14

What can I use to store multiple different types of data, Int/String/etc.? I come from a PHP background where I can store different types of data into an array, but I don't know how to do that in Java.

Take this example:

$array = array(
    "val1" => 1,
    "val2" => "cat",
    "val3" => true
);

How can I make something similar in Java?

7
  • 1
    Take a look at HashMaps.
    – PakkuDon
    May 30, 2014 at 14:59
  • Don't you have to define your values using a HashMap? May 30, 2014 at 14:59
  • 2
    Object[] is your friend and enemy May 30, 2014 at 15:00
  • 1
    How is this a duplicate? I disagree. This is a different question from the one it's marked a duplicate of. May 30, 2014 at 15:03
  • 1
    Closed so I cant answer but I'd use a typesafe heterogenous container as described in Effective Java (and linked to earlier in this sentence). The typesafe heterogenous container solves the problem of retrieving objects later by allowing you to find out the class of what is stored at each location in the map.
    – Rarw
    May 30, 2014 at 15:13

3 Answers 3

27

Java is a strongly typed language. In PHP or Javascript, variables don't have a strict type. However, in Java, every object and primative has a strict type. You can store mutliple types of data in an Array, but you can only get it back as an Object.

You can have an array of Objects:

Object[] objects = new Object[3];
objects[0] = "foo";
objects[1] = 5;

Note that 5 is autoboxed into new Integer(5) which is an object wrapper around the integer 5.

However, if you want to get data out of the array, you can only get it as an Object. The following won't work:

int i1 = objects[1]; // Won't work.
Integer i2 = objects[2]; // Also won't work.

You have to get it back as an Object:

Object o = objects[0]; // Will work.

However, now you can't get back the original form. You could try a dangerous cast:

String s = (String) o;

However you don't know that o is a String.

You can check with instanceof:

String s = null;

if (o instanceof String)
    s = (String) o;
1
  • This will certainly work but you're going to have to instanceof every item you get from the array, requiring a conditional as long as the number of object types stored in the array.
    – Rarw
    May 30, 2014 at 16:17
4

You could use an object array but that creates problems when the time comes to retrieve the objects you have stored. Instead I would use a typesafe heterogenous container as described in Effective Java (and linked to earlier in this sentence).

public class DateStuff{

    private Map<Class<?>, Object> dateMap =
        new HashMap<Class<?>, Object>();

    public <T> void putDate(Class<T> type, T instance){
          if(type == null)
              throw new NullPointerException("Type null");
          dateMap.put(type, instance);
    } 

    public<T> getDate(Class<T> type){
          return type.cast(dateMap.get(type));
    }

}

The typesafe heterogenous container solves the problem of retrieving objects later by mapping objects by their class. In your case I would combine this with other data structures - for example List<Date>, List<String>, or List<Integer>, as the base classes to provide a way to store multiple different kinds of objects in one collection. Then to retrieve values you would simply get the sub collection, e.g. a List<Date>, knowing that all items contained therein were of the same class.

0

This post is meant to be a simpler one

You can use the built-in Object class to create an array that supports Strings, Integers, etc.

Example:

Object[] x = {"Item 1", 2, null, true};
1
  • 1
    yea but how would you get the value out of it later? Feb 7, 2021 at 7:39

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