rounded up rather than down, if negative values for the variables are allowed. For instance if x,y are positive multiples of 3, and z is -2, you get (x+y)/3 which is too much. – Marc van Leeuwen May 30 '14 at 15:15
  • 6
    @KevinZ: ...whose effect then has to be undone by a programmer who never wanted that special-case behavior in the first place. Letting the programmer specify modulus rather than having to derive it from a remainder which the compiler may have derived from modulus would seem helpful. – supercat May 30 '14 at 16:48
27

NB - Patrick has already given a great answer. Expanding on this you could do a generic version for any number of integers like so:

long x = long.MaxValue;
long y = long.MaxValue - 1;
long z = long.MaxValue - 2;

long[] arr = { x, y, z };
var avg = arr.Select(i => i / arr.Length).Sum() 
        + arr.Select(i => i % arr.Length).Sum() / arr.Length;
1
  • 1
    This won't happen for long, but for smaller types, note that the second sum can overflow. – user541686 May 31 '14 at 3:02
7

Patrick Hofman has posted a great solution. But if needed it can still be implemented in several other ways. Using the algorithm here I have another solution. If implemented carefully it may be faster than the multiple divisions in systems with slow hardware divisors. It can be further optimized by using divide by constants technique from hacker's delight

public class int128_t {
    private int H;
    private long L;

    public int128_t(int h, long l)
    {
        H = h;
        L = l;
    }

    public int128_t add(int128_t a)
    {
        int128_t s;
        s.L = L + a.L;
        s.H = H + a.H + (s.L < a.L);
        return b;
    }

    private int128_t rshift2()  // right shift 2
    {
        int128_t r;
        r.H = H >> 2;
        r.L = (L >> 2) | ((H & 0x03) << 62);
        return r;
    }

    public int128_t divideby3()
    {
        int128_t sum = {0, 0}, num = new int128_t(H, L);
        while (num.H || num.L > 3)
        {
            int128_t n_sar2 = num.rshift2();
            sum = add(n_sar2, sum);
            num = add(n_sar2, new int128_t(0, num.L & 3));
        }

        if (num.H == 0 && num.L == 3)
        {
            // sum = add(sum, 1);
            sum.L++;
            if (sum.L == 0) sum.H++;
        }
        return sum; 
    }
};

int128_t t = new int128_t(0, x);
t = t.add(new int128_t(0, y));
t = t.add(new int128_t(0, z));
t = t.divideby3();
long average = t.L;

In C/C++ on 64-bit platforms it's much easier with __int128

int64_t average = ((__int128)x + y + z)/3;
7
  • 2
    I would suggest that a good way of dividing a 32-bit unsigned value by 3 is to multiply by 0x55555555L, add 0x55555555, and shift right by 32. Your divideby3 method, by comparison, looks as though it would require many discrete steps. – supercat May 30 '14 at 15:59
  • @supercat yes I know that method. The method by hacker's delight is even more correct but I'll the implementation for another time – phuclv May 30 '14 at 16:10
  • I'm not sure what "more correct" means. Reciprocal multiplies can in many cases yield exact values directly, or else yield values which can be refined in one or two steps. BTW, I think I should have suggested multiplying by 0x55555556, which would then yield exact results without needing an "add". Also, is your loop condition correct? What modifies H and L in the loop? – supercat May 30 '14 at 16:53
  • Incidentally, even if one doesn't have a hardware multiply, one can quickly approximate an unsigned x=y/3 via x=y>>2; x+=x>>2; x+=x>>4; x+=x>>8; x+=x>>16; x+=x>>32;. The result will be very close to x, and can be made precise by computing delta=y-x-x-x; and using adjusting x as needed. – supercat May 30 '14 at 17:15
  • 1
    @gnasher729 I wonder if it can use that optimization in 32-bit computers since it often cannot do 64x64→128 bit multiplication – phuclv May 31 '14 at 1:58
7

You can calculate the mean of numbers based on the differences between the numbers rather than using the sum.

Let's say x is the max, y is the median, z is the min (as you have). We will call them max, median and min.

