213

Swift has:

  • Strong References
  • Weak References
  • Unowned References

How is an unowned reference different from a weak reference?

When is it safe to use an unowned reference?

Are unowned references a security risk like dangling pointers in C/C++?

  • 2
    Very good article on andrewcbancroft.com/2015/05/08/… – Zeeshan May 10 '15 at 11:58
  • My experience is to use unowned for the classes we control, for Apple classes, use weak because we can't guarantee for sure what it does – onmyway133 Oct 20 '15 at 9:33
  • @NoorAli, or "ownedBy" as the "unowned" reference often points to the owner. – Ian Ringrose Sep 25 '16 at 17:00
316

Both weak and unowned references do not create a strong hold on the referred object (a.k.a. they don't increase the retain count in order to prevent ARC from deallocating the referred object).

But why two keywords? This distinction has to do with the fact that Optional types are built-in the Swift language. Long story short about them: optional types offer memory safety (this works beautifully with Swift's constructor rules - which are strict in order to provide this benefit).

A weak reference allows the posibility of it to become nil (this happens automatically when the referenced object is deallocated), therefore the type of your property must be optional - so you, as a programmer, are obligated to check it before you use it (basically the compiler forces you, as much as it can, to write safe code).

An unowned reference presumes that it will never become nil during it's lifetime. A unowned reference must be set during initialization - this means that the reference will be defined as a non-optional type that can be used safely without checks. If somehow the object being referred is deallocated, then the app will crash when the unowned reference will be used.

From the Apple docs:

Use a weak reference whenever it is valid for that reference to become nil at some point during its lifetime. Conversely, use an unowned reference when you know that the reference will never be nil once it has been set during initialization.

In the docs there are some examples that discusses retain cycles and how to break them. All these examples are extracted from the docs.

Example for the weak keyword:

class Person {
    let name: String
    init(name: String) { self.name = name }
    var apartment: Apartment?
}

class Apartment {
    let number: Int
    init(number: Int) { self.number = number }
    weak var tenant: Person?
}

And now, for some ASCII art (you should go see the docs - they have pretty diagrams):

Person ===(strong)==> Apartment
Person <==(weak)===== Apartment

The Person and Apartment example shows a situation where two properties, both of which are allowed to be nil, have the potential to cause a strong reference cycle. This scenario is best resolved with a weak reference. Both entities can exist without having a strict dependency upon the other.

Example for the unowned keyword:

class Customer {
    let name: String
    var card: CreditCard?
    init(name: String) { self.name = name }
}

class CreditCard {
    let number: UInt64
    unowned let customer: Customer
    init(number: UInt64, customer: Customer) { self.number = number; self.customer = customer }
}

In this example, a Customer may or may not have a CreditCard, but a CreditCard will always be associated with a Customer. To represent this, the Customer class has an optional card property, but the CreditCard class has a non-optional (and unowned) customer property.

Customer ===(strong)==> CreditCard
Customer <==(unowned)== CreditCard

The Customer and CreditCard example shows a situation where one property that is allowed to be nil and another property that cannot be nil have the potential to cause a strong reference cycle. This scenario is best resolved with an unowned reference.

Note from Apple:

Weak references must be declared as variables, to indicate that their value can change at runtime. A weak reference cannot be declared as a constant.

There is also a third scenario when both properties should always have a value, and neither property should ever be nil once initialization is complete.

And there are also the classic retain cycle scenarios to avoid when working with closures.

For this, I encourage you to visit the Apple docs, or read the book.

  • 2
    This is somewhat trivial but I find the example of the Apartment and Person somewhat confusing which also presents an additional solution to break the strong reference cycle. A person's apartment is optional and therefore can be nil as well as an Apartment's tenant is optional and therefore can be nil so both properties can be defined as weak. ``` – Justin Levi Winter Nov 22 '14 at 18:40
  • class Person { let name: String init(name: String) { self.name = name } weak var apartment: Apartment? } class Apartment { let number: Int init(number: Int) { self.number = number } weak var tenant: Person? } – Justin Levi Winter Nov 22 '14 at 18:57
  • 3
    What's the difference between weak var Person? vs. var Person? ? – Dean Nov 30 '14 at 4:32
  • 4
    @JustinLevi, If you declare both properties as weak, there is a possibility for them to be deallocated. The Person keeps a strong reference to the Apartment so the Apartment will not be deallocated. If the apartment would have the same strong reference toward the Person, they would create a retain cycle - which can be broken by the programmer at runtime if he knows about it, but otherwise it's just a memory leak. This is all the fuss about strong, weak and unowned: memory management at a higher level, because ARC does all the dirty stuff for us. Avoiding retain cycles is our job. – Ilea Cristian Nov 30 '14 at 11:19
25

Q1. How is an “Unowned reference” different from a “Weak Reference”?

