61

I am trying to add a custom title to a window but I am having troubles with it. I know my code isn't right but when I run it, it creates 2 windows instead, one with just the title tk and another bigger window with "Simple Prog". How do I make it so that the tk window has the title "Simple Prog" instead of having a new additional window. I dont think I'm suppose to have the Tk() part because when i have that in my complete code, there's an error

from tkinter import Tk, Button, Frame, Entry, END

class ABC(Frame):
    def __init__(self,parent=None):
        Frame.__init__(self,parent)
        self.parent = parent
        self.pack()
        ABC.make_widgets(self)

    def make_widgets(self):
        self.root = Tk()
        self.root.title("Simple Prog")

10 Answers 10

88

If you don't create a root window, Tkinter will create one for you when you try to create any other widget. Thus, in your __init__, because you haven't yet created a root window when you initialize the frame, Tkinter will create one for you. Then, you call make_widgets which creates a second root window. That is why you are seeing two windows.

A well-written Tkinter program should always explicitly create a root window before creating any other widgets.

When you modify your code to explicitly create the root window, you'll end up with one window with the expected title.

Example:

from tkinter import Tk, Button, Frame, Entry, END

class ABC(Frame):
    def __init__(self,parent=None):
        Frame.__init__(self,parent)
        self.parent = parent
        self.pack()
        self.make_widgets()

    def make_widgets(self):
        # don't assume that self.parent is a root window.
        # instead, call `winfo_toplevel to get the root window
        self.winfo_toplevel().title("Simple Prog")

        # this adds something to the frame, otherwise the default
        # size of the window will be very small
        label = Entry(self)
        label.pack(side="top", fill="x")

root = Tk()
abc = ABC(root)
root.mainloop()

Also note the use of self.make_widgets() rather than ABC.make_widgets(self). While both end up doing the same thing, the former is the proper way to call the function.

| improve this answer | |
  • Yes, I just ran this code in python ABC().mainloop() and it made 2 things, a window called Simple Prog and another window but just the titlebar part with "tk" – Dan Mar 8 '10 at 4:33
  • 2
    @Dan: My guess is, because you're creating a frame before you create the main window, Tkinter is creating a toplevel window for you (or maybe just a disembodied frame widget). The way you have your code is wrong. You need to create the root window before you create any other windows. – Bryan Oakley Mar 8 '10 at 12:05
46

Here it is nice and simple.

root = tkinter.Tk()
root.title('My Title')

root is the window you create and root.title() sets the title of that window.

| improve this answer | |
14

Try something like:

from tkinter import Tk, Button, Frame, Entry, END

class ABC(Frame):
    def __init__(self, master=None):
        Frame.__init__(self, master)
        self.pack()        

root = Tk()
app = ABC(master=root)
app.master.title("Simple Prog")
app.mainloop()
root.destroy()

Now you should have a frame with a title, then afterwards you can add windows for different widgets if you like.

| improve this answer | |
3

Example of python GUI


Here is an example:

from tkinter import *;
screen = Tk();
screen.geometry("370x420"); //size of screen

Change the name of window

  screen.title('Title Name')

Run it:

screen.mainloop();
| improve this answer | |
  • I'm not really sure what this adds that isn't in one of the other answers – DavidW Oct 12 '19 at 17:57
2

I found this works:

window = Tk()
window.title('Window')

Maybe this helps?

| improve this answer | |
1

Having just done this myself you can do it this way:

from tkinter import Tk, Button, Frame, Entry, END

class ABC(Frame):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        Frame.__init__(self, parent)
        self.parent = parent
        self.pack()
        ABC.make_widgets(self)

    def make_widgets(self):
        self.parent.title("Simple Prog")

You will see the title change, and you won't get two windows. I've left my parent as master as in the Tkinter reference stuff in the python library documentation.

| improve this answer | |
  • So how exactly is this post different from what i posted? – lugte098 Apr 14 '14 at 10:45
  • My answer was years ago so I won't remember why - my answer is much closer to the OP sample and kept in the class, but they could've been suggested as an edit to yours if they mattered. No idea... – Danny Staple Apr 14 '14 at 12:38
1

For anybody who runs into the issue of having two windows open, and runs across this question. Here is how I stumbled upon a solution.

The reason the code in this question is producing two windows is because

Frame.__init__(self, parent)

is being run before

self.root = Tk()

The simple fix is to run Tk() before running Frame.__init_()

self.root = Tk()
Frame.__init__(self, parent)

Why that is the case, I'm not entirely sure.

| improve this answer | |
1

Easy method:

root = Tk()
root.title('Hello World')
| improve this answer | |
  • root.title('Hello World') should be on the next line – kegaming860 Jul 27 at 17:21
  • what is the difference between this ans and the rest of the answer? – Cool Cloud Jul 27 at 17:28
  • Welcome to SO! Thank you for your time in answering this question. Can you please give more details about your solution? For example, why is your solution better than the other answers? Please read How to Answer. – above_c_level Jul 27 at 17:31
0

self.parent is a reference to the actual window, so self.root.title should be self.parent.title, and self.root shouldn't exist.

| improve this answer | |
  • It doesnt seem to work. Am I suppose to keep self.parent = Tk()? – Dan Mar 7 '10 at 10:24
  • yes, you are. I only said to change self.root.title to self.parent.title and remove self.root – Colin Valliant Mar 14 '10 at 9:11
0
widget.winfo_toplevel().title("My_Title")

changes the title of either Tk or Toplevel instance that the widget is a child of.

| improve this answer | |

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