Conditional checker added as per @UlugbekUmirov's comment:

long tmp = median + ((min - median) / 2);            //Average of min 2 values
if (median > 0) tmp = median + ((max - median) / 2); //Average of max 2 values
long mean;
if (min > 0) {
    mean = min + ((tmp - min) * (2.0 / 3)); //Average of all 3 values
} else if (median > 0) {
    mean = min;
    while (mean != tmp) {
        mean += 2;
        tmp--;
    }
} else if (max > 0) {
    mean = max;
    while (mean != tmp) {
        mean--;
        tmp += 2;
    }
} else {
    mean = max + ((tmp - max) * (2.0 / 3));
}
8
  • 2
    See @UlugbekUmirov's comment: Wouldn't work in case if I have long.MinValue and long.MaxValue among values – Bolu May 30 '14 at 13:37
  • @Bolu the comment is only applicable to long.MinValue. So I added this conditional to make it work for our case. – La-comadreja May 30 '14 at 13:40
  • How can you use median when it hasn't been initialized? – phuclv May 30 '14 at 16:11
  • @LưuVĩnhPhúc, the median is the value between the minimum and the maximum. – La-comadreja May 30 '14 at 16:44
  • 1
    isn't (double)(2 / 3) equals to 0.0? – phuclv May 31 '14 at 1:48
6

Patching Patrick Hofman's solution with supercat's correction, I give you the following:

static Int64 Avg3 ( Int64 x, Int64 y, Int64 z )
{
    UInt64 flag = 1ul << 63;
    UInt64 x_ = flag ^ (UInt64) x;
    UInt64 y_ = flag ^ (UInt64) y;
    UInt64 z_ = flag ^ (UInt64) z;
    UInt64 quotient = x_ / 3ul + y_ / 3ul + z_ / 3ul
        + ( x_ % 3ul + y_ % 3ul + z_ % 3ul ) / 3ul;
    return (Int64) (quotient ^ flag);
}

And the N element case:

static Int64 AvgN ( params Int64 [ ] args )
{
    UInt64 length = (UInt64) args.Length;
    UInt64 flag = 1ul << 63;
    UInt64 quotient_sum = 0;
    UInt64 remainder_sum = 0;
    foreach ( Int64 item in args )
    {
        UInt64 uitem = flag ^ (UInt64) item;
        quotient_sum += uitem / length;
        remainder_sum += uitem % length;
    }

    return (Int64) ( flag ^ ( quotient_sum + remainder_sum / length ) );
}

This always gives the floor() of the mean, and eliminates every possible edge case.

2
  • 1
    I translated AvgN to Z3 code and proved this correct for all reasonable input sizes (e.g. 1 <= args.Length <= 5 and bitvector size of 6). This answer is correct. – usr May 30 '14 at 23:16
  • Wonderful answer Kevin. Thanks for your contribution! meta.stackoverflow.com/a/303292/993547 – Patrick Hofman Aug 24 '15 at 12:34
5

Because C uses floored division rather than Euclidian division, it may easier to compute a properly-rounded average of three unsigned values than three signed ones. Simply add 0x8000000000000000UL to each number before taking the unsigned average, subtract it after taking the result, and use an unchecked cast back to Int64 to get a signed average.

To compute the unsigned average, compute the sum of the top 32 bits of the three values. Then compute the sum of the bottom 32 bits of the three values, plus the sum from above, plus one [the plus one is to yield a rounded result]. The average will be 0x55555555 times the first sum, plus one third of the second.

Performance on 32-bit processors might be enhanced by producing three "sum" values each of which is 32 bits long, so that the final result is ((0x55555555UL * sumX)<<32) + 0x55555555UL * sumH + sumL/3; it might possibly be further enhanced by replacing sumL/3 with ((sumL * 0x55555556UL) >> 32), though the latter would depend upon the JIT optimizer [it might know how to replace a division by 3 with a multiply, and its code might actually be more efficient than an explicit multiply operation].

8
  • After adding 0x8000000000000000UL doesn't the overflow affect the result? – phuclv May 31 '14 at 2:01
  • @LưuVĩnhPhúc There is no overflow. Go to my answer for an implementation. The splitting into 2 32 bit int was unnecessary though. – KevinZ May 31 '14 at 2:58
  • @KevinZ: Splitting each value into an upper and lower 32-bit part is faster than splitting it into a divide-by-three quotient and remainder. – supercat May 31 '14 at 5:13
  • 1
    @LưuVĩnhPhúc: Unlike signed values which behave semantically like numbers and are not allowed to overflow in a legitimate C program, unsigned values generally behave like members of a wrapping abstract algebraic ring, so the wrapping semantics are well defined. – supercat May 31 '14 at 5:45
  • 1
    The tuple represents -3, -2, -1. After having added 0x8000U to each value, the values should then be split in half: 7F+FF 7F+FE 7F+FD. Add the upper and lower halves, yielding 17D + 2FA. Add the top-half sum to the bottom-half sum yielding 477. Multiply 17D by 55 yielding 7E81. Divide 477 by three yielding 17D. Add 7E81 to 17D yielding 7FFE. Subtract 8000 from that and get -2. – supercat May 31 '14 at 19:51
5

If you know you have N values, can you just divide each value by N and sum them together?

long GetAverage(long* arrayVals, int n)
{
    long avg = 0;
    long rem = 0;

    for(int i=0; i<n; ++i)
    {
        avg += arrayVals[i] / n;
        rem += arrayVals[i] % n;
    }

    return avg + (rem / n);
}
1
  • this is just the same as Patrick Hofman's solution, if not less correct that the final version – phuclv Jun 6 '14 at 2:37
4

You could use the fact that you can write each of the numbers as y = ax + b, where x is a constant. Each a would be y / x (the integer part of that division). Each b would be y % x (the rest/modulo of that division). If you choose this constant in an intelligent way, for example by choosing the square root of the maximum number as a constant, you can get the average of x numbers without having problems with overflow.

