132

I am trying to write a paper in IPython notebook, but encountered some issues with display format. Say I have following dataframe df, is there any way to format var1 and var2 into 2 digit decimals and var3 into percentages.

       var1        var2         var3    
id                                              
0    1.458315    1.500092   -0.005709   
1    1.576704    1.608445   -0.005122    
2    1.629253    1.652577   -0.004754    
3    1.669331    1.685456   -0.003525   
4    1.705139    1.712096   -0.003134   
5    1.740447    1.741961   -0.001223   
6    1.775980    1.770801   -0.001723    
7    1.812037    1.799327   -0.002013    
8    1.853130    1.822982   -0.001396    
9    1.943985    1.868401    0.005732

The numbers inside are not multiplied by 100, e.g. -0.0057=-0.57%.

2
  • 2
    In case if anyone is looking at this question after 2014, look at my answer for a concise answer. Commented May 20, 2019 at 21:35
  • 1
    The answers work for immediate formatting, but I was hoping to "attach" the format to the column so that I could continue doing other stuff with the dataframe and it would always print that column in that format (unless I reset the format to something else). Is this possible?
    – krubo
    Commented Jul 22, 2019 at 15:48

12 Answers 12

208

The accepted answer suggests to modify the raw data for presentation purposes, something you generally do not want. Imagine you need to make further analyses with these columns and you need the precision you lost with rounding.

You can modify the formatting of individual columns in data frames, in your case:

output = df.to_string(formatters={
    'var1': '{:,.2f}'.format,
    'var2': '{:,.2f}'.format,
    'var3': '{:,.2%}'.format
})
print(output)

For your information '{:,.2%}'.format(0.214) yields 21.40%, so no need for multiplying by 100.

You don't have a nice HTML table anymore but a text representation. If you need to stay with HTML use the to_html function instead.

from IPython.core.display import display, HTML
output = df.to_html(formatters={
    'var1': '{:,.2f}'.format,
    'var2': '{:,.2f}'.format,
    'var3': '{:,.2%}'.format
})
display(HTML(output))

Update

As of pandas 0.17.1, life got easier and we can get a beautiful html table right away:

df.style.format({
    'var1': '{:,.2f}'.format,
    'var2': '{:,.2f}'.format,
    'var3': '{:,.2%}'.format,
})
10
  • 1
    If you have n or a variable amount of columns in your dataframe and you want to apply the same formatting across all columns, but you may not know all the column headers in advance, you don't have to put the formatters in a dictionary, you can do a list and do it creatively like this: output = df.to_html(formatters=n * ['{:,.2%}'.format])
    – Afflatus
    Commented Aug 5, 2016 at 20:47
  • 3
    The parts .format are not needed, you may omit them.
    – MarianD
    Commented Feb 2, 2020 at 11:33
  • 7
    df.style.format({'var3': '{:,.2%}'}) - this is not working. Values remain unchanged i.e. without %
    – zwornik
    Commented Apr 2, 2020 at 11:38
  • 3
    @zwornik % needs to be outside the brackets in '{:.2f}%'
    – theFrok
    Commented Jun 3, 2020 at 16:13
  • 1
    Ahhh, figured it out as per one of the comments below : very important, you need to assign a df to the formated df. It is not an option you can set on an existing df. eg: df = df.style.format({'perc count': '{:,.2}%'})
    – GenDemo
    Commented May 29, 2023 at 23:16
69

You could also set the default format for float :

pd.options.display.float_format = '{:.2%}'.format

Use '{:.2%}' instead of '{:.2f}%' - The former converts 0.41 to 41.00% (correctly), the latter to 0.41% (incorrectly)

4
  • 3
    Good to know and relevant to OP's question about outputting in an python notebook
    – Jim
    Commented Oct 9, 2015 at 18:04
  • 3
    And if the percentages are still given in decimals (e.g. when using df.pct_change()): pd.options.display.float_format = '{:.2%}'.format Commented Jun 23, 2018 at 19:51
  • 1
    of course this would affect all of your dataframes, so you'd have to unset it again to display non-percentage floats. Commented May 18, 2023 at 2:44
  • 1
    As per @fantabolous ' comment, this is not really useful.
    – GenDemo
    Commented May 29, 2023 at 23:10
49

replace the values using the round function, and format the string representation of the percentage numbers:

df['var2'] = pd.Series([round(val, 2) for val in df['var2']], index = df.index)
df['var3'] = pd.Series(["{0:.2f}%".format(val * 100) for val in df['var3']], index = df.index)

The round function rounds a floating point number to the number of decimal places provided as second argument to the function.

