enum Suit: String {
    case spades = "♠"
    case hearts = "♥"
    case diamonds = "♦"
    case clubs = "♣"
}

For example, how can I do something like:

for suit in Suit {
    // do something with suit
    print(suit.rawValue)
}

Resulting example:

♠
♥
♦
♣
  • In what instance would you not know the type? – m.t.bennett Jun 3 '14 at 5:06
  • You are right, in this case it's String type. – Lucien Jun 3 '14 at 15:44
  • No reflection in Swift yet... – Sulthan Jun 4 '14 at 12:33
  • 4
    Isn't it ironic that they're called enumerations, but they are so painfully annoying to enumerate over in Swift? – Charlton Provatas Feb 2 at 21:11
  • 2
    @CharltonProvatas If that were the only drawback in Swift, I'd call it a day. Looking at how many people offer different workarounds for this, I'm just gnawing my keyboard. – Thomas Kilian Feb 5 at 15:42

42 Answers 42

up vote 78 down vote accepted

Swift 4.2+

Starting with Swift 4.2 (with Xcode 10), just add protocol conformance to CaseIterable to benefit from allCases:

extension Suit: CaseIterable {}

Then this will print all possible values:

Suit.allCases.forEach {
    print($0.rawValue)
}

Compatibility with earlier Swift versions (3.x and 4.x)

Just mimic the Swift 4.2 implementation:

#if !swift(>=4.2)
public protocol CaseIterable {
    associatedtype AllCases: Collection where AllCases.Element == Self
    static var allCases: AllCases { get }
}
extension CaseIterable where Self: Hashable {
    static var allCases: [Self] {
        return [Self](AnySequence { () -> AnyIterator<Self> in
            var raw = 0
            var first: Self?
            return AnyIterator {
                let current = withUnsafeBytes(of: &raw) { $0.load(as: Self.self) }
                if raw == 0 {
                    first = current
                } else if current == first {
                    return nil
                }
                raw += 1
                return current
            }
        })
    }
}
#endif
  • 1
    Thanks for the info! Right now the "mimic" variant will do. – repeat Mar 31 at 15:47
  • 1
    It crashes with custom types here ` $0.load(as: Self.self) ` Fatal error: UnsafeRawBufferPointer.load out of bounds – Dmitry Petukhov Jul 20 at 10:56
  • @DmitryPetukhov I'd be happy to help, but: (1) are you sure you got the latest version of the code? (some crash was fixed a month ago) and (2) please give an MCVE of your custom type that can reproduce a crash, and your version of Xcode. – Cœur Jul 20 at 12:16
  • Best solution by far. – Zhou Hao Aug 29 at 6:52
  • This works fine for me for debug builds, but as soon as I create a release and upload to TestFlight it crashes. Are Apple somehow stripping this out? – Daniel Wood Sep 6 at 21:43

This post is relevant here https://www.swift-studies.com/blog/2014/6/10/enumerating-enums-in-swift

Essentially the proposed solution is

enum ProductCategory : String {
     case Washers = "washers", Dryers = "dryers", Toasters = "toasters"

     static let allValues = [Washers, Dryers, Toasters]
}

for category in ProductCategory.allValues{
     //Do something
}
  • 177
    Nice, but...you have to enter your elements of the enumeration twice - once for the enumeration, once for the allValues. Not exactly as elegant as one would wish. – Jay Imerman Jun 17 '14 at 1:53
  • 1
    Agree with the "but"... however as stated in the article perhaps there is an issue that an enum is really a set and therefore unordered... mind you... order cases defined in wouldn't be a bad start! – rougeExciter Jun 17 '14 at 18:20
  • 3
    In Java the compiler does this for you, maybe Swift 2.0 will do this also. In particular in Java all enums get a description (toString in Java) method that gives the String as the case names (Washers, ...) and a Set of the cases is automatically created. Java also give you positional indexing. As I said, maybe Swift 2.0. – Howard Lovatt Jul 30 '14 at 0:16
  • 1
    Ideally you would have something similar to c# implementation in which you can do Enum.Values(typeof(FooEnum)) but exposed as an extension method (like map or reduce). FooEnum.values() :: values(EnumType -> [EnumType]) – rodrigoelp Aug 25 '14 at 0:38
  • 1
    The article makes a good point right at the end about making each enum value is in the allValues array with a unit test. However, I can still see someone adding more elements, but not enforcing them in the unit test which still leaves us back at the beginning, not knowing for sure that all enum values are kept in allValues. – DonnaLea Apr 22 '15 at 9:56

I made a utility function iterateEnum() for iterating cases for arbitrary enum types.

Here is the example usage:

enum Suit:String {
    case Spades = "♠"
    case Hearts = "♥"
    case Diamonds = "♦"
    case Clubs = "♣"
}

for f in iterateEnum(Suit) {
    println(f.rawValue)
}

outputs:

♠
♥
♦
♣

But, this is only for debug or test purpose: This relies on several undocumented current(Swift1.1) compiler behaviors. So, use it at your own risk :)

Here is the code:

func iterateEnum<T: Hashable>(_: T.Type) -> GeneratorOf<T> {
    var cast: (Int -> T)!
    switch sizeof(T) {
    case 0: return GeneratorOf(GeneratorOfOne(unsafeBitCast((), T.self)))
    case 1: cast = { unsafeBitCast(UInt8(truncatingBitPattern: $0), T.self) }
    case 2: cast = { unsafeBitCast(UInt16(truncatingBitPattern: $0), T.self) }
    case 4: cast = { unsafeBitCast(UInt32(truncatingBitPattern: $0), T.self) }
    case 8: cast = { unsafeBitCast(UInt64($0), T.self) }
    default: fatalError("cannot be here")
    }

    var i = 0
    return GeneratorOf {
        let next = cast(i)
        return next.hashValue == i++ ? next : nil
    }
}

The underlying idea is:

  • Memory representation of enum - excluding enums with associated types - is just a index of cases, when the count of the cases is 2...256, it's identical to UInt8, when 257...65536, it's UInt16 and so on. So, it can be unsafeBitcast from corresponding unsigned integer types.
  • .hashValue of enum values is the same as the index of the case.
  • .hashValue of enum values bitcasted from invalid index is 0