The average of an arbitrary list of numbers can be found by finding:

( ( sum( all A's ) / length ) * constant ) + 
( ( sum( all A's ) % length ) * constant / length) +
( ( sum( all B's ) / length )

where % denotes modulo and / denotes the 'whole' part of division.

The program would look something like:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        List<long> list = new List<long>();
        list.Add( long.MaxValue );
        list.Add( long.MaxValue - 1 );
        list.Add( long.MaxValue - 2 );

        long sumA = 0, sumB = 0;
        long res1, res2, res3;
        //You should calculate the following dynamically
        long constant = 1753413056;

        foreach (long num in list)
        {
            sumA += num / constant;
            sumB += num % constant;
        }

        res1 = (sumA / list.Count) * constant;
        res2 = ((sumA % list.Count) * constant) / list.Count;
        res3 = sumB / list.Count;

        Console.WriteLine( res1 + res2 + res3 );
    }
}
2

I also tried it and come up with a faster solution (although only by a factor about 3/4). It uses a single division

public static long avg(long a, long b, long c) {
    final long quarterSum = (a>>2) + (b>>2) + (c>>2);
    final long lowSum = (a&3) + (b&3) + (c&3);
    final long twelfth = quarterSum / 3;
    final long quarterRemainder = quarterSum - 3*twelfth;
    final long adjustment = smallDiv3(lowSum + 4*quarterRemainder);
    return 4*twelfth + adjustment;
}

where smallDiv3 is division by 3 using multipliation and working only for small arguments

private static long smallDiv3(long n) {
    assert -30 <= n && n <= 30;
    // Constants found rather experimentally.
    return (64/3*n + 10) >> 6;
}

Here is the whole code including a test and a benchmark, the results are not that impressive.

1

This function computes the result in two divisions. It should generalize nicely to other divisors and word sizes.

It works by computing the double-word addition result, then working out the division.

Int64 average(Int64 a, Int64 b, Int64 c) {
    // constants: 0x10000000000000000 div/mod 3
    const Int64 hdiv3 = UInt64(-3) / 3 + 1;
    const Int64 hmod3 = UInt64(-3) % 3;

    // compute the signed double-word addition result in hi:lo
    UInt64 lo = a; Int64 hi = a>=0 ? 0 : -1;
    lo += b; hi += b>=0 ? lo<b : -(lo>=UInt64(b));
    lo += c; hi += c>=0 ? lo<c : -(lo>=UInt64(c));

    // divide, do a correction when high/low modulos add up
    return hi>=0 ? lo/3 + hi*hdiv3 + (lo%3 + hi*hmod3)/3
                 : lo/3+1 + hi*hdiv3 + Int64(lo%3-3 + hi*hmod3)/3;
}
0

Math

(x + y + z) / 3 = x/3 + y/3 + z/3

(a[1] + a[2] + .. + a[k]) / k = a[1]/k + a[2]/k + .. + a[k]/k

Code

long calculateAverage (long a [])
{
    double average = 0;

    foreach (long x in a)
        average += (Convert.ToDouble(x)/Convert.ToDouble(a.Length));

    return Convert.ToInt64(Math.Round(average));
}

long calculateAverage_Safe (long a [])
{
    double average = 0;
    double b = 0;

    foreach (long x in a)
    {
        b = (Convert.ToDouble(x)/Convert.ToDouble(a.Length));

        if (b >= (Convert.ToDouble(long.MaxValue)-average))
            throw new OverflowException ();

        average += b;
    }

    return Convert.ToInt64(Math.Round(average));
}
3
  • for the set of {1,2,3} the answer is 2, but your code will return 1. – Ulugbek Umirov Jun 4 '14 at 8:24
  • @UlugbekUmirov code fixed, should used double types for processing – Khaled.K Jun 4 '14 at 10:12
  • 1
    That's what I want to avoid - the usage of double, since we are going to lose precision in such case. – Ulugbek Umirov Jun 4 '14 at 11:00
0

Try this:

long n = Array.ConvertAll(new[]{x,y,z},v=>v/3).Sum()
     +  (Array.ConvertAll(new[]{x,y,z},v=>v%3).Sum() / 3);

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