All numbers that divide evenly into x.

I put in 4 it returns: 4, 2, 1

edit: I know it sounds homeworky. I'm writing a little app to populate some product tables with semi random test data. Two of the properties are ItemMaximum and Item Multiplier. I need to make sure that the multiplier does not create an illogical situation where buying 1 more item would put the order over the maximum allowed. Thus the factors will give a list of valid values for my test data.

edit++: This is what I went with after all the help from everyone. Thanks again!

edit#: I wrote 3 different versions to see which I liked better and tested them against factoring small numbers and very large numbers. I'll paste the results.

static IEnumerable<int> GetFactors2(int n)
{
    return from a in Enumerable.Range(1, n)
                  where n % a == 0
                  select a;                      
}

private IEnumerable<int> GetFactors3(int x)
{            
    for (int factor = 1; factor * factor <= x; factor++)
    {
        if (x % factor == 0)
        {
            yield return factor;
            if (factor * factor != x)
                yield return x / factor;
        }
    }
}

private IEnumerable<int> GetFactors1(int x)
{
    int max = (int)Math.Ceiling(Math.Sqrt(x));
    for (int factor = 1; factor < max; factor++)
    {
        if(x % factor == 0)
        {
            yield return factor;
            if(factor != max)
                yield return x / factor;
        }
    }
}

In ticks. When factoring the number 20, 5 times each:

  • GetFactors1-5,445,881
  • GetFactors2-4,308,234
  • GetFactors3-2,913,659

When factoring the number 20000, 5 times each:

  • GetFactors1-5,644,457
  • GetFactors2-12,117,938
  • GetFactors3-3,108,182
  • 1
    You do know, I hope, that there isn't a general high-performance solution known to his problem. Modern cryptography relies on there being no such solution. – Steve McLeod Oct 27 '08 at 14:04
  • Yes, but I wasn't sure if there was a better way of doing it than simply testing the numbers one by one, it's been awhile since I sat through a math class. – Echostorm Oct 27 '08 at 14:09
  • related question in python – tzot Oct 9 '10 at 1:48
  • a simple winform app which can be helpful findingnumberfactors.codeplex.com – Iman Abidi Apr 7 '12 at 12:33

11 Answers 11

up vote 35 down vote accepted

pseudocode:

  • Loop from 1 to the square root of the number, call the index "i".
  • if number mod i is 0, add i and number / i to the list of factors.

realocode:

public List<int> Factor(int number) {
    List<int> factors = new List<int>();
    int max = (int)Math.Sqrt(number);  //round down
    for(int factor = 1; factor <= max; ++factor) { //test from 1 to the square root, or the int below it, inclusive.
        if(number % factor == 0) {
            factors.Add(factor);
            if(factor != number/factor) { // Don't add the square root twice!  Thanks Jon
                factors.Add(number/factor);
            }
        }
    }
    return factors;
}

As Jon Skeet mentioned, you could implement this as an IEnumerable<int> as well - use yield instead of adding to a list. The advantage with List<int> is that it could be sorted before return if required. Then again, you could get a sorted enumerator with a hybrid approach, yielding the first factor and storing the second one in each iteration of the loop, then yielding each value that was stored in reverse order.

You will also want to do something to handle the case where a negative number passed into the function.

  • One extra check to add - the above will add 2 twice :) – Jon Skeet Oct 27 '08 at 13:43
  • Math.Sqrt returns a double. Also, that needs to be rounded up. Try using 20 as an example. – Echostorm Oct 27 '08 at 13:54
  • Rather than taking the square root, you can restructure the loop: for(int factor = 1; factor*factor <= number; ++factor) – Mark Ransom Oct 27 '08 at 16:42
  • True - and I would imagine there is a point past which performance would degrade for that, since you are calculating it on each loop? It is probably not as significant as other parts of the loop. Benchmarking would have to be performed, I suppose. – Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 27 '08 at 17:26
  • cool idea Mark. you have to test against factor * factor != x when you're yielding tho. – Echostorm Oct 27 '08 at 17:52

The % (remainder) operator is the one to use here. If x % y == 0 then x is divisible by y. (Assuming 0 < y <= x)

I'd personally implement this as a method returning an IEnumerable<int> using an iterator block.