ADDED:

Revised for Swift2 and implemented casting ideas from @Kametrixom's answer

func iterateEnum<T: Hashable>(_: T.Type) -> AnyGenerator<T> {
    var i = 0
    return anyGenerator {
        let next = withUnsafePointer(&i) { UnsafePointer<T>($0).memory }
        return next.hashValue == i++ ? next : nil
    }
}

ADDED: Revised for Swift3

func iterateEnum<T: Hashable>(_: T.Type) -> AnyIterator<T> {
    var i = 0
    return AnyIterator {
        let next = withUnsafePointer(to: &i) {
            $0.withMemoryRebound(to: T.self, capacity: 1) { $0.pointee }
        }
        if next.hashValue != i { return nil }
        i += 1
        return next
    }
}

ADDED: Revised for Swift3.0.1

func iterateEnum<T: Hashable>(_: T.Type) -> AnyIterator<T> {
    var i = 0
    return AnyIterator {
        let next = withUnsafeBytes(of: &i) { $0.load(as: T.self) }
        if next.hashValue != i { return nil }
        i += 1
        return next
    }
}
  • 17
    Awesome and the only answer which answers the question! But Yeah...not gonna touch it! +1 for effort, though! – dotToString Mar 12 '15 at 2:40
  • I just posted my answer that works basically in the same way (only saw this answer later). It uses Swift 2.0 beta 6 and the modern features of the language. – Kametrixom Sep 6 '15 at 23:14
  • 2
    Swift 3 version works well. Just needed to modify usage a bit: for f in iterateEnum(Suit.self) { print(f.rawValue) } – Gene De Lisa Oct 22 '16 at 23:05
  • 15
    +1 this is quite brilliant. It's also, IMHO, too clever to use, as evidenced by it breaking significantly in every major Swift version change. To the author's credit, the Swift 3 version was done a month before Swift 3 came out of beta... If you're going to take this answer and learn all this withUnsafePointer withMemoryRebound and pointee stuff, then use this by all means. Otherwise, I'd avoid it. – Dan Rosenstark Dec 1 '16 at 1:40
  • 5
    I just want to add this is now broken in swift 4, but only on linux, so +1 to the above comments that this is too clever to use. – Andrew Plummer Oct 2 '17 at 1:46

The other solutions work but they all make assumptions of for example the number of possible ranks and suits, or what the first and last rank may be. True, the layout of a deck of cards probably isn't going to change much in the foreseeable future. In general, however, it's neater to write code which makes as little assumptions as possible. My solution:

I've added a raw type to the suit enum, so I can use Suit(rawValue:) to access the Suit cases:

enum Suit: Int {
    case Spades = 1
    case Hearts, Diamonds, Clubs
    func simpleDescription() -> String {
        switch self {
            case .Spades:
                return "spades"
            case .Hearts:
                return "hearts"
            case .Diamonds:
                return "diamonds"
            case .Clubs:
                return "clubs"
        }
    }
    func color() -> String {
        switch self {
        case .Spades:
            return "black"
        case .Clubs:
            return "black"
        case .Diamonds:
            return "red"
        case .Hearts:
            return "red"
        }
    }
}

enum Rank: Int {
    case Ace = 1
    case Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, Nine, Ten
    case Jack, Queen, King
    func simpleDescription() -> String {
        switch self {
            case .Ace:
                return "ace"
            case .Jack:
                return "jack"
            case .Queen:
                return "queen"
            case .King:
                return "king"
            default:
                return String(self.rawValue)
        }
    }
}

Below the implementation of Card's createDeck() method. init(rawValue:) is a failable initializer and returns an optional. By unwrapping and checking it's value in both while statements, there's no need to assume the number of Rank or Suit cases:

struct Card {
    var rank: Rank
    var suit: Suit
    func simpleDescription() -> String {
        return "The \(rank.simpleDescription()) of \(suit.simpleDescription())"
    }
    func createDeck() -> [Card] {
        var n = 1
        var deck = [Card]()
        while let rank = Rank(rawValue: n) {
            var m = 1
            while let suit = Suit(rawValue: m) {
                deck.append(Card(rank: rank, suit: suit))
                m += 1
            }
            n += 1
        }
        return deck
    }
}

Here is how to call the createDeck method:

let card = Card(rank: Rank.Ace, suit: Suit.Clubs)
let deck = card.createDeck()
  • 12
    Absolute BEST answer I've seen on various threads on this topic. Very elegant. This works with Int type enumerations, but I wonder how one might iterate through other types (string, custom types, etc.). – Jay Imerman Jun 17 '14 at 1:57
  • 2
    This is definitely the best solution. One thing to note. In the example in the book it does not have "case Spades = 1" as sdduursma has. I didn't catch this at first. that is one option, or you can just use "var m = 0" – Joshua Goossen Oct 19 '14 at 13:54
  • 10
    This makes the assumption that the raw values are sequential. When this is not true, for instance when the enum represents bit mask flags, the loop exits prematurely. – Jim Nov 29 '14 at 12:47
  • 1
    This solution assumes you can modify the definition of Suit. You can in this example, but the exercise was meant to get you to work with the enums you were given as if they were from an external source. – Josh J Sep 23 '15 at 20:59
  • 1
    The only thing I want to complain about is that I can't call it as a static method, but have to create a card object first. – qed Jan 11 '16 at 22:54

The second answer that really works

So I stumbled around in the bits and bytes and created an extension (that I later found out works very similar to @rintaro's answer). It's usable like this:

enum E : EnumCollection {
    case A, B, C
}

Array(E.cases())    // [A, B, C]

Remarkable is that it's usable on any enum (without associated values). Note that this doesn't work for enums that have no cases.

Disclaimer

As with @rintaro's answer, this code uses the underlying representation of an enum. This representation isn't documented and might change in the future, which would break it -> I don't recommend the usage of this in production.

