I have been working to create a UIAlertView in Swift, but for some reason I can't get the statement right because I'm getting this error:

Could not find an overload for 'init' that accepts the supplied arguments

Here is how I have it written:

let button2Alert: UIAlertView = UIAlertView(title: "Title", message: "message",
                     delegate: self, cancelButtonTitle: "OK", otherButtonTitles: nil)

Then to call it I'm using:

button2Alert.show()

As of right now it is crashing and I just can't seem to get the syntax right.

  • 5
    UIAlertView and UIActionSheet has been replaced by UIAlertController in iOS 8, have you looked at this? – Popeye Jun 3 '14 at 18:51
  • Make sure the class that self belongs to adopts the protocol UIAlertViewDelegate (the recommended way to do this, in Swift, is with an extension). – Nicolas Miari Jul 14 '15 at 7:37
  • @Adam: I have reverted your retagging. The swift3 tag is for "questions directly related to changes in version 3 of Apple's Swift programming language." And I don't think that "If the answers make it clear that the problem in the question was caused by something other than what the asker thought, retagging is very helpful." from meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/252079/… applies here. – Martin R Jul 13 '17 at 14:13
  • 1
    @MartinR I don't know how questions can be updated to show that there are answers that apply to a current version of Swift; there is a lot of old, useless stuff here and [swift] finds it all along with the useful. I don't feel strongly about this retag being reverted but I wish there was a definitive way to solve this problem. (I wish answers had tags.) – Adam Eberbach Jul 14 '17 at 0:50

30 Answers 30

up vote 763 down vote accepted

From the UIAlertView class:

// UIAlertView is deprecated. Use UIAlertController with a preferredStyle of UIAlertControllerStyleAlert instead

On iOS 8, you can do this:

let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Alert", message: "Message", preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.Alert)
alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Click", style: UIAlertActionStyle.Default, handler: nil))
self.presentViewController(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)

Now UIAlertController is a single class for creating and interacting with what we knew as UIAlertViews and UIActionSheets on iOS 8.

Edit: To handle actions:

alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .Default, handler: { action in
    switch action.style{
    case .Default:
        print("default")

    case .Cancel:
        print("cancel")

    case .Destructive:
        print("destructive")
    }
}}))

Edit for Swift 3:

let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Alert", message: "Message", preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.alert)
alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Click", style: UIAlertActionStyle.default, handler: nil))
self.present(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)

Edit for Swift 4:

let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Alert", message: "Message", preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.alert)
alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .default, handler: { action in
      switch action.style{
      case .default:
            print("default")

      case .cancel:
            print("cancel")

      case .destructive:
            print("destructive")


}}))
self.present(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)
  • 3
    Where did you see that UIAlertView is deprecated? I don't see that in the documentation? – BlueBear Jun 3 '14 at 18:58
  • 7
    Cmd + Click the UIAlertView class, and the comment is right on top of the class declaration. – Oscar Swanros Jun 3 '14 at 19:00
  • 2
    I'll answer my own question for anyone else who's curious alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Cancel", style: UIAlertActionStyle.Cancel, handler: { (ACTION :UIAlertAction!)in })) – altyus Jun 3 '14 at 20:27
  • 4
    What's the point of Cancel and Destructive cases since it will always be what you specified .Default? – User Sep 21 '14 at 3:42
  • 3
    Reading this answer the switch case you did is unnecessary. The switch is only useful if the type, or title aren't hardcoded ie they are dynamic: You might have a series of dynamic buttons so the titles are not hardcoded. And then the handler might need to pass the chosen title off to some other method call – Honey Nov 30 '16 at 17:27
up vote 355 down vote
+50

One Button

One Button Screenshot

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    @IBAction func showAlertButtonTapped(_ sender: UIButton) {

        // create the alert
        let alert = UIAlertController(title: "My Title", message: "This is my message.", preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.alert)

        // add an action (button)
        alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: UIAlertActionStyle.default, handler: nil))

        // show the alert
        self.present(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)
    }
}

Two Buttons

Two Button Alert Screenshot

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    @IBAction func showAlertButtonTapped(_ sender: UIButton) {

        // create the alert
        let alert = UIAlertController(title: "UIAlertController", message: "Would you like to continue learning how to use iOS alerts?", preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.alert)

        // add the actions (buttons)
        alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Continue", style: UIAlertActionStyle.default, handler: nil))
        alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Cancel", style: UIAlertActionStyle.cancel, handler: nil))