  • % is actually the modulus operator , not "remainder". The IEnumerable<int> block has an upper limit which makes this practical for factoring 'small' (computational) numbers. – Kraang Prime Aug 17 '16 at 19:51
  • @SamuelJackson: The C# 5 language specification section 5.8.3 and Eric Lippert's blog post disagree. Your MSDN reference is to JScript, not C#. – Jon Skeet Aug 17 '16 at 19:54
  • @SamuelJackson: (And given that that MSDN page talks about "The modulus, or remainder, operator", it looks a little broken anyway, as if it thinks the two are equivalent...) – Jon Skeet Aug 17 '16 at 20:02
  • See C# Operators - under section Multiplicative Operators it is named "modulus" and under Assignment and Lambda Operators, it states "modulus assignment. Divide the value of x by the value of y, store the remainder in x, and return the new value." While modulus calculation is technically what remains after all possible divisions of the divisor, the correct mathematics term for this operation (and in c# documentation) is modulus, some refer to it as modulo. :) – Kraang Prime Aug 18 '16 at 2:19
  • While the term "remainder" can be used, the operator is "modulus" and the result of the calculation is the remainder after all divisions are complete as a whole number. Minor technicality, but it is not uncommon (as you can see from some of Micrososft's documentation) for even those skilled to confuse the terminology between the result of this calculation, and the operator itself.. – Kraang Prime Aug 18 '16 at 2:24

Very late but the accepted answer (a while back) didn't not give the correct results.

Thanks to Merlyn, I got now got the reason for the square as a 'max' below the corrected sample. althought the answer from Echostorm seems more complete.

    public static IEnumerable<uint> getFactors(uint x)
    {
        for (uint i = 1; i*i <= x; i++)
        {
            if (0 == (x % i))
            {
                yield return i;
                if (i != (x / i))
                {
                    yield return x / i;
                }
            }
        }
    }
  • 1
    Need to add the following after the for loop to return x itself. A number is always a factor of itself. yield return x; – SFun28 Mar 10 '14 at 21:36
  • I think whatever might have been wrong before is correct now. The reason it stops at the square root is because it already has gone through the possible factors below the square root (would be required in order to multiple by any numbers above "max"), as well as any numbers above the square root (since it outputs both itself and the number it is multiplied by to get the result). The maximum possible value that wouldn't be output yet when outputting both sides of the pair in each loop iteration is the square root. – Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 17 '15 at 9:18
  • 1
    For example, if you get the factors of 81, then loop iterations between 10 and 40 are wasted. You've already output 27 when you output 3, and if you didn't output both sides, you would never get 81 as a factor if you stopped at 81/2 (40). – Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 17 '15 at 9:23
  • Cheers! indeed it makes sense now. – call me Steve Sep 11 '15 at 21:11

As extension methods:

    public static bool Divides(this int potentialFactor, int i)
    {
        return i % potentialFactor == 0;
    }

    public static IEnumerable<int> Factors(this int i)
    {
        return from potentialFactor in Enumerable.Range(1, i)
               where potentialFactor.Divides(i)
               select potentialFactor;
    }

Here's an example of usage:

        foreach (int i in 4.Factors())
        {
            Console.WriteLine(i);
        }

Note that I have optimized for clarity, not for performance. For large values of i this algorithm can take a long time.

Here it is again, only counting to the square root, as others mentioned. I suppose that people are attracted to that idea if you're hoping to improve performance. I'd rather write elegant code first, and optimize for performance later, after testing my software.

