26

I was working on a C++11 project solely using clang++-3.4, and decided to compile using g++-4.8.2 in case there were any discrepancies in the errors produced. It turned out that g++ rejects some code that clang++ accepts. I have reduced the problem to the MWE given below.


enum { a };

template <class T>
struct foo
{
    static constexpr auto value = a;
};

int main()
{
    static constexpr auto r = foo<int>::value;
}

foo.cpp:5:23: error: ‘const<anonymous enum> foo<int>::value’, declared using anonymous type, is used but never defined [-fpermissive]

static const auto value = A;

I would like some help answering the following two questions:

  • Which compiler is correct in its interpretation of the standard? I am assuming that one compiler is right in either accepting or rejecting the code, and the other is wrong.

  • How can I work around this issue? I can't name the anonymous enum, because it is from a third-party library (in my case, the enums were Eigen::RowMajor and Eigen::ColMajor).

  • Did you define the variable? Or what is the error message? – Columbo Jun 3 '14 at 15:45
  • @Arcoth I don't think he has provided a definition, the error goes away if you do. Here's the error message. I think the question is whether referring to foo<T>::value constitutes odr-use. gcc seems to think yes, while clang thinks no. – Praetorian Jun 3 '14 at 15:59
  • @Praetorian Yes, sorry, I stupidly forgot to include the actual error message. – void-pointer Jun 3 '14 at 18:14
14

Who's to blame?

GCC is inaccurately rejecting your snippet, it is legal according to the C++11 Standard (N3337). Quotations with proof and explanation is located the end of this post.

workaround (A) - add the missing definition

template <class T>
struct foo {
    static constexpr auto value = a;
    typedef decltype(a) value_type;
};

template<class T>
constexpr typename foo<T>::value_type foo<T>::value;


workaround (B) - use the underlying-type of the enumeration as placeholder

#include <type_traits>

template <class T>
struct foo {
  static const std::underlying_type<decltype(a)>::type value = a;
};

What does the Standard say? (N3337)

As stated, the snippet is legal C++11, as can be read in the following quoted sections.


When can we use a type without linkage?

[basic.link]p8 has detailed wording that describes when a type is "without linkage", and it states that an unnamed enumeration count as such type.

[basic.link]p8 also explicitly states three contexts where such a type cannot be used, but not one of the contexts apply to our usage, so we are safe.

A type without linkage shall not be used as the type of a variable or function with external linkage unless

  • the entity has C language linkage (7.5), or
  • the entity is declared within an unnamed namespace (7.3.1), or
  • the entity is not odr-used (3.2) or is defined in the same translation unit


Are you sure we can use auto in such context?

Yes, and this can be proven by the following quote:

7.1.6.4p auto specifier [dcl.spec.auto]

A auto type-specifier can also be used in declaring a variable in the condition of a selection statement (6.4) or an iteration statement (6.5), in the type-specifier-seq in the new-type-id or type-id of a new-expression (5.3.4), in a for-range-declaration, and in declaring a static data member with a brace-or-equal-initializer that appears within the member-specification of a class definition (9.4.2).

  • Note: template<class T> struct foo { static constexpr auto value = a; } template<class T> constexpr decltype (foo<T>::value) foo<T>::value; should work as a workaround, but latest clang rejects it. currently investigating if it's a bug or not. – Filip Roséen - refp Jun 3 '14 at 17:20
  • Thanks for the comprehensive answer and workarounds. Did you file a report for the original bug in GCC yet? If you like, you can go ahead and do it. Otherwise, I can do the honors. – void-pointer Jun 3 '14 at 18:37
  • @void-pointer Honestly I was just about to do it, do you wanna write one up? If so; it's all yours. – Filip Roséen - refp Jun 3 '14 at 18:42
  • You can do it if you prefer; it's totally up to you. I was just offering in case you would rather someone else do it. – void-pointer Jun 3 '14 at 19:15
10

Which compiler is correct in its interpretation of the standard?

gcc is incorrect. §9.4.2/3:

A static data member of literal type can be declared in the class definition with the constexpr specifier; if so, its declaration shall specify a brace-or-equal-initializer in which every initializer-clause that is an assignment-expression is a constant expression. The member shall still be defined in a namespace scope if it is odr-used (3.2) in the program and the namespace scope definition shall not contain an initializer.

And the name is not odr-used as per §3.2:

A variable whose name appears as a potentially-evaluated expression is odr-used unless it is an object that satisfies the requirements for appearing in a constant expression (5.19) and the lvalue-to-rvalue conversion (4.1) is immediately applied.

This is indeed the case: It does satisfy the requirements for appearing in a constant expression and the lvalue-to-rvalue conversion is immediately applied (it is used as an initializer for an object). So GCC's rejection is incorrect.


A possible workaround is to define the member (but without a placeholder type). This definition is sufficient for both Clang and GCC:

template< typename T >
constexpr decltype(a) foo<T>::value;
  • AFAICT, this is the correct anwer (+1) – Belloc Oct 29 '15 at 12:17
5

Workaround with decltype:

enum { a };

template <class T>
struct foo
{
    static constexpr auto value = a;
};

template <class T>
constexpr decltype(a) foo<T>::value;

int main()
{
    static constexpr auto r = foo<int>::value;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.