        // show the alert
        self.present(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)
    }
}

Three Buttons

enter image description here

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    @IBAction func showAlertButtonTapped(_ sender: UIButton) {

        // create the alert
        let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Notice", message: "Lauching this missile will destroy the entire universe. Is this what you intended to do?", preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.alert)

        // add the actions (buttons)
        alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Remind Me Tomorrow", style: UIAlertActionStyle.default, handler: nil))
        alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Cancel", style: UIAlertActionStyle.cancel, handler: nil))
        alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Launch the Missile", style: UIAlertActionStyle.destructive, handler: nil))

        // show the alert
        self.present(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)
    }
}

Handling Button Taps

The handler was nil in the above examples. You can replace nil with a closure to do something when the user taps a button. For example:

alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Launch the Missile", style: UIAlertActionStyle.destructive, handler: { action in

    // do something like...
    self.launchMissile()

}))

Notes

  • Multiple buttons do not necessarily need to use different UIAlertActionStyle types. They could all be .default.
  • For more than three buttons consider using an Action Sheet. The setup is very similar. Here is an example.
  • 1
    is there any delegate property in UIAlertController? in UIAlertView there is a delegate property which we sometime set to self, Is there any nothing like this in UIAlertController?? I am New , please help me – ArgaPK Nov 1 '17 at 6:03

You can create a UIAlert using the standard constructor, but the 'legacy' one seems to not work:

let alert = UIAlertView()
alert.title = "Alert"
alert.message = "Here's a message"
alert.addButtonWithTitle("Understood")
alert.show()
  • 7
    UIAlertView is deprecated. Use UIAlertController with a preferredStyle of UIAlertControllerStyleAlert instead. – Zorayr Jan 12 '15 at 3:00
  • 14
    @Zorayr UIAlertController is only available from iOS 8 onwards, please also mention that when suggesting its use. There are situations where iOS7 support is still desired and people might miss the problem. Deprecation doesn't mean "don't ever use this anymore." – Sami Kuhmonen Apr 2 '15 at 7:38
  • 2
    This works if your app is still targeting iOS 7. However, ideally UIAlertView should only be used when UIAlertController is not available. if NSClassFromString("UIAlertController") != nil { /* use UIAlertController * / } else { /* use UIAlertView * / } – phatblat Apr 16 '15 at 17:01
  • UIAlertview() is now deprecated in iOS 9 – Rizwan Ahmed Sep 27 '15 at 7:33

Click of View

@IBAction func testClick(sender: UIButton) {

  var uiAlert = UIAlertController(title: "Title", message: "Message", preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.Alert)
  self.presentViewController(uiAlert, animated: true, completion: nil)

  uiAlert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Ok", style: .Default, handler: { action in
   println("Click of default button")
  }))

  uiAlert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Cancel", style: .Cancel, handler: { action in
   println("Click of cancel button")
  }))

}

Done with two buttons OK & Cancel

If you're targeting iOS 7 and 8, you need something like this to make sure you're using the right method for each version, because UIAlertView is deprecated in iOS 8, but UIAlertController is not available in iOS 7:

func alert(title: String, message: String) {
    if let getModernAlert: AnyClass = NSClassFromString("UIAlertController") { // iOS 8
        let myAlert: UIAlertController = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, preferredStyle: .Alert)
        myAlert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .Default, handler: nil))
        self.presentViewController(myAlert, animated: true, completion: nil)
    } else { // iOS 7
        let alert: UIAlertView = UIAlertView()
        alert.delegate = self

        alert.title = title
        alert.message = message
        alert.addButtonWithTitle("OK")

        alert.show()
    }
}
  • Or you can save time and just use UIAlertView until you drop support for iOS 7. Apple won't reject your app for that. – cprcrack Jan 19 '15 at 16:17
  • 2
    Deprecation doesn't mean "don't use this" or that it would be the "wrong method", it just means it will not work later on. There's no need to specifically use UIAlertController on iOS8 if one just needs basic alerts. They will work as before. There are many APIs that have been deprecated in iOS4 or 5 and still work in iOS8. But of course apps targeting a higher iOS level should not use them and that's why there is a deprecation warning. – Sami Kuhmonen Apr 2 '15 at 7:47
  • 1
    @SamiKuhmonen No, but it makes it clearer why you're doing what you're doing and makes it easier to remove support for deprecated methods when your minimum version is high enough to do so. – AstroCB Apr 2 '15 at 10:17

