0

I'm working in a large codebase and came across this file with just the following in it:

window.hasTouch = (function() {
    // will return 'true' if user is visiting with a touch-capable device
    return ('ontouchstart' in document.documentElement);
});

Then window.hasTouch is called in the following way in another file:

hasTouch = window.hasTouch();

My question is, sometimes in console, calling it with () returns an error of:

TypeError: boolean is not a function

And then when I run it just as "hasTouch = window.hasTouch" (parens omitted), it returns true/false like I want.

Can someone please clarify in this setup what's ideal way to call window.hasTouch?

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If you want you want window.hasTouch to be a bool instead of a function you can simply do:

window.hasTouch = 'ontouchstart' in document.documentElement;

Otherwise, you can evaluate the anonymous function immediately:

window.hasTouch = (function() {
    // will return 'true' if user is visiting with a touch-capable device
    return ('ontouchstart' in document.documentElement);
})(); // <-- note the extra parens
1

By assigning hasTouch globally you overwrite window.hasTouch so that function is lost. If you want to avoid this, use var hasTouch = ... inside a function.

Also, your code is not an IIFE - you just assign the function to window.hasTouch. An IIFE would have () after the function definition to call it immediately and assign its return value instead.

  • I suspected it's not an IIFE, but what about the function being completely wrapped in parens, can you clarify what that's doing then (if not making it an IIFE) – R V Jun 3 '14 at 20:47
  • @RV—In javascript, "(" and ")" are punctuators, i.e. punctuation marks. They are used to group things. In the case of (function(){...}) they have no effect on evaluation. They are used in an IIFE to create a function expression (where the name can be omitted) rather than a function declaration. Another pattern is !function(){}(). Putting () after a function reference indicates a parameter list, and a function reference followed by a (possibly empty) parameter list causes the function to be called and passed the parameters. HTH :-) – RobG Jun 3 '14 at 21:00

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