Still, for reference, here it is:

    public static bool Divides(this int potentialFactor, int i)
    {
        return i % potentialFactor == 0;
    }

    public static IEnumerable<int> Factors(this int i)
    {
        foreach (int result in from potentialFactor in Enumerable.Range(1, (int)Math.Sqrt(i))
                               where potentialFactor.Divides(i)
                               select potentialFactor)
        {
            yield return result;
            if (i / result != result)
            {
                yield return i / result;
            }
        }
    }

Not only is the result considerably less readable, but the factors come out of order this way, too.

  • Why not just edit the old answer? – Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 27 '08 at 13:54
  • 2
    Because they are two different answers, with differing merit. – Jay Bazuzi Oct 27 '08 at 15:08

Another LINQ style and tying to keep the O(sqrt(n)) complexity

        static IEnumerable<int> GetFactors(int n)
        {
            Debug.Assert(n >= 1);
            var pairList = from i in Enumerable.Range(1, (int)(Math.Round(Math.Sqrt(n) + 1)))
                    where n % i == 0
                    select new { A = i, B = n / i };

            foreach(var pair in pairList)
            {
                yield return pair.A;
                yield return pair.B;
            }


        }

I did it the lazy way. I don't know much, but I've been told that simplicity can sometimes imply elegance. This is one possible way to do it:

    public static IEnumerable<int> GetDivisors(int number)
    {
        var searched = Enumerable.Range(1, number)
             .Where((x) =>  number % x == 0)
             .Select(x => number / x);

        foreach (var s in searched)          
            yield return s;
    }

EDIT: As Kraang Prime pointed out, this function cannot exceed the limit of an integer and is (admittedly) not the most efficient way to handle this problem.

  • This can only process for factors up to the limit of integer. – Kraang Prime Aug 17 '16 at 19:47
  • @spencer Just curious as to why you are using yield return in a foreach loop as you already have an IEnumerable<int> why not just return the result of you Linq query instead of assigning it to searched? – Rodney S. Foley Apr 6 '17 at 16:58

Wouldn't it also make sense to start at 2 and head towards an upper limit value that's continuously being recalculated based on the number you've just checked? See N/i (where N is the Number you're trying to find the factor of and i is the current number to check...) Ideally, instead of mod, you would use a divide function that returns N/i as well as any remainder it might have. That way you're performing one divide operation to recreate your upper bound as well as the remainder you'll check for even division.

Math.DivRem http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/wwc1t3y1.aspx

If you use doubles, the following works: use a for loop iterating from 1 up to the number you want to factor. In each iteration, divide the number to be factored by i. If (number / i) % 1 == 0, then i is a factor, as is the quotient of number / i. Put one or both of these in a list, and you have all of the factors.

And one more solution. Not sure if it has any advantages other than being readable..:

List<int> GetFactors(int n)
{
    var f = new List<int>() { 1 };  // adding trivial factor, optional
    int m = n;
    int i = 2;
    while (m > 1)
    {
        if (m % i == 0)
        {
            f.Add(i);
            m /= i;
        }
        else i++;
    }
    // f.Add(n);   // adding trivial factor, optional
    return f;
}
  • I'd recommend providing more descriptive variable names to further enhance the readability. – EnterTheCode Sep 12 at 19:58

Linq solution:

IEnumerable<int> GetFactors(int n)
{
  Debug.Assert(n >= 1);
  return from i in Enumerable.Range(1, n)
         where n % i == 0
         select i;
}
  • This is wrong - it only returns half of them. – Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 27 '08 at 13:41
  • This only gets you the first 1/2 of factors. e.g., for 10, it would return 1 and 2, but not 5 and 10. – Jay Bazuzi Oct 27 '08 at 13:41
  • Suggested change: Math.Sqrt will return a double, which won't work with Enumerable.Range. Also that won't return 4 - just 1 and 2. – Jon Skeet Oct 27 '08 at 13:42

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