Show UIAlertView in swift language :-

Protocol UIAlertViewDelegate

let alert = UIAlertView(title: "alertView", message: "This is alertView", delegate:self, cancelButtonTitle:"Cancel", otherButtonTitles: "Done", "Delete")
alert.show()

Show UIAlertViewController in swift language :-

let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Error", message: "Enter data in Text fields", preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.Alert)
alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: UIAlertActionStyle.Default, handler: nil))
self.presentViewController(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)
  • This answers the question directly and is correct – Fraser Aug 19 '15 at 1:29

Simply do not provide otherButtonTitles in the constructor.

let alertView = UIAlertView(title: "Oops!", message: "Something
happened...", delegate: nil, cancelButtonTitle: "OK")

alertView.show()

But I do agree with Oscar, this class is deprecated in iOS 8, so there won't be no use of UIAlertView if you're doing an iOS 8 only app. Otherwise the code above will work.

With the protocol extensions of Swift 2, you can make a protocol that provides a default implementation to your view controllers:

ShowsAlert.swift

import UIKit

protocol ShowsAlert {}

extension ShowsAlert where Self: UIViewController {
    func showAlert(title: String = "Error", message: String) {
        let alertController = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, preferredStyle: .Alert)
        alertController.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Ok", style: .Default, handler: nil))
        presentViewController(alertController, animated: true, completion: nil)
    }
}

ViewController.swift

class ViewController: UIViewController, ShowsAlert {
    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        showAlert(message: "Hey there, I am an error message!")
    }
}
  • 1
    Works perfectly. For Swift3 change 'presentViewController' to 'present'. – Vincent Jan 18 '17 at 8:38

I found this one,

var alertView = UIAlertView();
alertView.addButtonWithTitle("Ok");
alertView.title = "title";
alertView.message = "message";
alertView.show();

not good though, but it works :)

Update:

but I have found on header file as:

extension UIAlertView {
    convenience init(title: String, message: String, delegate: UIAlertViewDelegate?, cancelButtonTitle: String?, otherButtonTitles firstButtonTitle: String, _ moreButtonTitles: String...)
}

somebody may can explain this.

  • Apparently UIAlertView has been deprecated in iOS 8 and we now use UIAlertController with a preferred style of UIAlertControllerStyleAlert. – BlueBear Jun 3 '14 at 19:06
  • 6
    If you run an app that needs to be backwards compatible to iOS7.1 and you're writing it in Swift, the UIAlertController will crash the target device. You need to support the legacy UIAlertViews for iOS7. – Joe Jun 22 '14 at 4:02
  • I think that it's not Swift that would cause a crash, but rather the fact that the UIAlertController is not available before iOS 8 – Frédéric Adda Aug 24 '14 at 20:12

For SWIFT4, I think, extending UIViewController and creating a reusable confirmation control is the most elegant way.

You can extend the UIViewController as below:

extension UIViewController {

func AskConfirmation (title:String, message:String, completion:@escaping (_ result:Bool) -> Void) {
    let alert = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.alert)
    self.present(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)

    alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Ok", style: .default, handler: { action in
        completion(true)
    }))

    alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Cancel", style: .cancel, handler: { action in
        completion(false)
    }))
  }
}

Then you can use it anytime:

 AskConfirmation(title: "YOUR MESSAGE TITLE", message: "YOUR MESSAGE") { (result) in
        if result { //User has clicked on Ok

        } else { //User has clicked on Cancel

        }
    }
    class Preview: UIViewController , UIAlertViewDelegate
    {
        @IBAction func MoreBtnClicked(sender: AnyObject)
        {
            var moreAlert=UIAlertView(title: "Photo", message: "", delegate: self, cancelButtonTitle: "No Thanks!", otherButtonTitles: "Save Image", "Email", "Facebook", "Whatsapp" )
            moreAlert.show()
            moreAlert.tag=111;
        }

        func alertView(alertView: UIAlertView, didDismissWithButtonIndex buttonIndex: Int)
        {
            if alertView.tag==111
            {
                if buttonIndex==0
                {
                    println("No Thanks!")
                }
                else if buttonIndex==1
                {
                    println("Save Image")
                }
                else if buttonIndex == 2
                {
                    println("Email")
                }
                else if buttonIndex == 3
                {
                    println("Facebook")
                }
                else if buttonIndex == 4
                {
                    println("Whatsapp")
                }
            }
        }
    }
  • Just writing a lump of code is not very useful. When answering any question (specially an old question with several answers including an accepted answer) please write more than a piece of code. Please add an explanation of what your code does, how it answers the question and how it is different (or better) than the other answers. – AdrianHHH Jul 10 '15 at 13:00
  • Fantastic answer, Jayesh, thanks for that. – Fattie Dec 15 '16 at 23:37

I have another trick. Suppose you have 5 classes where a logout alert to be applied. Try with swift class extension.

