137

So I can do this:

var stringNumb: NSString = "1357"

var someNumb: CInt = stringNumb.intValue

But I can't find the way to do it w/ a String. I'd like to do something like:

var stringNumb: String = "1357"

var someNumb: Int = Int(stringNumb)

This doesn't work either:

var someNumbAlt: Int = myString.integerValue
2
  • 1
    var someNumb: Int? = Int(stringNumb) or var someNumb = Int(stringNumb) Feb 3, 2016 at 21:39
  • Note that integerValue cleans dirty strings, if needed. For example these strings all result in 1357: "00001357", " 1357 ", "+ 1357", "1357.02", "1357 Main St"
    – Marcy
    Jun 3 at 19:08

12 Answers 12

181

Swift 2.0 you can initialize Integer using constructor

var stringNumber = "1234"
var numberFromString = Int(stringNumber)
4
  • 14
    As of Swift 2.0 you no longer have the toInt() method as part of String. So this Int constructor is now the only way to convert strings to ints. Jul 20, 2015 at 22:41
  • 1
    The semicolon is not necessary
    – Sebastian
    Sep 3, 2015 at 11:09
  • Can you please tell how to handle if the user enters number more than an Int64 limit number in the text field Jul 5, 2018 at 7:18
  • 1
    @Sebastian isn't that frustrating? :)
    – Victor
    Jan 31, 2019 at 20:25
94

I'd use:

var stringNumber = "1234"
var numberFromString = stringNumber.toInt()
println(numberFromString)

Note toInt():

If the string represents an integer that fits into an Int, returns the corresponding integer.

11
  • 5
    This worked, although if you declare the var explicitly, you need to add an exclamation point: var someNumb: Int = stringNumber.toInt()! as @NateCook pointed out
    – Logan
    Jun 3, 2014 at 15:44
  • I'm not declaring it explicitly. The compiler knows that numberFromString should be an int because it's initialised as one...
    – CW0007007
    Jun 3, 2014 at 15:45
  • I know that you are not, but I am. I had to make that adjustment to do so. Your code is correct, just adding it as a comment.
    – Logan
    Jun 3, 2014 at 15:47
  • Yes it only returns a value if the value fits into an Int as the note points out. Otherwise it returns nil...
    – CW0007007
    Jun 3, 2014 at 15:47
  • 5
    Instead of putting ! on the call, you can declare your variable as optional: someNumb: Int? = stringNumber.toInt(). Then the type safety system will be aware that foo may not exist. Putting ! will of course crash if your string can't convert to a number.
    – gwcoffey
    Jun 3, 2014 at 15:54
18

In Swift 3.0

Type 1: Convert NSString to String

    let stringNumb:NSString = "1357"
    let someNumb = Int(stringNumb as String) // 1357 as integer

Type 2: If the String has Integer only

    let stringNumb = "1357"
    let someNumb = Int(stringNumb) // 1357 as integer

Type 3: If the String has Float value

    let stringNumb = "13.57"
    if let stringToFloat = Float(stringNumb){
        let someNumb = Int(stringToFloat)// 13 as Integer
    }else{
       //do something if the stringNumb not have digit only. (i.e.,) let stringNumb = "13er4"
    }
1
  • The code for "Type 3" is not ideal. Instead of checking of stringToFloat is != nil, you should use if let.
    – rmaddy
    Jul 17, 2017 at 15:45
11

The method you want is toInt() -- you have to be a little careful, since the toInt() returns an optional Int.

let stringNumber = "1234"
let numberFromString = stringNumber.toInt()
// numberFromString is of type Int? with value 1234

let notANumber = "Uh oh"
let wontBeANumber = notANumber.toInt()
// wontBeANumber is of type Int? with value nil
2
  • but similarly, toInt() is the Right Way to do it. optionals are a core part of the language
    – Jiaaro
    Jun 3, 2014 at 15:48
  • Of course, you just have to be aware that you're working with an optional, not a straight Int.
    – Nate Cook
    Jun 3, 2014 at 15:50
6

If you are able to use a NSString only.