Weak Reference:

A weak reference is a reference that does not keep a strong hold on the instance it refers to, and so does not stop ARC from disposing of the referenced instance. Because weak references are allowed to have “no value”, you must declare every weak reference as having an optional type. (Apple Docs)

Unowned Reference:

Like weak references, an unowned reference does not keep a strong hold on the instance it refers to. Unlike a weak reference, however, an unowned reference is assumed to always have a value. Because of this, an unowned reference is always defined as a non-optional type. (Apple Docs)

When to Use Each:

Use a weak reference whenever it is valid for that reference to become nil at some point during its lifetime. Conversely, use an unowned reference when you know that the reference will never be nil once it has been set during initialization. (Apple Docs)


Q2. When is it safe to use an “unowned reference”?

As quoted above, an unowned reference is assumed to always have a value. So you should only use it when you are sure that the reference will never be nil. Apple Docs illustrate a use-case for unowned references through the following example.

Suppose we have two classes Customer and CreditCard. A customer can exist without a credit card, but a credit card will not exist without a customer, i.e. it can be assumed that a credit card will always have a customer. So, they should have the following relationship:

class Customer {
    var card: CreditCard?
}

class CreditCard {
    unowned let customer: Customer
}

Q3. Are “unowned reference” reference an security risk like “dangling pointers” in C/C++

I don't think so.

Since unowned references are just weak references that are guaranteed to have a value, it shouldn't be a security risk in any way. However, if you try to access an unowned reference after the instance that it references is deallocated, you will trigger a runtime error, and the app will crash.

That's the only risk I see with it.

Link to Apple Docs

  • your Q2 example program simple to understand about unowned..thanks.. can you add same type of example for weak & strong.. – Ranjith Kumar Mar 27 '15 at 10:58
  • Excellent. Thank you. – Swifty McSwifterton Jun 14 '15 at 22:08
  • Can you include a common example for unowned or weak? – Honey Nov 11 '16 at 14:46
  • Consider objects parent & child, if child can't exist without a parent then use unowned for the property of parent in child class. weak is vise versa. Nice explanation @myxtic ! unowned references are just weak references that are guaranteed to have a value ! – Saif May 5 '17 at 10:54
23

If self could be nil in the closure use [weak self].

If self will never be nil in the closure use [unowned self].

If it's crashing when you use [unowned self] then self is probably nil at some point in that closure and you probably need to use [weak self] instead.

Check out the examples on using strong, weak, and unowned in closures:

https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/swift/conceptual/swift_programming_language/AutomaticReferenceCounting.html

  • 6
    Why not just use weak even if self can never be nil, no harm done right? – Boon Nov 24 '16 at 21:01
  • 2
    hi @Boon - that is indeed the critical question. – Fattie Jan 24 '17 at 14:16
  • [weak self] => If I use closure inside viewDidLoad(), how can self be nil? – Hassan Tareq Sep 26 '17 at 1:42
  • @HassanTareq, I think couple of good examples are referred in the article, mentioned above. Check "Resolving Strong Reference Cycles for Closures" section, esp. Quote: " Swift requires you to write self.someProperty or self.someMethod() (rather than just someProperty or someMethod()) whenever you refer to a member of self within a closure. This helps you remember that it’s possible to capture self by accident.” Excerpt From: Apple Inc. “The Swift Programming Language (Swift 4).” iBooks. itunes.apple.com/de/book/the-swift-programming-language-swift-4/…" – Nick Entin Nov 21 '17 at 11:13
  • @HassanTareq by the time the closure executes, which may be long in the future (http request for instance), the user might have already dismissed the view controller. If you use unowned in this case you'll crash the app. – nobre Mar 21 '18 at 13:47
4

Extracts from link

Few Concluding points

  • To determine if you even need to worry about strong, weak, or unowned, ask, “Am I dealing with reference types”. If you’re working with Structs or Enums, ARC isn’t managing the memory for those Types and you don’t even need to worry about specifying weak or unowned for those constants or variables.
  • Strong references are fine in hierarchical relationships where the parent references the child, but not vice-versa. In fact, strong references are the most appropraite kind of reference most of the time.
  • When two instances are optionally related to one another, make sure that one of those instances holds a weak reference to the other.
  • When two instances are related in such a way that one of the instances can’t exist without the other, the instance with the mandatory dependency needs to hold an unowned reference to the other instance.
0

Unowned references are a kind of weak reference used in the case of a Same-Lifetime relationship between two objects, when an object should only ever be owned by one other object. It's a way to create an immutable binding between an object and one of its properties.

In the example given in the intermediate swift WWDC video, a person owns a credit card, and a credit card can only have one holder. On the credit card, the person should not be an optional property, because you don't want to have a credit card floating around with only one owner. You could break this cycle by making the holder property on the credit a weak reference, but that also requires you to make it optional as well as variable (as opposed to constant). The unowned reference in this case means that although CreditCard does not have an owning stake in a Person, its life depends on it.

class Person {
    var card: CreditCard?
}

class CreditCard {

    unowned let holder: Person

    init (holder: Person) {
        self.holder = holder
    }
}
  • link to wwdc video or title ? – Osa Feb 17 at 22:39
0

ARC

ARC is a compile time feature that is Apple's version of automated memory management. It stands for Automatic Reference Counting. This means that it only frees up memory for objects when there are zero strong references to them.