String formatting allows you to represent the numbers as you wish. You can change the number of decimal places shown by changing the number before the f.

p.s. I was not sure if your 'percentage' numbers had already been multiplied by 100. If they have then clearly you will want to change the number of decimals displayed, and remove the hundred multiplication.

8
  • 2
    Thanks, will this change the actual values within each column? Commented Jun 1, 2014 at 17:02
  • 1
    To round the values in a series you can also just use df['var2'].round(2) Commented Jun 17, 2014 at 16:19
  • 4
    You could also set the default format for float : pd.options.display.float_format = '{:.2f}%'.format Commented May 15, 2015 at 21:03
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    @romain That's a great suggestion (for some use-cases) it should be its own answer (so I can upvote it) Though it does need tweak to multiply by 100. Commented Jul 28, 2015 at 2:39
  • 1
    Is there a way to display a column as percentage without converting it to a string?
    – DISC-O
    Commented Jun 9, 2020 at 19:15
43

Often times we are interested in calculating the full significant digits, but for the visual aesthetics, we may want to see only few decimal point when we display the dataframe.

In jupyter-notebook, pandas can utilize the html formatting taking advantage of the method called style.

For the case of just seeing two significant digits of some columns, we can use this code snippet:

Given dataframe

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame({'var1': [1.458315, 1.576704, 1.629253, 1.6693310000000001, 1.705139, 1.740447, 1.77598, 1.812037, 1.85313, 1.9439849999999999],
          'var2': [1.500092, 1.6084450000000001, 1.652577, 1.685456, 1.7120959999999998, 1.741961, 1.7708009999999998, 1.7993270000000001, 1.8229819999999999, 1.8684009999999998],
          'var3': [-0.0057090000000000005, -0.005122, -0.0047539999999999995, -0.003525, -0.003134, -0.0012230000000000001, -0.0017230000000000001, -0.002013, -0.001396, 0.005732]})

print(df)
       var1      var2      var3
0  1.458315  1.500092 -0.005709
1  1.576704  1.608445 -0.005122
2  1.629253  1.652577 -0.004754
3  1.669331  1.685456 -0.003525
4  1.705139  1.712096 -0.003134
5  1.740447  1.741961 -0.001223
6  1.775980  1.770801 -0.001723
7  1.812037  1.799327 -0.002013
8  1.853130  1.822982 -0.001396
9  1.943985  1.868401  0.005732

Style to get required format

    df.style.format({'var1': "{:.2f}",'var2': "{:.2f}",'var3': "{:.2%}"})

Gives:

     var1   var2    var3
id          
0   1.46    1.50    -0.57%
1   1.58    1.61    -0.51%
2   1.63    1.65    -0.48%
3   1.67    1.69    -0.35%
4   1.71    1.71    -0.31%
5   1.74    1.74    -0.12%
6   1.78    1.77    -0.17%
7   1.81    1.80    -0.20%
8   1.85    1.82    -0.14%
9   1.94    1.87    0.57%

Update

If display command is not found try following:

from IPython.display import display

df_style = df.style.format({'var1': "{:.2f}",'var2': "{:.2f}",'var3': "{:.2%}"})

display(df_style)

Requirements

  • To use display command, you need to have installed Ipython in your machine.
  • The display command does not work in online python interpreter which do not have IPyton installed such as https://repl.it/languages/python3
  • The display command works in jupyter-notebook, jupyter-lab, Google-colab, kaggle-kernels, IBM-watson,Mode-Analytics and many other platforms out of the box, you do not even have to import display from IPython.display
8
  • This is the most Pythonic answer.
    – FuzzyDuck
    Commented May 20, 2019 at 14:14
  • 1
    This is a way better answer than the accepted one. Changing the formatting is much preferable to actually changing the underlying values.
    – philippjfr
    Commented Sep 15, 2019 at 19:30
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    @Poudel This is not working. I have used exacly the same code as yours and var3 is not formatted as percentage
    – zwornik
    Commented Apr 2, 2020 at 11:25
  • 1
    @zwornik try display(df.style.format({'var1': "{:.2f}",'var2': "{:.2f}",'var3': "{:.2%}"})) Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 1:31
  • @Poudel It worked now. There is one superflous bracket at the end. It should be: df_style = df.style.format({'var1': "{:.2f}",'var2': "{:.2f}",'var3': "{:.2%}"}) Thanks!
    – zwornik
    Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 7:01
28

As suggested by @linqu you should not change your data for presentation. Since pandas 0.17.1, (conditional) formatting was made easier. Quoting the documentation:

You can apply conditional formatting, the visual styling of a DataFrame depending on the data within, by using the DataFrame.style property. This is a property that returns a pandas.Styler object, which has useful methods for formatting and displaying DataFrames.

