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I am studying programs about Producer-Consumer problem(from my OS class), when I compile it, I encounter this oroblem:

razrlele@razrlele-ThinkPad:~/work/os$ gcc producerconsumer.c -lpthread -o producerconsumer
/tmp/ccyFGuJk.o: In function `main':
producerconsumer.c:(.text+0xb8): undefined reference to `err_quit'
producerconsumer.c:(.text+0xfc): undefined reference to `err_quit'
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status

I am wondering where err_quit is defined?

My operating system is Ubuntu-gnome 14.04 and here is my whole program code:

  1 #include <stdio.h>
  2 #include <sys/types.h>
  3 #include <semaphore.h>
  4 #include <pthread.h>
  5 #include <stdlib.h>
  6 
  7 void *producer_handler(void *ptr);
  8 void *consumer_handler(void *ptr);
  9 
 10 sem_t mutex, blank, fill;
 11 int *buffer;
 12 int in = 0, out = 0, buffer_size = 10;
 13 
 14 int main()
 15 {
 16         if((buffer = (int *)malloc(buffer_size *sizeof(int))) == NULL)
 17                 printf("can't allocate memory on heap\n");
 18         sem_init(&mutex, 0, 1);
 19         sem_init(&blank, 0, buffer_size);
 20         sem_init(&fill, 0, 0);
 21 
 22         int err;
 23         pthread_t producer, consumer;
 24         err = pthread_create(&producer, NULL, producer_handler, NULL);
 25         if(err != 0)
 26                 err_quit("can't create thread: %s\n", strerror(err));
 27                 err = pthread_create(&consumer, NULL, consumer_handler, NULL);
 28                 if(err != 0)
 29                         err_quit("can't create thread: %s\n", strerror(err));
 30 
 31         sleep(10);
 32         return 0;
 33 }
 34 
 35 void *producer_handler(void *ptr)
 36 {
 37         while(1)
 38         {
 39                 static int data = 0;
 40                 sem_wait(&blank);
 41                 sem_wait(&mutex);
 42 
 43                 buffer[in] = ++data;
 44                 printf("%d has been input to the buffer\n", data);
 45                 in = (in + 1 + buffer_size)%buffer_size;
 46                 sem_post(&mutex);
 47                 sem_post(&fill);
 48                 sleep(1);
 49         }
 50         return ((void *) 0);
 51 }
 52 
 53 void *consumer_handler(void *ptr)
 54 {
 55         while(1)
 56         {
 57                 int fetch;
 58                 sem_wait(&fill);
 59                 sem_wait(&mutex);
 60                 fetch = buffer[out];
 61                 out = (out + 1 + buffer_size)%buffer_size;
 62                 printf("%d has been fetched\n", fetch);
 63                 sem_post(&mutex);
 64                 sem_post(&blank);
 65                 sleep(2);
 66         }
 67         return ((void *) 0);
 68 }
 69 
4
  • What makes you think err_quit is defined anywhere? If you don't know where it is defined, why are you calling it? It looks like you just copied some example without understanding it.
    – Jim Balter
    Commented Jun 3, 2014 at 9:10
  • 1
    @JimBalter I am not the original author of these codes, and I copied it because I am trying to understand it.
    – razrLeLe
    Commented Jun 3, 2014 at 9:27
  • "I am writing programs" says something different. Anyway, you have your answer from unwind and should accept it.
    – Jim Balter
    Commented Jun 3, 2014 at 9:33
  • @JimBalter Sorry about my not being clear, and I have corrected it. ;-)
    – razrLeLe
    Commented Jun 3, 2014 at 9:38

3 Answers 3

8

Late for the party, but maybe someone would find it useful.

err_quit isn't a standard C function. Most probably, your OS teacher used the code from Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment. Here is the source code for the third edition. err_quit is defined in include/apue.h, the implementation is in lib/error.c.

2

err_quit() isn't a standard system function but a simple error routine that prints on the console. For more info you can look through the Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment book Appendix B section.

1

There is no standard function called err_quit(). Why did you decide to use it?

It doesn't look like it does very much, so one idea for an implementation might be:

void err_quit(const char *fmt, ...)
{
  va_list args;

  va_start(args, fmt);
  vfprintf(stderr, fmt, args);
  va_end(args);
  exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

This just based on guesses from the name and usage pattern of the function, of course.

2
  • The next question from the OP will be why the compiler is complaining that err_quit was defined with the wrong type. :-)
    – Jim Balter
    Commented Jun 3, 2014 at 9:13
  • I found it just now that err_quit() is actually used as printf() and when I add #include <string.h> and replace err_quit() with printf() , it is compiled successfully.
    – razrLeLe
    Commented Jun 3, 2014 at 10:05

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