35

I heard there is a possibility to enable google-test TestCase classes friends to my classes, thus enabling tests to access my private/protected members.

How to accomplish that?

37

Try this (straight from Google Test docs...):

FRIEND_TEST(TestCaseName, TestName);

For example:

// foo.h
#include <gtest/gtest_prod.h>

// Defines FRIEND_TEST.
class Foo {
  ...
 private:
  FRIEND_TEST(FooTest, BarReturnsZeroOnNull);
  int Bar(void* x);
};

// foo_test.cc
...
TEST(FooTest, BarReturnsZeroOnNull) {
  Foo foo;
  EXPECT_EQ(0, foo.Bar(NULL));
  // Uses Foo's private member Bar().
}
  • 1
    What about if I have another test for instance BarReturnsOneOnSth. Do I have to add another FRIEND_TEST declaration for that test too? – pajton Mar 7 '10 at 13:41
  • 2
    Yes. Each test is technically a class, and you need to befriend them one at a time. – hobbit Mar 7 '10 at 13:48
  • 26
    How can I do it in a way which does not force me to include googletest header files in the header file with class Foo? – quant_dev Dec 12 '11 at 17:07
  • 1
    @quant_dev: Refer to Ralfizzle's answer for doing it without including it the gtest header. – Jatin Kumar Oct 7 '15 at 0:10
  • 1
    Note that test and to be tested class have to be in the same namespace, as explained in googletest gtest_prod.h – zeeMonkeez Oct 21 '18 at 21:40
25

I know this is old but I was searching for the same answer today. "gtest_prod.h" just introduces a simple macro to reference test classes.

#define FRIEND_TEST(test_case_name, test_name)\
friend class test_case_name##_##test_name##_Test

So FRIEND_TEST(FooTest, BarReturnsZeroOnNull); is equivalent to:

friend class FooTest_BarReturnsZeroOnNull_Test;

This works because each test is its own class as mentioned in the previous answer.

  • @DaveRuske Please do not explain your edit in the edit itself. That's what the edit summary is for. If the problem is the 6 character limit, you can add a <!----> somewhere in the body (<!----> is a comment and will therefore not be visible). – Donald Duck Apr 18 '17 at 17:06
5

A far better strategy is to not allow friend tests among your unit tests.

Allowing friend tests accessing private members will lead to a code base that is hard to maintain. Tests that break whenever a component's inner implementation details are refactored is not what you want. If extra effort is instead put into getting a design where components can be tested through their public interface, you will get tests that only need updating whenever the public interface of a component is updated.

Tests relying on gtest/gtest_prod.h should be seen as a sign of poor design.

  • 2
    I understand that this is controversial (hopefully it earned you some kind of "controversial answer" badge <grin>), but I am glad someone brought up this viewpoint. Many agree with @Martin on this! dzone.com/articles/principles-creating – pestophagous Jul 27 '17 at 23:15
  • 1
    This is true in general, but for UI testing (thinking of QT) you'll often want to get at child widgets that wouldn't normally be exposed. For example I need to check that when a button is pressed a widget becomes visible. The widget normally would not be exposed publicly. – CaptRespect Jun 12 '18 at 18:05
0

When your tested class and your test class are in a different namespace (e.g. your tests are in the global namespace), you may need to forward-declare your test class and to add your namespace prefix in FRIEND_TEST:

// foo.h
#include <gtest/gtest_prod.h>

class FooTest_BarReturnsZeroOnNull_Test;

// Defines FRIEND_TEST.
class my_namespace::Foo {
  ...
 private:
  FRIEND_TEST(::FooTest, BarReturnsZeroOnNull);
  int Bar(void* x);
};

// foo_test.cc
using namespace my_namespace;

...
TEST(FooTest, BarReturnsZeroOnNull) {
  Foo foo;
  EXPECT_EQ(0, foo.Bar(NULL));
  // Uses Foo's private member Bar().
}

I know that friend unit tests (or the friendliness in C++ in general) and white-box testing are a controversial subject, but when you work on complex, scientific algorithms, each step of which you need to test and validate, but that you don't want to expose in public (or even protected) interfaces, friend tests appear to me as a simple and pragmatic solution, especially in a test-driven development approach. It is always possible to refactor the code later (or to completely remove white-box tests) if it's against one's religion to use friendliness or white-box testing.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.