Code (Swift 2.2, Xcode 7.3.1, not working on Xcode 10)

protocol EnumCollection : Hashable {}
extension EnumCollection {
    static func cases() -> AnySequence<Self> {
        typealias S = Self
        return AnySequence { () -> AnyGenerator<S> in
            var raw = 0
            return AnyGenerator {
                let current : Self = withUnsafePointer(&raw) { UnsafePointer($0).memory }
                guard current.hashValue == raw else { return nil }
                raw += 1
                return current
            }
        }
    }
}

Code (Swift 3, Xcode 8.1, not working on Xcode 10)

protocol EnumCollection : Hashable {}
extension EnumCollection {
    static func cases() -> AnySequence<Self> {
        typealias S = Self
        return AnySequence { () -> AnyIterator<S> in
            var raw = 0
            return AnyIterator {
                let current : Self = withUnsafePointer(to: &raw) { $0.withMemoryRebound(to: S.self, capacity: 1) { $0.pointee } }
                guard current.hashValue == raw else { return nil }
                raw += 1
                return current
            }
        }
    }
}

(I have no idea why I need the typealias, but the compiler complains without it)

(I made big modification to this answer, look at edits for past versions)

  • 9
    This answer is even better than my answer, especially in casting part :) – rintaro Sep 7 '15 at 1:23
  • But I think this works only on little endian environment? – rintaro Sep 7 '15 at 1:28
  • 5
    Xcode 8 beta 6 has changed this again! I get the following error ` 'init' is unavailable: use 'withMemoryRebound(to:capacity:_)' to temporarily view memory as another layout-compatible type.` – Confused Vorlon Aug 17 '16 at 11:06
  • 1
    @ConfusedVorlon: see answer above by @Rintaro: replace withUnsafePointerpointee} by withUnsafePointer(to: &i) { $0.withMemoryRebound(to: T.self, capacity: 1) { $0.pointee } } – Stefan Sep 6 '16 at 7:31
  • 1
    This seems to be no longer working as of Xcode 10. (I know this would not be required with Swift 4.2) but when using Swift 4(.1) in Xcode 10 this code is no longer working (raw value is unequal) – benrudhart Jul 16 at 18:50

You could iterate through an enum by implementing the ForwardIndexType protocol.

The ForwardIndexType protocol requires you to define a successor() function to step through the elements.

enum Rank: Int, ForwardIndexType {
    case Ace = 1
    case Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, Nine, Ten
    case Jack, Queen, King

    // ... other functions

    // Option 1 - Figure it out by hand
    func successor() -> Rank {
        switch self {
            case .Ace:
              return .Two
            case .Two:
              return .Three

            // ... etc.

            default:
              return .King
        }
    }

    // Option 2 - Define an operator!
    func successor() -> Rank {
        return self + 1
    }
}

// NOTE: The operator is defined OUTSIDE the class
func + (left: Rank, right: Int) -> Rank {
    // I'm using to/from raw here, but again, you can use a case statement
    // or whatever else you can think of

    return left == .King ? .King : Rank(rawValue: left.rawValue + right)!
}

Iterating over an open or closed range (..< or ...) will internally call the successor() function which allows you to write this:

// Under the covers, successor(Rank.King) and successor(Rank.Ace) are called to establish limits
for r in Rank.Ace...Rank.King {
    // Do something useful
}
  • 2
    I find this to be the most "proper" answer to the question, even the most "elegant" (extra code necessary vis-a-vis other options here withstanding) given the resulting syntax when used within a range (the syntax is what I would expect to be able to do if enums where enumeratable sans workarounds). Thanks! Although it is worth noting that if the operator overloading is employed elsewhere besides successor() (which seems tempting) then obviously the forced unwrapping is dangerous. Also, the infix seems unnecessary...? – iOS Gamer Aug 29 '14 at 23:26
  • Updated answer to reflect latest Swift language specifications – RndmTsk Sep 8 '14 at 17:02
  • A properly defined successor() method (first option) would eliminate the need for the enum to have an associated type. +1 – nhgrif Dec 2 '14 at 15:01
  • 1
    But this elegant answer won't work for String enums would it? – Ali Jan 12 '15 at 18:27
  • Most "proper" / best practice solution! +1-ed – Siu Ching Pong -Asuka Kenji- Apr 7 '15 at 3:21

In principle it is possible to do it this way assuming that you don't use raw values assignment for enum's cases:

enum RankEnum: Int {
  case Ace
  case One
  case Two
}

class RankEnumGenerator : Generator {
  var i = 0
  typealias Element = RankEnum
  func next() -> Element? {
    let r = RankEnum.fromRaw(i)
    i += 1
    return r
  }
}

extension RankEnum {
  static func enumerate() -> SequenceOf<RankEnum> {
    return SequenceOf<RankEnum>({ RankEnumGenerator() })
  }
}

for r in RankEnum.enumerate() {
  println("\(r.toRaw())")
}
  • 7
    This is nice but it only works for continuous Integer enums starting at 0 – Robert Jun 8 '14 at 21:16
  • @Robert, as my comment states above: "you don't use raw values assignment for enum's cases" – Alfa07 Jun 9 '14 at 18:37
  • Yes - don't use raw values, as well as setting the underlying type to be int. In swift you don't need a type for an enum like in the suits example. enum ItWontWorkForThisEnum {case a, b, c} – Robert Jun 9 '14 at 19:09
  • How would this address the issue if a tuple is associated with the enumeration case? – rougeExciter Jul 11 '14 at 11:25
  • You can't associate a tuple to an enum very easily. – nhgrif Dec 2 '14 at 15:00

Updated to Swift 2.2+

func iterateEnum<T: Hashable>(_: T.Type) -> AnyGenerator<T> {
    var i = 0
    return AnyGenerator {
        let next = withUnsafePointer(&i) {
            UnsafePointer<T>($0).memory
        }
        if next.hashValue == i {
            i += 1
            return next
        } else {
            return nil
        }
    }
}

it's updated code to Swift 2.2 form @Kametrixom's answer

For Swift 3.0+ (many thanks to @Philip)

func iterateEnum<T: Hashable>(_: T.Type) -> AnyIterator<T> {
    var i = 0
    return AnyIterator {
        let next = withUnsafePointer(&i) {
            UnsafePointer<T>($0).pointee
        }
        if next.hashValue == i {
            i += 1
            return next
        } else {
            return nil
        }
    }
}
  • @silvansky could you please explain what do you mean? – ale_stro Jun 14 '16 at 21:34
  • Oops, sorry, I rechecked and there was a playground bug: in real project this code works as expected, thanks! =) – silvansky Jun 16 '16 at 6:51
  • 1
    Great solution! Also, works fine on Swift 3 with minimal changes ('AnyGenerator' renamed 'AnyIterator' and '.memory' renamed to '.pointee'). – Philip Jun 17 '16 at 17:57

If you give the enum a raw Int value it will make looping much easier.