File- New- Swift class- Name it.

Add the following:

public extension UIViewController
{

    func makeLogOutAlert()
    {
        var refreshAlert = UIAlertController(title: "Log Out", message: "Are You Sure to Log Out ? ", preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.Alert)

        refreshAlert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Confirm", style: .Default, handler: { (action: UIAlertAction!) in
            self.navigationController?.popToRootViewControllerAnimated(true)
        }))

        refreshAlert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Cancel", style: .Default, handler: { (action: UIAlertAction!) in
            refreshAlert .dismissViewControllerAnimated(true, completion: nil)
        }))

        presentViewController(refreshAlert, animated: true, completion: nil)
    }
}

Implement using : self.makeLogOutAlert(). Hope it helps.

I have made a singleton class to make this convenient to use from anywhere in your app: https://github.com/Swinny1989/Swift-Popups

You can then create a popup with multiple buttons like this:

Popups.SharedInstance.ShowAlert(self, title: "Title goes here", message: "Messages goes here", buttons: ["button one" , "button two"]) { (buttonPressed) -> Void in
    if buttonPressed == "button one" { 
      //Code here
    } else if buttonPressed == "button two" {
        // Code here
    }
}

or popups with a single button like this:

Popups.SharedInstance.ShowPopup("Title goes here", message: "Message goes here.")
  • Thanks. I submit some issue there – djdance Jan 7 '16 at 19:32
  • 1
    Hey @Swinny89 Thanks so much man for sharing this solution with us! I got stuck with the closure thing and you just saved me! – Bruno Campos Mar 29 at 17:15

Swift 3

The following is a simple example of how to create a simple alert with one button with Swift 3.

let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Title",
                              message: "Message",
                              preferredStyle: .alert)
alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Ok", style: .default))
present(alert, animated: true)

In the above example the handle callback of the action has been omitted because the default behaviour of an alert view with one button is to disappear when the button is clicked.

Here is how to create another action, which could be added to the alert with "alert.addAction(action)". The different styles are .default, .destructive and .cancel.

let action = UIAlertAction(title: "Ok", style: .default) { action in
    // Handle when button is clicked    
}

I got the following UIAlertView initialization code to compile without errors (I thing the last, varyadic part is tricky perhaps). But I had to make sure the class of self (which I am passing as the delegate) was adopting the UIAlertViewDelegate protocol for the compile errors to go away:

let alertView = UIAlertView(
                  title: "My Title",
                  message: "My Message",
                  delegate: self,
                  cancelButtonTitle: "Cancel",
                  otherButtonTitles: "OK"
                )

By the way, this is the error I was getting (as of Xcode 6.4):

Cannot find an initializer for type 'UIAlertView' that accepts an argument list of type '(title: String, message: String, delegate: MyViewController, cancelButtonTitle: String, otherButtonTitles: String)'

As others mentioned, you should migrate to UIAlertController if you can target iOS 8.x+. To support iOS 7, use the code above (iOS 6 is not supported by Swift).

The reason it doesn't work because some value you passed to the function isn't correct. swift doesn't like Objective-C, you can put nil to arguments which are class type without any restriction(might be). Argument otherButtonTitles is defined as non-optional which its type do not have (?)at its end. so you must pass a concrete value to it.

@IBAction func Alert(sender: UIButton) {

    var alertView:UIAlertView = UIAlertView()
    alertView.title = "Alert!"
    alertView.message = "Message"
    alertView.delegate = self
    alertView.addButtonWithTitle("OK")

    alertView.show()

}

Try this

Use this code to display an alertview

  let alertController = UIAlertController(title: "Hello  Coders", message: "your alert message", preferredStyle: .Alert)
        let defaultAction = UIAlertAction(title: "Close Alert", style: .Default, handler: nil)
        alertController.addAction(defaultAction)

        presentViewController(alertController, animated: true, completion: nil)

Reference: Swift Show Alert using UIAlertController

in xcode 9

let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Alert", message: "message", preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.alert)
alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Ok", style: UIAlertActionStyle.default, handler: nil))
self.present(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)
 let alertController = UIAlertController(title: "Select Photo", message: "Select atleast one photo", preferredStyle: .alert)
    let action1 = UIAlertAction(title: "From Photo", style: .default) { (action) in
        print("Default is pressed.....")
    }
    let action2 = UIAlertAction(title: "Cancel", style: .cancel) { (action) in
        print("Cancel is pressed......")
    }
    let action3 = UIAlertAction(title: "Click new", style: .default) { (action) in
        print("Destructive is pressed....")

