82

Apparently a colon is used in multiple ways in Java. Would anyone mind explaining what it does?

For instance here:

String cardString = "";
for (PlayingCard c : this.list)  // <--
{
    cardString += c + "\n";
}

How would you write this for-each loop a different way so as to not incorporate the :?

12 Answers 12

181

There are several places colon is used in Java code:

1) Jump-out label (Tutorial):

label: for (int i = 0; i < x; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < i; j++) {
        if (something(i, j)) break label; // jumps out of the i loop
    }
} 
// i.e. jumps to here

2) Ternary condition (Tutorial):

int a = (b < 4)? 7: 8; // if b < 4, set a to 7, else set a to 8

3) For-each loop (Tutorial):

String[] ss = {"hi", "there"}
for (String s: ss) {
    print(s); // output "hi" , and "there" on the next iteration
}

4) Assertion (Guide):

int a = factorial(b);
assert a >= 0: "factorial may not be less than 0"; // throws an AssertionError with the message if the condition evaluates to false

5) Case in switch statement (Tutorial):

switch (type) {
    case WHITESPACE:
    case RETURN:
        break;
    case NUMBER:
        print("got number: " + value);
        break;
    default:
        print("syntax error");
}

6) Method references (Tutorial)

class Person {
   public static int compareByAge(Person a, Person b) {
       return a.birthday.compareTo(b.birthday);
   }}
}

Arrays.sort(persons, Person::compareByAge);
  • 3
    nice - I missed a few! and I didn't even know you can name assertions like that, very useful. – Claudiu Mar 8 '10 at 6:22
  • Coming from .NET (C#), the closest analogy for the structure in question would be the for-each, which you explained in a good manner. – Roger Sep 6 '12 at 7:41
  • 2
    A failed assert does not "quit the program". It throws an AssertionError. It will only cause the program to exit if it is thrown on the stack of the only remaining non-daemon thread ... and not caught. – Stephen C Jun 13 '14 at 8:09
  • if you aim to include all, then I would add double colon (::) operator – kiedysktos Jun 23 '15 at 6:50
  • 1
    Also, a double colon is used in method references. – Daniel M. Apr 14 '16 at 3:37
34

There is no "colon" operator, but the colon appears in two places:

1: In the ternary operator, e.g.:

int x = bigInt ? 10000 : 50;

In this case, the ternary operator acts as an 'if' for expressions. If bigInt is true, then x will get 10000 assigned to it. If not, 50. The colon here means "else".

2: In a for-each loop:

double[] vals = new double[100];
//fill x with values
for (double x : vals) {
    //do something with x
}

This sets x to each of the values in 'vals' in turn. So if vals contains [10, 20.3, 30, ...], then x will be 10 on the first iteration, 20.3 on the second, etc.

Note: I say it's not an operator because it's just syntax. It can't appear in any given expression by itself, and it's just chance that both the for-each and the ternary operator use a colon.

  • second half helped, this should be the real answer – erp Aug 14 '14 at 15:59
  • +1 for the more verbose explanation of what it's doing in for-each loop. – dfarrell07 Sep 15 '14 at 18:05
17

Just to add, when used in a for-each loop, the ":" can basically be read as "in".

So

for (String name : names) {
    // remainder omitted
}

should be read "For each name IN names do ..."

15

How would you write this for-each loop a different way so as to not incorporate the ":"?

Assuming that list is a Collection instance ...

public String toString() {
   String cardString = "";
   for (Iterator<PlayingCard> it = this.list.iterator(); it.hasNext(); /**/) {
      PlayingCard c = it.next();
      cardString = cardString + c + "\n";
   }
}

I should add the pedantic point that : is not an operator in this context. An operator performs an operation in an expression, and the stuff inside the ( ... ) in a for statement is not an expression ... according to the JLS.