For example, you can use anyGenerator to get a generator that can enumerate across your values:

enum Suit: Int, CustomStringConvertible {
    case Spades, Hearts, Diamonds, Clubs
    var description: String {
        switch self {
        case .Spades:   return "Spades"
        case .Hearts:   return "Hearts"
        case .Diamonds: return "Diamonds"
        case .Clubs:    return "Clubs"
        }
    }
    static func enumerate() -> AnyGenerator<Suit> {
        var nextIndex = Spades.rawValue
        return anyGenerator { Suit(rawValue: nextIndex++) }
    }
}
// You can now use it like this:
for suit in Suit.enumerate() {
    suit.description
}
// or like this:
let allSuits: [Suit] = Array(Suit.enumerate())

However, this looks like a fairly common pattern, wouldn't it be nice if we could make any enum type enumerable by simply conforming to a protocol? Well with Swift 2.0 and protocol extensions, now we can!

Simply add this to your project:

protocol EnumerableEnum {
    init?(rawValue: Int)
    static func firstValue() -> Int
}
extension EnumerableEnum {
    static func enumerate() -> AnyGenerator<Self> {
        var nextIndex = firstRawValue()
        return anyGenerator { Self(rawValue: nextIndex++) }
    }
    static func firstRawValue() -> Int { return 0 }
}

Now any time you create an enum (so long as it has an Int raw value), you can make it enumerable by conforming to the protocol:

enum Rank: Int, EnumerableEnum {
    case Ace, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, Nine, Ten, Jack, Queen, King
}
// ...
for rank in Rank.enumerate() { ... }

If your enum values don't start with 0 (the default), override the firstRawValue method:

enum DeckColor: Int, EnumerableEnum {
    case Red = 10, Blue, Black
    static func firstRawValue() -> Int { return Red.rawValue }
}
// ...
let colors = Array(DeckColor.enumerate())

The final Suit class, including replacing simpleDescription with the more standard CustomStringConvertible protocol, will look like this:

enum Suit: Int, CustomStringConvertible, EnumerableEnum {
    case Spades, Hearts, Diamonds, Clubs
    var description: String {
        switch self {
        case .Spades:   return "Spades"
        case .Hearts:   return "Hearts"
        case .Diamonds: return "Diamonds"
        case .Clubs:    return "Clubs"
        }
    }
}
// ...
for suit in Suit.enumerate() {
    print(suit.description)
}

EDIT:

Swift 3 syntax:

protocol EnumerableEnum {
    init?(rawValue: Int)
    static func firstRawValue() -> Int
}

extension EnumerableEnum {
    static func enumerate() -> AnyIterator<Self> {
        var nextIndex = firstRawValue()

        let iterator: AnyIterator<Self> = AnyIterator {
            defer { nextIndex = nextIndex + 1 }
            return Self(rawValue: nextIndex)
        }

        return iterator
    }

    static func firstRawValue() -> Int {
        return 0
    }
}
  • nextIndex++ will be removed in swift 3. What do you suggest as replacement to - var nextIndex = firstRawValue() return anyGenerator { Self(rawValue: nextIndex++) } – Avi Sep 19 '16 at 20:03
  • Figured it out. defer { nextIndex += 1 } return AnyGenerator { Self(rawValue: nextIndex) } – Avi Sep 19 '16 at 20:10

I like this solution which I put together after finding this page: List comprehension in Swift

It uses Int raws instead of Strings but it avoids typing twice, it allows customizing the ranges, and doesn't hard code raw values.

enum Suit: Int {
    case None
    case Spade, Heart, Diamond, Club

    static let allRawValues = Suit.Spade.rawValue...Suit.Club.rawValue
    static let allCases = Array(allRawValues.map{ Suit(rawValue: $0)! })
}

enum Rank: Int {
    case Joker
    case Two, Three, Four, Five, Six
    case Seven, Eight, Nine, Ten
    case Jack, Queen, King, Ace

    static let allRawValues = Rank.Two.rawValue...Rank.Ace.rawValue
    static let allCases = Array(allRawValues.map{ Rank(rawValue: $0)! })
}

func makeDeck(withJoker withJoker: Bool) -> [Card] {
    var deck = [Card]()
    for suit in Suit.allCases {
        for rank in Rank.allCases {
            deck.append(Card(suit: suit, rank: rank))
        }
    }
    if withJoker {
        deck.append(Card(suit: .None, rank: .Joker))
    }
    return deck
}
  • Oh, I see now that mine is basically the same as Sutean Rutjanalard's. – adazacom Dec 6 '15 at 12:16
  • Actually, I liked your implementation better. I think it is clearer! 1 upvote. Actually the most voted answers are too clever and will most certainly break in the future. Yours promises some stability in the future. – jvarela Dec 22 '16 at 0:17
  • Awesome solution! – Fraser Jun 14 '17 at 23:07

I found myself doing .allValues alot throughout my code. I finally figured out a way to simply conform to an Iteratable protocol and have an rawValues() method.