It's pretty similar to objective-c. All the data type are there but require the as NSString addition

    var x = "400.0" as NSString 

    x.floatValue //string to float
    x.doubleValue // to double
    x.boolValue // to bool
    x.integerValue // to integer
    x.intValue // to int

Also we have an toInt() function added See Apple Inc. “The Swift Programming Language.” iBooks. https://itun.es/us/jEUH0.l page 49

x.toInt()
2
  • forgot to add the as NSString. fixed it @gwcoffey Jun 3, 2014 at 15:46
  • 2
    I don't want to use NSString, see question.
    – Logan
    Jun 3, 2014 at 15:46
4

above answer didnt help me as my string value was "700.00"

with Swift 2.2 this works for me

let myString = "700.00"
let myInt = (myString as NSString).integerValue

I passed myInt to NSFormatterClass

let formatter = NSNumberFormatter()
formatter.numberStyle = .CurrencyStyle
formatter.maximumFractionDigits = 0

let priceValue = formatter.stringFromNumber(myInt!)!

//Now priceValue is ₹ 700

Thanks to this blog post.

3
  • 1
    This question is about getting an integer from a String. In your case, you don't have an Int, you have a Double. In Swift, just use Double() the same way we're using Int(). No need to use bridging to NSString.
    – Eric Aya
    Jul 29, 2016 at 11:45
  • Hey @EricD thanks for your suggestion but "I wanted Integer only as I am passing Int to NSNumberFormatter class for currency convertor".
    – swiftBoy
    Jul 29, 2016 at 11:51
  • 1
    Well in this case you can use Double() then use Int(). Like this: if let d = Double("700.00") { let i = Int(d); print (i) } :)
    – Eric Aya
    Jul 29, 2016 at 11:54
3

You can bridge from String to NSString and convert from CInt to Int like this:

var myint: Int = Int(stringNumb.bridgeToObjectiveC().intValue)
1

I wrote an extension for that purpose. It always returns an Int. If the string does not fit into an Int, 0 is returned.

extension String {
    func toTypeSafeInt() -> Int {
        if let safeInt = self.toInt() {
            return safeInt
        } else {
            return 0
        }
    }
}
1
  • 3
    This can be written more succinctly as return self.toInt() ?? 0. It's probably better to just write it that way inline rather than having an extension method for this.
    – jlong64
    Jan 13, 2015 at 3:15
0

A more general solution could be a extension

extension String {
    var toFloat:Float {
        return Float(self.bridgeToObjectiveC().floatValue)
    }
    var toDouble:Double {
        ....
    }
    ....
}

this for example extends the swift native String object by toFloat

0

8:1 Odds(*)

var stringNumb: String = "1357"
var someNumb = Int(stringNumb)

or

var stringNumb: String = "1357"
var someNumb:Int? = Int(stringNumb)

Int(String) returns an optional Int?, not an Int.


Safe use: do not explicitly unwrap

let unwrapped:Int = Int(stringNumb) ?? 0

or

if let stringNumb:Int = stringNumb { ... }

(*) None of the answers actually addressed why var someNumb: Int = Int(stringNumb) was not working.

1
  • Thank you @user3441734. I should not have used casting. Feb 4, 2016 at 5:43
0

Simple but dirty way

// Swift 1.2
if let intValue = "42".toInt() {
    let number1 = NSNumber(integer:intValue)
}
// Swift 2.0
let number2 = Int(stringNumber)

// Using NSNumber
let number3 = NSNumber(float:("42.42" as NSString).floatValue)

The extension-way

This is better, really, because it'll play nicely with locales and decimals.

extension String {

    var numberValue:NSNumber? {
        let formatter = NSNumberFormatter()
        formatter.numberStyle = .DecimalStyle
        return formatter.numberFromString(self)
    }
}

Now you can simply do:

let someFloat = "42.42".numberValue
let someInt = "42".numberValue
0

Convert String to Int in Swift 2.0:

var str:NSString = Data as! NSString
var cont:Int = str.integerValue

use .integerValue or intValue for Int32

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