I have two pieces of C++ code running on 2 different cores. Both of them write to the same file.

How to use OpenMP and make sure there is no crash?

up vote 38 down vote accepted

You want the OMP_SET_LOCK/OMP_UNSET_LOCK functions: https://computing.llnl.gov/tutorials/openMP/#OMP_SET_LOCK. Basically:

omp_lock_t writelock;

omp_init_lock(&writelock);

#pragma omp parallel for
for ( i = 0; i < x; i++ )
{
    // some stuff
   omp_set_lock(&writelock);
    // one thread at a time stuff
    omp_unset_lock(&writelock);
    // some stuff
}

omp_destroy_lock(&writelock);

Most locking routines such as pthreads semaphores and sysv semaphores work on that sort of logic, although the specific API calls are different.

For the benefit of those coming after, using critical is another option. You can even make named critical sections.

For example:

#include <omp.h>

void myParallelFunction()
{
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for(int i=0;i<1000;++i)
    {

        // some expensive work 

        #pragma omp critical LogUpdate
        {
            // critical section where you update file        
        }

        // other work

        #pragma omp critical LogUpdate
        {
            // critical section where you update file      
        }
    }
} 

Edit: There's a great thread in the comments initiated by Victor Eijkhout. Summarizing and paraphrasing: In short critical locks a code segment. That can be overkill in more complex examples where all you want to do is lock a specific data item. It's important to understand this before you make a choice between the two methods.

  • 6
    Critical locks a code segment. That's not a good idea if you have thousands of iterations and you simply want to make sure that no two threads execute the same iteration simultaneously. Using critical means that only one thread does any iteration. Named critical sections alleviates this problem a little, but locks are more flexible since they lock a data element, not a code fragment. – Victor Eijkhout Jul 29 '14 at 16:49
  • @VictorEijkhout Sorry, I do not understand how different this solution is from @user257111. To me, replacing #pragma omp critical with lock and unlock would lead to exactly same code in this example, wouldn't it? – rkioji May 23 at 9:08
  • @rkioji The original question never specified what the code was that needed exclusive execution, so it's hard to decide what is appropriate here. Take a database as an example. With a lock you can lock a single item in the database, to make sure no two processes update it simultaneously: lock protects a specific data item. On the other hand, if you put a critical section around the update, you make sure that no two processes can do the update statement simultaneously, regardless of what they update. So in the case of a database, a critical section is overkill. (stackoverflow limit reached.) – Victor Eijkhout May 24 at 10:51
  • @VictorEijkhout I agree with you. Locking the data sounds more efficient in some situations. What I tried to say is that using omp critical or lock/unlock leads to same performance in the example given in this answer. – rkioji May 24 at 11:20
  • 1
    These are great points that I wasn't aware of back when I wrote this. I've edited the answer to summarize. – Chris A. May 24 at 20:27
#pragma omp critical
{
    // write to file here
}
  • Works only for code in a parallelized loop or structure – CharlesB May 6 '11 at 5:19

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