protocol Iteratable {}
extension RawRepresentable where Self: RawRepresentable {

    static func iterateEnum<T: Hashable>(_: T.Type) -> AnyIterator<T> {
        var i = 0
        return AnyIterator {
            let next = withUnsafePointer(to: &i) {
                $0.withMemoryRebound(to: T.self, capacity: 1) { $0.pointee }
            }
            if next.hashValue != i { return nil }
            i += 1
            return next
        }
    }
}

extension Iteratable where Self: RawRepresentable, Self: Hashable {
    static func hashValues() -> AnyIterator<Self> {
        return iterateEnum(self)
    }

    static func rawValues() -> [Self.RawValue] {
        return hashValues().map({$0.rawValue})
    }
}


// Example
enum Grocery: String, Iteratable {
    case Kroger = "kroger"
    case HEB = "h.e.b."
    case Randalls = "randalls"
}

let groceryHashes = Grocery.hashValues() // AnyIterator<Grocery>
let groceryRawValues = Grocery.rawValues() // ["kroger", "h.e.b.", "randalls"]
enum Rank: Int {
    ...
    static let ranks = (Rank.Ace.rawValue ... Rank.King.rawValue).map{Rank(rawValue: $0)! }

}
enum Suit {
    ...
    static let suits = [Spades, Hearts, Diamonds, Clubs]
}

struct Card {
    ...
    static func fullDesk() -> [Card] {
        var desk: [Card] = []
        for suit in Suit.suits {
            for rank in Rank.ranks {
                desk.append(Card(rank: rank,suit: suit))
            }
        }
        return desk
    }
}

How about this?

EDIT: Swift Evolution Proposal SE-0194 Derived Collection of Enum Cases proposes a level headed solution to this problem. We see it in Swift 4.2 and newer. The proposal also points out to some workarounds that are similar to some already mentioned here but it might be interesting to see nevertheless.

I will also keep my original post for completeness sake.


This is yet another approach based on @Peymmankh's answer, adapted to Swift 3.

public protocol EnumCollection : Hashable {}

extension EnumCollection {

public static func allValues() -> [Self] {
    typealias S = Self

    let retVal = AnySequence { () -> AnyIterator<S> in
        var raw = 0
        return AnyIterator {
            let current = withUnsafePointer(to: &raw) {
                 $0.withMemoryRebound(to: S.self, capacity: 1) { $0.pointee }
            }
            guard current.hashValue == raw else { return nil }
            raw += 1
            return current
        }
    }

    return [S](retVal)
  }
}

Sorry, my answer was specific to how I used this post in what I needed to do. For those who stumble upon this question, looking for a way to find a case within an enum, this is the way to do it (new in Swift 2):

Edit: lowercase camelCase is now the standard for Swift 3 enum values

// From apple docs: If the raw-value type is specified as String and you don’t assign values to the cases explicitly, each unassigned case is implicitly assigned a string with the same text as the name of that case.

enum Theme: String
    {
    case white, blue, green, lavender, grey
    }

func loadTheme(theme: String)
    {
    // this checks the string against the raw value of each enum case (note that the check could result in a nil value, since it's an optional, which is why we introduce the if/let block
    if let testTheme = Theme(rawValue: theme)
        {
        // testTheme is guaranteed to have an enum value at this point
        self.someOtherFunction(testTheme)
        }
    }

For those wondering about the enumerating on an enum, the answers given on this page that include a static var/let containing an array of all enum values are correct. The latest Apple example code for tvOS contains this exact same technique.

That being said, they should build a more convenient mechanism into the language (Apple, are you listening?)!

In Swift 3, when the underlying enum has {rawValue}s, you could implement the {Strideable} protocol. The advantages are that no arrays of values are created like in some other suggestions, and that the standard Swift "for i in ..." statement works, which makes for nice syntax.

// "Int" to get rawValue, and {Strideable} so we can iterate
enum MyColorEnum : Int, Strideable {
    case Red
    case Green
    case Blue
    case Black

    //-------- required by {Strideable}
    typealias Stride = Int

    func advanced(by n:Stride) -> MyColorEnum {
        var next = self.rawValue + n
        if next > MyColorEnum.Black.rawValue {
            next = MyColorEnum.Black.rawValue
        }
        return MyColorEnum(rawValue: next)!
    }

    func distance(to other: MyColorEnum) -> Int {
        return other.rawValue - self.rawValue
    }

    //-------- just for printing
    func simpleDescription() -> String {
        switch self {
        case .Red: return "Red"
        case .Green: return "Green"
        case .Blue: return "Blue"
        case .Black: return "Black"
        }
    }
}

// this is how you use it:
for i in MyColorEnum.Red ... MyColorEnum.Black {
    print("ENUM: \(i)")
}
  • Ahh, just what I was looking for to replace ForwardIndexType. Now my iterations look good at the usage site... just the proper Swifty way. – Andrew Duncan Dec 26 '16 at 7:13

You can try to enumerate like this

enum Planet: String {
  case Mercury
  case Venus
  case Earth
  case Mars

static var enumerate: [Planet] {
    var a: [Planet] = []
    switch Planet.Mercury {
    case .Mercury: a.append(.Mercury); fallthrough
    case .Venus: a.append(.Venus); fallthrough
    case .Earth: a.append(.Earth); fallthrough
    case .Mars: a.append(.Mars)
    }
    return a
  }
}

Planet.enumerate // [Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars]
  • 1
    That's a lot of useless code! It's equivalent to static var enumerate = [Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars], making it a subpar answer compared to most voted answer stackoverflow.com/a/24137319/1033581 – Cœur Apr 1 at 16:20
  • @Cœur this answer has the important benefit of using the compiler to guarantee you won't miss a case. – dchakarov May 17 at 15:37
  • @Cœur that has the same problem of allowing you to make a user error, i.e. the compiler won't complain if you write return [Mercury, Venus, Mars] instead of return [Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars] – dchakarov May 18 at 10:10
  • @dchakarov I decided to post the improvement as an answer, for clarity: stackoverflow.com/a/50409525/1033581 – Cœur May 18 at 10:41
  • @Cœur If in your new answer you replace the return statement with this return [.spades, .hearts, .clubs] the compiler won't say a thing and then when you try to use it in code, you will get [TestApp.Suit.spades, TestApp.Suit.hearts, TestApp.Suit.clubs] - that was my point - that if you are dealing with a big enum and you have to add or remove cases from time to time, your solution is prone to errors of omission while the current answer, while not concise, is safer. – dchakarov May 18 at 15:56

