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how would i convert this to return char* an not use std::string just want to learn other ways to do this without std::string

string getName(DWORD Address)
{
    DWORD BaseDword = ReadBaseDword(Address);

    int size = ReadCharSize();

    string name = "";

    for (int i = 0; i < size - 1; i++)
    {
        char c = ReadCharArrayChar(i);
        name += c;
    }

    return name;
}
  • 4
    Well... Just don't. – Baum mit Augen Jun 2 '14 at 20:02
  • By looking at the documentation for std:string. Hint: .c_str() - you'll likely want the use of strdup, too – enhzflep Jun 2 '14 at 20:03
  • why you want to do that? If you're up to return a char* you have to allocate and later deallocate memory. Plus you have to keep in mind that C strings end up with \0 null character. There's no reason to do this really. – 101010 Jun 2 '14 at 20:03
  • what's with ReadCharArrayChar[i]();? – Iosif Murariu Jun 2 '14 at 20:03
  • i didnt wanted to see other ways without std::string. I just through this together its like something im doing so ReadCharArrayChar[i](); was just a example – Nathan Jun 2 '14 at 20:07
4

The other ways are ugly, which is one of the reasons std::string exists :). But for educational purposes, here is how you could return char* (as asked):

// caller is responsible for deleting the return value
char* getEntityName(DWORD Address)
{
    DWORD BaseDword = ReadBaseDword(Address); // (not sure what this achieves)

    int size = ReadCharSize();

    char* name = new char[size];
    name[size - 1] = '\0';

    for (int i = 0; i < size - 1; i++)
    {
        char c = ReadCharArrayChar[i](); // odd looking, but I'll assume this works
        name[i] = c;
    }

    return name;
}

A similar option still uses a raw pointer for the buffer, but has the caller pass it in (along with its size):

// returns: true iff the buffer was successfully populated with the name
// exceptions might be a better choice, but let's keep things simple here
bool getEntityName(DWORD Address, char* buffer, int maxSize)
{
    DWORD BaseDword = ReadBaseDword(Address); // (not sure what this achieves?)

    int size = ReadCharSize();
    if(size > maxSize)
       return false;

    buffer[size - 1] = '\0';

    for (int i = 0; i < size - 1; i++)
    {
        char c = ReadCharArrayChar[i](); // odd looking, but I'll assume this works
        buffer[i] = c;
    }

    return true;
}

The latter option would allow, for example:

char buffer[100];
getEntityName(getAddress(), buffer, 100);
  • dont you have to delete the new char[size]? – Nathan Jun 2 '14 at 20:03
  • 2
    @Nathan The calling code will need to do that eventually. – dlf Jun 2 '14 at 20:03
  • Is that the best way to do it with std::string then? – Nathan Jun 2 '14 at 20:13
  • @Nathan do you mean without std::string? "Best" always depends on context, but it's probably what I'd do if I were forbidden from using any sort of string object. Another option would be to have the caller pass in a buffer and a max size. That would give you more flexibility in how and where the characters were stored. – dlf Jun 2 '14 at 20:16
2
char * getEntityName(DWORD Address)
{
    DWORD BaseDword = ReadBaseDword(Address);

    int size = ReadCharSize();

    char* name = malloc (size);

    for (int i = 0; i < size - 1; i++)
    {
        name[i] = ReadCharArrayChar[i]();
    }

    name[size - 1] = 0;

    return name;
}

Note that the caller should free the returned value when they're done with it. This assumes size includes the terminating zero byte, which it seems to given the example code.

  • Upvoted, but the result of the malloc will need to be explicitly cast to char*, if I recall correctly. – dlf Jun 2 '14 at 20:12
  • @dlf malloc returns a void *, so no cast is necessary. – Fiddling Bits Jun 2 '14 at 20:37
  • @FiddlingBits my compiler (VC2012) will not perform that cast implicitly. However, I've learned (here) that what my compiler will or won't do is not always the best barometer of correctness... :) – dlf Jun 2 '14 at 20:42
  • @FiddlingBits But maybe this time it's right – dlf Jun 2 '14 at 20:46
  • @dlf Should have stopped being necessary when C99 was published... I think. :-D – Fiddling Bits Jun 2 '14 at 20:48
1

If I absolutely could not use std::string, I would either use std::vector<char> for this:

std::vector<char> getName(DWORD Address)
{
    DWORD BaseDword = ReadBaseDword(Address);

    const int size = ReadCharSize();

    std::vector<char> name(size);

    for (int i = 0; i < size - 1; i++)
    {
        name[i] = ReadCharArrayChar(i);
    }

    name[size - 1] = '\0';

    return name;
}

or std::unique_ptr<char[]> if I knew the caller would never need to modify the result:

std::unique_ptr<char[]> getName(DWORD Address)
{
    DWORD BaseDword = ReadBaseDword(Address);

    const int size = ReadCharSize();

    std::unique_ptr<char[]> name(new char[size]);

    for (int i = 0; i < size - 1; i++)
    {
        name[i] = ReadCharArrayChar(i);
    }

    name[size - 1] = '\0';

    return name;
}

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