    }
    alertController.addAction(action1)
    alertController.addAction(action2)
    alertController.addAction(action3)
    self.present(alertController, animated: true, completion: nil)

}

Here is a funny example in Swift:

private func presentRandomJoke() {
  if let randomJoke: String = jokesController.randomJoke() {
    let alertController: UIAlertController = UIAlertController(title:nil, message:randomJoke, preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.Alert)
    alertController.addAction(UIAlertAction(title:"Done", style:UIAlertActionStyle.Default, handler:nil))
    presentViewController(alertController, animated:true, completion:nil)
  }
}

Here is a pretty simple function of AlertView in Swift :

class func globalAlertYesNo(msg: String) {
        let alertView = UNAlertView(title: "Title", message: msg)

        alertView.messageAlignment = NSTextAlignment.Center
        alertView.buttonAlignment  = UNButtonAlignment.Horizontal

        alertView.addButton("Yes", action: {

            print("Yes action")

        })

        alertView.addButton("No", action: {

            print("No action")

        })

        alertView.show()

    }

You have to pass message as a String where you use this function.

The Old Way: UIAlertView

let alertView = UIAlertView(title: "Default Style", message: "A standard alert.", delegate: self, cancelButtonTitle: "Cancel", otherButtonTitles: "OK")
alertView.alertViewStyle = .Default
alertView.show()

// MARK: UIAlertViewDelegate

 func alertView(alertView: UIAlertView, clickedButtonAtIndex buttonIndex: Int) {
 switch buttonIndex {

    // ...
   }
  }

The New Way: UIAlertController

let alertController = UIAlertController(title: "Default Style", message: "A standard alert.", preferredStyle: .Alert)

let cancelAction = UIAlertAction(title: "Cancel", style: .Cancel) { (action) in
// ...
 }
 alertController.addAction(cancelAction)

 let OKAction = UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .Default) { (action) in
// ...
 }
 alertController.addAction(OKAction)
 self.presentViewController(alertController, animated: true) {
 // ...
}

on IOS 9, you can do this

let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Alert", message: "Message", preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.alert)
alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Click", style: UIAlertActionStyle.default, handler: nil))
self.present(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)

// Generic Class For UIAlertView

//MARK:- MODULES
import Foundation
import UIKit

//MARK:- CLASS
class Alert  : NSObject{

static let shared = Alert()

var okAction : AlertSuccess?
typealias AlertSuccess = (()->())?
var alert: UIAlertController?

/** show */
public func show(title : String?, message : String?, viewController : UIViewController?, okAction : AlertSuccess = nil) {

    let version : NSString = UIDevice.current.systemVersion as NSString
    if  version.doubleValue >= 8 {
        alert = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, preferredStyle:.alert)
        alert?.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .default, handler: { (action: UIAlertAction) in

            if let okAction = okAction {
                okAction()
            }
        }))
        viewController?.present(alert ?? UIAlertController(), animated:true, completion:nil);
    }
}

/** showWithCancelAndOk */
public func showWithCancelAndOk(title : String, okTitle : String, cancelTitle : String, message : String, viewController : UIViewController?, okAction : AlertSuccess = nil, cancelAction : AlertSuccess = nil) {
    let version:NSString = UIDevice.current.systemVersion as NSString;

    if  version.doubleValue >= 8 {
        alert = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, preferredStyle:.alert)

        alert?.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: cancelTitle, style: .default, handler: { (action: UIAlertAction) in

            if let cancelAction = cancelAction {
                cancelAction()
            }
        }))
        alert?.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: okTitle, style: .default, handler: { (action: UIAlertAction) in

            if let okAction = okAction {
                okAction()
            }
        }))
        viewController?.present(alert!, animated:true, completion:nil);
    }
}

/** showWithTimer */
public func showWithTimer(message : String?, viewController : UIViewController?) {

    let version : NSString = UIDevice.current.systemVersion as NSString
    if  version.doubleValue >= 8 {
        alert = UIAlertController(title: "", message: message, preferredStyle:.alert)
        viewController?.present(alert ?? UIAlertController(), animated:true, completion:nil)
        let when = DispatchTime.now() + 1
        DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: when){
            self.alert?.dismiss(animated: true, completion: nil)
        }
    }
}
}