This is what I ended up going with; I think it strikes the right balance of readability and maintainability.

struct Card {

// ...

static func deck() -> Card[] {
    var deck = Card[]()
    for rank in Rank.Ace.toRaw()...Rank.King.toRaw() {
        for suit in [Suit.Spades, .Hearts, .Clubs, .Diamonds] {
            let card = Card(rank: Rank.fromRaw(rank)!, suit: suit)
            deck.append(card)
        }
    }
    return deck
}

let deck = Card.deck()
  • In my opinion, this is the best solution. When I see swift code, mostly, readability is not better than objc. But it could be, if programmers payed greater attention to readers of their code. Their future selves, for example :) – Vilém Kurz Jan 11 '16 at 15:38

The experiment was: EXPERIMENT

Add a method to Card that creates a full deck of cards, with one card of each combination of rank and suit.

So without modifying or enhancing the given code other than adding the method (and without using stuff that hasn't been taught yet), I came up with this solution:

struct Card {
    var rank: Rank
    var suit: Suit

    func simpleDescription() -> String {
        return "The \(rank.simpleDescription()) of \(suit.simpleDescription())"
    }

    func createDeck() -> [Card] {
        var deck: [Card] = []
        for rank in Rank.Ace.rawValue...Rank.King.rawValue {
            for suit in Suit.Spades.rawValue...Suit.Clubs.rawValue {
                let card = Card(rank: Rank(rawValue: rank)!, suit: Suit(rawValue: suit)!)
                //println(card.simpleDescription())
                deck += [card]
            }
        }
        return deck
    }
}
let threeOfSpades = Card(rank: .Three, suit: .Spades)
let threeOfSpadesDescription = threeOfSpades.simpleDescription()
let deck = threeOfSpades.createDeck()

As with @Kametrixom answer here I believe returning an array would be better than returning AnySequence, since you can have access to all of Array's goodies such as count, etc.

Here's the re-write:

public protocol EnumCollection : Hashable {}
extension EnumCollection {
    public static func allValues() -> [Self] {
        typealias S = Self
        let retVal = AnySequence { () -> AnyGenerator<S> in
            var raw = 0
            return AnyGenerator {
                let current : Self = withUnsafePointer(&raw) { UnsafePointer($0).memory }
                guard current.hashValue == raw else { return nil }
                raw += 1
                return current
            }
        }

        return [S](retVal)
    }
}
  • This is a proper solution. – ff10 Aug 27 '16 at 17:00

Enums have toRaw() and fromRaw() methods so if your raw value is an Int, you can iterate from the first to last enum:

enum Suit: Int {
    case Spades = 1
    case Hearts, Diamonds, Clubs
    func simpleDescription() -> String {
        switch self {
        case .Spades:
            return "spades"
        case .Hearts:
            return "hearts"
        case .Diamonds:
            return "diamonds"
        case .Clubs:
            return "clubs"
        }
    }
}

for i in Suit.Spades.toRaw()...Suit.Clubs.toRaw() {
    if let covertedSuit = Suit.fromRaw(i) {
        let description = covertedSuit.simpleDescription()
    }
}

One gotcha is that you need to test for optional values before running the simpleDescription method, so we set convertedSuit to our value first and then set a constant to convertedSuit.simpleDescription()

  • 2
    The original question was about a String type enum not Int – cynistersix Nov 11 '14 at 23:48

This seems like a hack but if you use raw values you can do something like this

enum Suit: Int {  
    case Spades = 0, Hearts, Diamonds, Clubs  
 ...  
}  

var suitIndex = 0  
while var suit = Suit.fromRaw(suitIndex++) {  
   ...  
}  

Here's my suggested approach. It's not completely satisfactory (I'm very new to Swift and OOP!) but maybe someone can refine it. The idea is to have each enum provide its own range information as .first and .last properties. It adds just two lines of code to each enum: still a bit hard-coded, but at least it's not duplicating the whole set. It does require modifying the Suit enum to be an Int like the Rank enum is, instead of untyped.

Rather than echo the whole solution, here's the code I added to the Rank enum, somewhere after the case statements (Suit enum is similar):

var first: Int { return Ace.toRaw() }
var last: Int { return King.toRaw() }

and the loop I used to build the deck as an array of String. (The problem definition did not state how the deck was to be structured.)

func createDeck() -> [String] {
var deck: [String] = []
var card: String
for r in Rank.Ace.first...Rank.Ace.last {
    for s in Suit.Hearts.first...Suit.Hearts.last {
       card = Rank.simpleDescription( Rank.fromRaw(r)!)() + " of " + Suit.simpleDescription( Suit.fromRaw(s)!)()
       deck.append( card)
       }
   }
return deck
}

It's unsatisfactory because the properties are associated to an element rather than to the enum. But it does add clarity to the 'for' loops. I'd like it to say Rank.first instead of Rank.Ace.first. It works (with any element), but it's ugly. Can someone show how to elevate that to the enum level?

And to make it work, I lifted the createDeck method out of the Card struct... could not figure out how to get a [String] array returned from that struct, and that seems a bad place to put such a method anyway.

I did it using computed property, which returns the array of all values (thanks to this post http://natecook.com/blog/2014/10/loopy-random-enum-ideas/). However it also uses int raw-values, but I don't need to repeat all members of enumeration in separate property.