STRONG

It's essentially a normal reference (pointer and all), but it's special in it's own right in that it protects the referred object from getting deallocated by ARC by increasing it's retain count by 1. In essence, as long as anything has a strong reference to an object, it will not be deallocated.

Generally, we are safe to use strong references when the hierarchy relationships of objects are linear. When a hierarchy of strong references flow from parent to child, then it's always ok to use strong references.

Resolving Strong Reference Cycles Between Class Instances

Important places to use weak and unowned variables are in cases where you have potential retain cycles. A retain cycle is what happens when two objects both have strong references to each other. If 2 objects have strong references to each other, ARC will not generate the appropriate release message code on each instance since they are keeping each other alive.

WEAK

A weak reference is just a pointer to an object that doesn't protect the object from being deallocated by ARC. While strong references increase the retain count of an object by 1, weak references do not. In addition, weak references zero out the pointer to your object when it successfully deallocates. This ensures that when you access a weak reference, it will either be a valid object, or nil.

ARC automatically sets a weak reference to nil when the instance that it refers to is deallocated. And, because weak references need to allow their value to be changed to nil at runtime, they are always declared as variables

Using

In a situation where two properties, both of which are allowed to be nil. This scenario is best resolved with a weak reference.

Use a weak reference when the other instance has a shorter lifetime—that is, when the other instance can be deallocated first.

UNOWNED

Unowned references, like weak references, do not increase the retain count of the object being referred. Unowned references are non-zeroing. This means that when the object is deallocated, it does not zero out the pointer. This means that use of unowned references can, in some cases, lead to dangling pointers.

ARC never sets an unowned reference’s value to nil, which means that unowned references are defined using non-optional types.


IMPORTANT.

Use an unowned reference only when you are sure that the reference always refers to an instance that has not been deallocated.

If you try to access the value of an unowned reference after that instance has been deallocated, you’ll get a runtime error - Attempted to read an unowned reference but object was already deallocated


NOTE

Swift also provides unsafe unowned references for cases where you need to disable runtime safety checks—for example, for performance reasons. As with all unsafe operations, you take on the responsibility for checking that code for safety.

You indicate an unsafe unowned reference by writing unowned(unsafe). If you try to access an unsafe unowned reference after the instance that it refers to is deallocated, your program will try to access the memory location where the instance used to be, which is an unsafe operation.

Using

In a situation where one property that is allowed to be nil and another property that cannot be nil. This scenario is best resolved with an unowned reference.

Use an unowned reference when the other instance has the same lifetime or a longer lifetime. Just like an implicitly unwrapped optional, If you can guarantee that the reference will not be nil at its point of use, use unowned. If not, then you should be using weak.

Strongly recommend read a doc and a source

-1

From Jon Hoffman's book “Mastering Swift 4.”:

The difference between a weak reference and an unowned reference is that the instance which a weak reference refers to can be nil, whereas the instance that an unowned reference is referring to cannot be nil. This means that when we use a weak reference, the property must be an optional property, since it can be nil.

-2

Use unowned when you are sure self can never be nil at the point you accessing self at that point.

Example (you can of course add the target directly from MyViewController, but again, it's a simple example).:

class MyViewController: UIViewController {
    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        let myButton = MyButton { [unowned self] in
            print("At this point, self can NEVER be nil. You are safe to use unowned.")
            print("This is because myButton can not be referenced without/outside this instance (myViewController)")
        }
    }
}

class MyButton: UIButton {
    var clicked: (() -> ())

    init(clicked: (() -> ())) {
        self.clicked = clicked

        // We use constraints to layout the view. We don't explicitly set the frame.
        super.init(frame: .zero)

        addTarget(self, action: #selector(clicked), for: .touchUpInside)
    }

    @objc private func sendClosure() {
        clicked()
    }
}

Use weak when there is a possibility self can be nil at the point you accessing self.

Example:

class MyViewController: UIViewController {
    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        NetworkManager.sharedInstance.receivedData = { [weak self] (data) in
            print("Can you guarentee that self is always available when the network manager received data?")
            print("Nope, you can't. Network manager will be alive, regardless of this particular instance of MyViewController")
            print("You should use weak self here, since you are not sure if this instance is still alive for every")
            print("future callback of network manager")
        }
    }
}

class NetworkManager {

    static let sharedInstance = NetworkManager()

    var receivedData: ((Data) -> ())?

    private func process(_ data: Data) {
        // process the data...

        // ... eventually notify a possible listener.
        receivedData?(data)
    }
}

Cons of unowned:

  • More efficient than weak
  • You can (well, you are forced) to mark the instance as immutable (not anymore since Swift 5.0).
  • Indicates to the reader of your code: This instance has a relationship to X and it can't live without it, but if X is gone, I am gone too.

Cons of weak:

  • More safe than unowned (since it can't crash).
  • Can create a relationship to X that goes in both ways, but both can live without each other.

If you aren't sure, use weak. Wait, I mean ask here on StackOverflow what you should do in your case! Using weak all the time when you shouldn't is just confusing for you and the reader of your code.

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