  • My question is: why? Why doing the same thing the long way? – RichN Mar 8 '10 at 14:49
  • 2
    @RichN - he doesn't want to do it, he just wants to know how. – Stephen C Mar 8 '10 at 14:57
  • 3
    not homework, I want to know how to do it the long way so I can understand the logic – dukevin Feb 9 '11 at 21:03
  • Actually in my (bad) university, during computer engineering studies, they never taught us anything about the (:) in the java course, I came to learn it later by watching examples, and unfortunately, it is hard for me now to code it into my mind since I did all the projects in the uni the long way – Carlos Sanchez Mar 21 '15 at 19:08
  • You don't need to assume that list is an instance of Collection; it must be an instance of Iterable if it is able to be used in the enhanced for loop, meaning it will have the iterator() method that you call on it in your answer. – Kröw May 24 at 17:26
1

It's used in for loops to iterate over a list of objects.

for (Object o: list)
{
    // o is an element of list here
}

Think of it as a for <item> in <list> in Python.

1

In your specific case,

String cardString = "";
for (PlayingCard c : this.list)  // <--
{
    cardString = cardString + c + "\n";
}

this.list is a collection (list, set, or array), and that code assigns c to each element of the collection.

So, if this.list were a collection {"2S", "3H", "4S"} then the cardString on the end would be this string:

2S
3H
4S
  • 1
    thanks for your answer. How could this code be rewritten to not use the ":" ? – dukevin Mar 8 '10 at 6:31
1

You usually see it in the ternary assignment operator;

Syntax

variable =  `condition ? result 1 : result 2;`

example:

boolean isNegative = number > 0 ? false : true;

which is "equivalent" in nature to the if else

if(number > 0){
    isNegative = false;
}
else{
    isNegative = true;
}

Other than examples given by different posters,

you can also use : to signify a label for a block which you can use in conjunction with continue and break..

for example:

public void someFunction(){
     //an infinite loop
     goBackHere: { //label
          for(int i = 0; i < 10 ;i++){
               if(i == 9 ) continue goBackHere;
          }
     }
}
  • 2
    I'm sorry, but that is an awful example. Why wouldn't you write boolean isNegative = number > 0; Ternary conditions are good for things such as double sgn = number>0 ? 1 :0; – user44242 Mar 8 '10 at 7:48
  • @user44242 lol yes i don't even remember why I gave that example. – ultrajohn Dec 31 '15 at 12:17
  • 1
    @user44242 Showing an example like that keeps it simple and better shows how the conditional operator works. "Why wouldn't you write boolean isNegative = number > 0;" Because that doesn't demonstrate anything about the ternary operator. – Kröw May 24 at 17:31
1

It will prints the string"something" three times.

JLabel[] labels = {new JLabel(), new JLabel(), new JLabel()};                   

for ( JLabel label : labels )                  
 {              
   label.setText("something");  

 panel.add(label);             
 }
  • 1
    this is what said above as ForEach loop – P.JAYASRI Mar 20 '15 at 6:14
1

Since most for loops are very similar, Java provides a shortcut to reduce the amount of code required to write the loop called the for each loop.

Here is an example of the concise for each loop:

for (Integer grade : quizGrades){
      System.out.println(grade);
 }    

In the example above, the colon (:) can be read as "in". The for each loop altogether can be read as "for each Integer element (called grade) in quizGrades, print out the value of grade."

0

It is used in the new short hand for/loop

final List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
for (final String s : list)
{
   System.out.println(s);
}

and the ternary operator

list.isEmpty() ? true : false;
0

The colon actually exists in conjunction with ?

int minVal = (a < b) ? a : b;

is equivalent to:

int minval;
if(a < b){ minval = a;} 
else{ minval = b; }

Also in the for each loop:

for(Node n : List l){ ... }

literally:

for(Node n = l.head; n.next != null; n = n.next)
0

colon is using in for-each loop, Try this example,

import java.util.*;

class ForEachLoop
{
       public static void main(String args[])
       {`enter code here`
       Integer[] iray={1,2,3,4,5};
       String[] sray={"ENRIQUE IGLESIAS"};
       printME(iray);
       printME(sray);

       }
       public static void printME(Integer[] i)
       {           
                  for(Integer x:i)
                  {
                    System.out.println(x);
                  }
       }
       public static void printME(String[] i)
       {
                   for(String x:i)
                   {
                   System.out.println(x);
                   }
       }
}

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