UPDATE Xcode 6.1 changed a bit a way how to get enum member using raw value, so I fixed listing. Also fixed small error with wrong first raw value

enum ValidSuits:Int{
    case Clubs=0, Spades, Hearts, Diamonds
    func description()->String{
        switch self{
        case .Clubs:
            return "♣︎"
        case .Spades:
            return "♠︎"
        case .Diamonds:
            return "♦︎"
        case .Hearts:
            return "♥︎"
        }
    }

    static var allSuits:[ValidSuits]{
        return Array(
            SequenceOf {
                () -> GeneratorOf<ValidSuits> in
                var i=0
                return GeneratorOf<ValidSuits>{
                    return ValidSuits(rawValue: i++)
                }
            }
        )
    }
}

While dealing with Swift 2.0 here is my suggestion:

I have added the raw type to Suit enum

enum Suit: Int {

then:

struct Card {
    var rank: Rank
    var suit: Suit


    func fullDeck()-> [Card] {

        var deck = [Card]()

        for i in Rank.Ace.rawValue...Rank.King.rawValue {

            for j in Suit.Spades.rawValue...Suit.Clubs.rawValue {

                deck.append(Card(rank:Rank(rawValue: i)! , suit: Suit(rawValue: j)!))
            }
        }

        return deck
    }
}

For enum representing Int

enum Filter: Int {
    case salary
    case experience
    case technology
    case unutilized
    case unutilizedHV

    static let allRawValues = salary.rawValue...unutilizedHV.rawValue  // First to last case
    static let allValues = allRawValues.map { Filter(rawValue: $0)!.rawValue }
}

Call it like this:

print(Filter.allValues)

Prints:

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4]


For enum representing String

enum Filter: Int {
    case salary
    case experience
    case technology
    case unutilized
    case unutilizedHV

    static let allRawValues = salary.rawValue...unutilizedHV.rawValue  // First to last case
    static let allValues = allRawValues.map { Filter(rawValue: $0)!.description }
}

extension Filter: CustomStringConvertible {
    var description: String {
        switch self {
        case .salary: return "Salary"
        case .experience: return "Experience"
        case .technology: return "Technology"
        case .unutilized: return "Unutilized"
        case .unutilizedHV: return "Unutilized High Value"
        }
    }
}

Call it

print(Filter.allValues)

Prints:

["Salary", "Experience", "Technology", "Unutilized", "Unutilized High Value"]

Another solution:

enum Suit: String {
    case spades = "♠"
    case hearts = "♥"
    case diamonds = "♦"
    case clubs = "♣"

    static var count: Int {
        return 4   
    }

    init(index: Int) {
        switch index {
            case 0: self = .spades
            case 1: self = .hearts
            case 2: self = .diamonds
            default: self = .clubs
        }
    }
}

for i in 0..<Suit.count {
    print(Suit(index: i).rawValue)
}

This is a pretty old post, from Swift 2.0. There are now some better solutions here that use newer features of swift 3.0: Iterating through an Enum in Swift 3.0

And on this question there is a solution that uses a new feature of (the not-yet-released as I write this edit) Swift 4.2: How do I get the count of a Swift enum?


There are lots of good solutions in this thread and others however some of them are very complicated. I like to simplify as much as possible. Here is a solution which may or may not work for different needs but I think it works well in most cases:

enum Number: String {
    case One
    case Two
    case Three
    case Four
    case EndIndex

    func nextCase () -> Number
    {
        switch self {
        case .One:
            return .Two
        case .Two:
            return .Three
        case .Three:
            return .Four
        case .Four:
            return .EndIndex

        /* 
        Add all additional cases above
        */
        case .EndIndex:
            return .EndIndex
        }
    }

    static var allValues: [String] {
        var array: [String] = Array()
        var number = Number.One

        while number != Number.EndIndex {
            array.append(number.rawValue)
            number = number.nextCase()
        }
        return array
    }
}

To iterate:

for item in Number.allValues {
    print("number is: \(item)")
}
  • 1
    That feels like a lot of work that's specific to the individual enum you've created - I'm not sure that return [Number.One.rawValue, Number.Two.rawValue, ...] isn't cleaner, in this case. – Scott Austin Aug 22 '17 at 3:30
  • This is a pretty old post, from Swift 2.0. There are now some better solutions here that use newer features of swift 3.0: stackoverflow.com/questions/41352594/… And on this question there is a solution that uses a new feature of (the not-yet-released as I write this edit) Swift 4.2: stackoverflow.com/questions/27094878/… – Abbey Jackson May 30 at 15:40

Here a method I use to both iterate an enum, and provide multiple values types from one enum

enum IterateEnum: Int {
    case Zero
    case One
    case Two
    case Three
    case Four
    case Five
    case Six
    case Seven

    //tuple allows multiple values to be derived from the enum case, and
    //since it is using a switch with no default, if a new case is added,
    //a compiler error will be returned if it doesn't have a value tuple set
    var value: (french:String, spanish:String, japanese:String) {
        switch self {
        case .Zero: return (french:"zéro", spanish:"cero", japanese:"nuru")
        case .One: return (french:"un", spanish:"uno", japanese:"ichi")
        case .Two: return (french:"deux", spanish:"dos", japanese:"ni")
        case .Three: return (french:"trois", spanish:"tres", japanese:"san")
        case .Four: return (french:"quatre", spanish:"cuatro", japanese:"shi")
        case .Five: return (french:"cinq", spanish:"cinco", japanese:"go")
        case .Six: return (french:"six", spanish:"seis", japanese:"roku")
        case .Seven: return (french:"sept", spanish:"siete", japanese:"shichi")
        }
    }

    //Used to iterate enum or otherwise access enum case by index order.
    //Iterate by looping until it returns nil
    static func item(index:Int) -> IterateEnum? {
        return IterateEnum.init(rawValue: index)
    }

    static func numberFromSpanish(number:String) -> IterateEnum? {
        return findItem { $0.value.spanish == number }
    }

    //use block to test value property to retrieve the enum case        
    static func findItem(predicate:((_:IterateEnum)->Bool)) -> IterateEnum? {

        var enumIndex:Int = -1
        var enumCase:IterateEnum?

        //Iterate until item returns nil
        repeat {
            enumIndex += 1
            enumCase = IterateEnum.item(index: enumIndex)

            if let eCase = enumCase {

                if predicate(eCase) {
                    return eCase
                }
            }
        } while enumCase != nil
        return nil
    }
}

var enumIndex:Int = -1
var enumCase:IterateEnum?