Use:-

Alert.shared.show(title: "No Internet Connection", message: "The internet connection appers to be offline.", viewController: self) //without ok action

Alert.shared.show(title: "No Internet Connection", message: "The internet connection appers to be offline.", viewController: self, okAction: {
                            //ok action
                        }) // with ok action

Alert.shared.show(title: "No Internet Connection", message: "The internet connection appers to be offline.", viewController: self, okAction: {
                            //ok action 
}, cancelAction: {
 //cancel action
}) //with cancel and ok action

Alert.shared.showWithTimer(message : "This is an alert with timer", viewController : self) //with timer
  // UIAlertView is deprecated. Use UIAlertController 
  // title = title of the alert view.
  // message = Alert message you want to show.
  // By tap on "OK" , Alert view will dismiss.

 UIAlertView(title: "Alert", message: "Enter Message here.", delegate: nil, cancelButtonTitle: "OK").show()
  • Can you please add an explanation to the code you posted? As it is now, your answer does not really qualify as a good answer by SO rules. – Nico Van Belle May 4 at 7:42
  • alert view has changed now in swift 4.use alert controller – Sandeep Singh May 15 at 7:54

SWIFT 4 : Simply create a extension to UIViewController as follows:

   extension  UIViewController{

   func showSucsessAlert(withTitle title: String, andMessage 
    message:String){
        let alert = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, 
         preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.alert)
        alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: 
        UIAlertActionStyle.default, handler: nil))
        self.present(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)
         }
    }

Now in your viewcontroller, directly call above function as if they are provided by UIViewController.

    yourViewController.showSucsessAlert(withTitle: 
      "YourTitle", andMessage: "YourCustomTitle")
  • Generally, answers are much more helpful if they include an explanation of what the code is intended to do, and why that solves the problem without introducing others. Thanks for improving the answer's reference value and making it more understandable! – Tim Diekmann Jun 3 at 13:58

try This. Put Bellow Code In Button.

let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Your_Title_Text", message: "Your_MSG", preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.alert)
alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Your_Text", style: UIAlertActionStyle.default, handler: nil))
self.present(alert, animated:true, completion: nil)

Below is the reusable code for alert view and action sheet, Just write one line to show alert anywhere in application

class AlertView{

    static func show(title:String? = nil,message:String?,preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle = .alert,buttons:[String] = ["Ok"],completionHandler:@escaping (String)->Void){
        let alert = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, preferredStyle: preferredStyle)

        for button in buttons{

            var style = UIAlertActionStyle.default
            let buttonText = button.lowercased().replacingOccurrences(of: " ", with: "")
            if buttonText == "cancel"{
                style = .cancel
            }
            let action = UIAlertAction(title: button, style: style) { (_) in
                completionHandler(button)
            }
            alert.addAction(action)
        }

        DispatchQueue.main.async {
            if let app = UIApplication.shared.delegate as? AppDelegate, let rootViewController = app.window?.rootViewController {
                rootViewController.present(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)
            }

        }
    }
}

Usage :

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    override func viewWillAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
        AlertView.show(title: "Alert", message: "Are you sure ?", preferredStyle: .alert, buttons: ["Yes","No"]) { (button) in
            print(button)
        }
    }

}

In Swift 4.1 and Xcode 9.4.1

let alert = UIAlertController(title: ""Your title, message: "Your message", preferredStyle: .alert)

     let defaultAction = UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .default, handler: { action in
     })
     alert.addAction(defaultAction)
     DispatchQueue.main.async(execute: {
        self.present(alert, animated: true)
})

If you want Shared class style(Write once use every where)

import UIKit
class SharedClass: NSObject {//This is shared class
static let sharedInstance = SharedClass()

    //Show alert
    func alert(view: UIViewController, title: String, message: String) {
        let alert = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, preferredStyle: .alert)
        let defaultAction = UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .default, handler: { action in
        })
        alert.addAction(defaultAction)
        DispatchQueue.main.async(execute: {
            view.present(alert, animated: true)
        })
    }

    private override init() {
    }
}

Now call alert like this in every ware

SharedClass.SharedInstance.alert(view: self, title: "Your title here", message: "Your message here")

protected by Nilesh Rathod Apr 18 at 5:00

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