For your example, that would be (the usual table will show up in Jupyter):

df.style.format({
    'var1': '{:,.2f}'.format,
    'var2': '{:,.2f}'.format,
    'var3': '{:,.2%}'.format,
})
2
  • 4
    This is not working. I have used exacly the same code as yours
    – zwornik
    Commented Apr 2, 2020 at 11:32
  • 1
    this will give html output, and be useful for notebooks. for terminal output, printing to files etc, the to_string method is good. It needs pandas version 1.5 or higher.
    – LudvigH
    Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 10:27
18

Just another way of doing it should you require to do it over a larger range of columns

using applymap

df[['var1','var2']] = df[['var1','var2']].applymap("{0:.2f}".format)
df['var3'] = df['var3'].applymap(lambda x: "{0:.2f}%".format(x*100))

applymap is useful if you need to apply the function over multiple columns; it's essentially an abbreviation of the below for this specific example:

df[['var1','var2']].apply(lambda x: map(lambda x:'{:.2f}%'.format(x),x),axis=1)

Great explanation below of apply, map applymap:

Difference between map, applymap and apply methods in Pandas

8

As a similar approach to the accepted answer that might be considered a bit more readable, elegant, and general (YMMV), you can leverage the map method:

# OP example
df['var3'].map(lambda n: '{:,.2%}'.format(n))

# also works on a series
series_example.map(lambda n: '{:,.2%}'.format(n))

Performance-wise, this is pretty close (marginally slower) than the OP solution.

As an aside, if you do choose to go the pd.options.display.float_format route, consider using a context manager to handle state per this parallel numpy example.

6

style.format is vectorized, so we can simply apply it to the entire df (or just its numerical columns):

df[num_cols].style.format('{:,.3f}%')


Note that if df contains only 1 column and is in fact a Series, it will first require conversion to pandas DataFrame, e.g. with pd.DataFrame(df[num_col]).style.format, or as pointed below: df[num_col].to_frame().style.format).

1
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    The series should be converted to data frame first: df[num_cols].to_frame().style.format('{:,.3f}%')
    – Sahar
    Commented Feb 12, 2021 at 13:59
0

The list comprehension has an assured result, I'm using it successfully I think you may use python list comprehension as follow:

df['var1'] = ["{:.2f}".format(i) for i in df['var1'] ]
df['var2'] = ["{:.2f}".format(i) for i in df['var2'] ]
df['var3'] = ["{:.2%}".format(i) for i in df['var3'] ]

Thanks

0

Following from this answer I used the apply function on the given series. In my case, I was interested in showing value_counts for my Series with percentage formatting.

I did:

df['my_col'].value_counts(normalize=True).apply(lambda x: "{0:.2f}%".format(x*100))
# Incident             88.16%
# StreetWorks          3.29% 
# Accident             2.36%
# ... 

Instead of just

df['my_col'].value_counts(normalize=True)
# Incident             0.881634
# StreetWorks          0.032856
# Accident             0.023589
# ...
0

If all the columns of type float should be shown as percentages, you can use a with statement:

with pd.option_context("display.float_format", "{:.2%}".format):
    display(df)

If only specific columns should be formatted as percentages:

df.style.format(formatter={c: "{:.2%}" for c in ["column_1", "column_2"]})
0

I've had this problem with a correlation matrix:

# this matrix has 2 decimals
correlation_matrix = round(numeric_columns.corr(),2)

# but when I Apply a gradient color scheme to the correlation matrix it prints 6 decimals.
styled_matrix = correlation_matrix.style.background_gradient(cmap='RdYlGn', vmin=-1, vmax=1)

# so instead, I need to add this format(precision=2) into the statement as such to format all of the columns with that precision
styled_matrix = correlation_matrix.style.format(precision=2).background_gradient(cmap='RdYlGn', vmin=-1, vmax=1)

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