//Iterate until item returns nil
repeat {
    enumIndex += 1
    enumCase = IterateEnum.item(index: enumIndex)
    if let eCase = enumCase {
        print("The number \(eCase) in french: \(eCase.value.french), spanish: \(eCase.value.spanish), japanese: \(eCase.value.japanese)")
    }
} while enumCase != nil

print("Total of \(enumIndex) cases")

let number = IterateEnum.numberFromSpanish(number: "siete")

print("siete in japanese: \((number?.value.japanese ?? "Unknown"))")

This is the output:

The number Zero in french: zéro, spanish: cero, japanese: nuru
The number One in french: un, spanish: uno, japanese: ichi
The number Two in french: deux, spanish: dos, japanese: ni
The number Three in french: trois, spanish: tres, japanese: san
The number Four in french: quatre, spanish: cuatro, japanese: shi
The number Five in french: cinq, spanish: cinco, japanese: go
The number Six in french: six, spanish: seis, japanese: roku
The number Seven in french: sept, spanish: siete, japanese: shichi

Total of 8 cases

siete in japanese: shichi


UPDATE

I recently created a protocol to handle the enumeration. The protocol requires an enum with an Int raw value:

protocol EnumIteration {

    //Used to iterate enum or otherwise access enum case by index order. Iterate by looping until it returns nil

    static func item(index:Int) -> Self?
    static func iterate(item:((index:Int, enumCase:Self)->()), completion:(()->())?) {
    static func findItem(predicate:((enumCase:Self)->Bool)) -> Self?
    static func count() -> Int
}

extension EnumIteration where Self: RawRepresentable, Self.RawValue == Int {

    //Used to iterate enum or otherwise access enum case by index order. Iterate by looping until it returns nil
    static func item(index:Int) -> Self? {
        return Self.init(rawValue: index)
    }

    static func iterate(item:((index:Int, enumCase:Self)->()), completion:(()->())?) {

        var enumIndex:Int = -1
        var enumCase:Self?

        //Iterate until item returns nil
        repeat {
            enumIndex += 1
            enumCase = Self.item(enumIndex)

            if let eCase = enumCase {
                item(index: enumIndex, enumCase: eCase)
            }
        } while enumCase != nil
        completion?()
    }

    static func findItem(predicate:((enumCase:Self)->Bool)) -> Self? {

        var enumIndex:Int = -1
        var enumCase:Self?

        //Iterate until item returns nil
        repeat {
            enumIndex += 1
            enumCase = Self.item(enumIndex)

            if let eCase = enumCase {

                if predicate(enumCase:eCase) {
                    return eCase
                }
            }
        } while enumCase != nil
        return nil
    }

    static func count() -> Int {
        var enumIndex:Int = -1
        var enumCase:Self?

        //Iterate until item returns nil
        repeat {
            enumIndex += 1
            enumCase = Self.item(enumIndex)
        } while enumCase != nil

        //last enumIndex (when enumCase == nil) is equal to the enum count
        return enumIndex
    }
}

I have used the below method, the assumption is that I know which is the last value in the Rank enum and all the ranks have incremental values after Ace

I prefer this way as it is clean and small, easy to understand

 func cardDeck() -> Card[] {
    var cards: Card[] = []
    let minRank = Rank.Ace.toRaw()
    let maxRank = Rank.King.toRaw()

    for rank in minRank...maxRank {
        if var convertedRank: Rank = Rank.fromRaw(rank) {
            cards.append(Card(rank: convertedRank, suite: Suite.Clubs))
            cards.append(Card(rank: convertedRank, suite: Suite.Diamonds))
            cards.append(Card(rank: convertedRank, suite: Suite.Hearts))
            cards.append(Card(rank: convertedRank, suite: Suite.Spades))
        }
    }

    return cards
}

There is a clever way, and frustrating as it is it illustrates the difference between the two different kinds of enums.

Try this:

    func makeDeck() -> Card[] {
      var deck: Card[] = []
      var suits: Suit[] = [.Hearts, .Diamonds, .Clubs, .Spades]
      for i in 1...13 {
        for suit in suits {
          deck += Card(rank: Rank.fromRaw(i)!, suit: suit)
        }
      }
      return deck
    }

The deal is that an enum backed by numbers (raw values) is implicitly explicitly ordered, whereas an enum that isn't backed by numbers is explicitly implicitly unordered.

E.g. when we give the enum values numbers, the language is cunning enough to figure out what order the numbers are in. If on the other hand we don't give it any ordering, when we try to iterate over the values the language throws its hands up in the air and goes "yes, but which one do you want to go first???"

Other languages which can do this (iterating over unordered enums) might be the same languages where everything is 'under the hood' actually a map or dictionary, and you can iterate over the keys of a map, whether there's any logical ordering or not.

So the trick is to provide it with something that is explicitly ordered, in this case instances of the suits in an array in the order we want. As soon as you give it that, Swift is like "well why didn't you say so in the first place?"

The other shorthand trick is to use the forcing operator on the fromRaw function. This illustrates another 'gotcha' about enums, that the range of possible values to pass in is often larger than the range of enums. For instance if we said Rank.fromRaw(60) there wouldn't be a value returned, so we're using the optional feature of the language, and where we start using optionals, forcing will soon follow. (Or alternately the if let construction which still seems a bit weird to me)

  • See also John and Andrew's replies. – Rick Jun 9 '14 at 1:46
  • 1
    "The deal is that an enum backed by numbers (raw values) is implicitly explicitly ordered, whereas an enum that isn't backed by numbers is explicitly implicitly unordered." -- I disagree. The "natural" order of every enum (regardless of if it's backed by ints) should be the order the enum elements are declared. Usually that would coincide with the order of raw values for integer backed enums anyway, but it should not be required. – Alvin Thompson Jun 13 '14 at 6:35
  • I'm sure you can think of cases for enums to be backed by ints, but not ordered by the raw value. For example, an enum of positions on a rugby team. The int value could be the jersey number, but you probably wouldn't want to order the positions by their jersey number. For those who aren't familiar with rugby, the jersey number for a given position is (traditionally) constant. For example, the jersey number of the hooker is "2" and the jersey number of the left wing is "11". – Alvin Thompson Jun 13 '14 at 6:44

protected by eyllanesc Jun 19 at 5:17

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