1

From RFC 6749 section 4.2.2.1:

If the resource owner denies the access request or if the request fails for reasons other than a missing or invalid redirection URI, the authorization server informs the client by adding the following parameters to the fragment component of the redirection URI

From RFC 6749 section 4.1.2.1:

If the resource owner denies the access request or if the request fails for reasons other than a missing or invalid redirection URI, the authorization server informs the client by adding the following parameters to the query component of the redirection URI

The former applies to Implicit Grant flow requests to the Authorization Endpoint; the latter applies to Authorization Code flow requests to the Authorization Endpoint. The difference is indicated by the response_type parameter the client sends to the Authorization Endpoint; token indicates Implicit flow, and code indicates Authorization Code flow. Therefore, if an error occurs, the logic is as follows:

if response_type == 'token'
  error response in fragment
else if response_type == 'code'
  error response in query string
else
  ????????????????????
end

The spec appears to leave it open what to do in the final "else". A possible client error would be to include a response_type parameter with a value other than code or token. This may not meet the criteria for an un-redirectable error, so an authorization server should redirect to the redirect_uri if possible with a suitable error response (error=invalid_request or possibly error=unsupported_response_type).

But where does that error parameter go? Query component or fragment? Both? Should this after all be treated as a non-redirectable error like an invalid redirect_uri?

2

Reading RFC 6749 carefully, it can be found that a client can access the authorization endpoint without having registered its redirect URI(s) in advance if some conditions meet. The conditions are (1) confidential, (2) implicit and (3) explicit redirect_uri parameter. In this case, response_type needs to be determined before redirect_uri is determined. This means that there is a case where unsupported_response_type error cannot be reported to the client by redirect. So, we don't always have to report unsupported_response_type error by redirect (because we cannot do it in this case).

If I were you, I would just send "400 Bad Request" to the client with an error message. IMHO, clients that cannot specify even response_type correctly are unqualified to receive responses via redirect and should be notified earlier of such a basic error during their early development phases.

1
  • This is the same judgment I came to. Thanks for the answer! – gregates Jun 4 '14 at 18:21

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