Is there a function that I can use to iterate over an array and have both index and element, like python's enumerate?

for index, element in enumerate(list):
    ...

12 Answers 12

up vote 1292 down vote accepted

Yes. As of Swift 3.0, if you need the index for each element along with its value, you can use the enumerated() method to iterate over the array. It returns a sequence of pairs composed of the index and the value for each item in the array. For example:

for (index, element) in list.enumerated() {
  print("Item \(index): \(element)")
}

Before Swift 3.0 and after Swift 2.0, the function was called enumerate():

for (index, element) in list.enumerate() {
    print("Item \(index): \(element)")
}

Prior to Swift 2.0, enumerate was a global function.

for (index, element) in enumerate(list) {
    println("Item \(index): \(element)")
}
  • 3
    Although it seems like a tuple, in Swift 1.2 - not sure about 2.0 - enumerate returns an EnumerateSequence<base: SequenceType> struct. – nstein Jul 3 '15 at 12:52
  • 13
    Does this add a performance overhead? – Leviathlon Sep 28 '15 at 8:11
  • 3
    enumerate(list) doesn't work in Swift 2.1. – Lumialxk Mar 21 '16 at 6:57
  • 13
    Can't upvote an answer with 666 votes :( – Iulian Onofrei Nov 19 '16 at 2:43
  • 16
    Maybe they'll change to the gerund, enumerating for Swift 4. Exciting! – Dan Rosenstark Mar 22 '17 at 14:40

Swift 3 provides a method called enumerated() for Array. enumerated() has the following declaration:

func enumerated() -> EnumeratedSequence<Array<Element>>

Returns a sequence of pairs (n, x), where n represents a consecutive integer starting at zero, and x represents an element of the sequence.


In the simplest cases, you may use enumerated() with a for loop. For example:

let list = ["Car", "Bike", "Plane", "Boat"]
for (index, element) in list.enumerate() {
    print(index, ":", element)
}

/*
prints:
0 : Car
1 : Bike
2 : Plane
3 : Boat
*/

Note however that you're not limited to use enumerated() with a for loop. In fact, if you plan to use enumerated() with a for loop for something similar to the following code, you're doing it wrong:

let list = [Int](1...5)
var arrayOfTuples = [(Int, Int)]()

for (index, element) in list.enumerated() {
    arrayOfTuples += [(index, element)]
}

print(arrayOfTuples) // prints [(0, 1), (1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 4), (4, 5)]

The correct way to do this is:

let list = [Int](1...5)
let arrayOfTuples = Array(list.enumerated())
print(arrayOfTuples) // prints [(0, 1), (1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 4), (4, 5)]

As an alternative, you may also use enumerated() with map:

let list = [Int](1...5)
let arrayOfDictionaries = list.enumerated().map { (a, b) in return [a : b] }
print(arrayOfDictionaries) // prints [[0: 1], [1: 2], [2: 3], [3: 4], [4: 5]]

Moreover, although it has some limitations, forEach can be a good replacement to a for loop:

let list = [Int](1...5)
list.reversed().enumerated().forEach { print($0, ":", $1) }

/*
prints:
0 : 5
1 : 4
2 : 3
3 : 2
4 : 1
*/

By using enumerated() and makeIterator(), you can even iterate manually on your Array. For example:

import UIKit

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    var generator = ["Car", "Bike", "Plane", "Boat"].enumerated().makeIterator()

    // Link this IBAction to a UIButton in your storyboard
    @IBAction func iterate(_ sender: UIButton) {
        let tuple: (offset: Int, element: String)? = generator.next()
        print(String(describing: tuple))
    }

}

/*
 Will print the following lines for 6 `touch up inside`:
 Optional((0, "Car"))
 Optional((1, "Bike"))
 Optional((2, "Plane"))
 Optional((3, "Boat"))
 nil
 nil
 */
  • 3
    A much more complete and up-to-date answer than the accepted one. Thanks! – mm2001 Feb 13 '16 at 23:43
  • 1
    Is getting access to the index the only benefit of using enumerate? – Honey Dec 9 '16 at 1:23

Starting with Swift 2, the enumerate function needs to be called on the collection like so:

for (index, element) in list.enumerate() {
    print("Item \(index): \(element)")
}

I found this answer while looking for a way to do that with a Dictionary, and it turns out it's quite easy to adapt it, just pass a tuple for the element.

// Swift 2

var list = ["a": 1, "b": 2]

for (index, (letter, value)) in list.enumerate() {
    print("Item \(index): \(letter) \(value)")
}

Basic enumerate

for (index, element) in arrayOfValues.enumerate() {
// do something useful
}

or with Swift 3...

for (index, element) in arrayOfValues.enumerated() {
// do something useful
}

Enumerate, Filter and Map

However, I most often use enumerate in combination with map or filter. For example with operating on a couple of arrays.

In this array I wanted to filter odd or even indexed elements and convert them from Ints to Doubles. So enumerate() gets you index and the element, then filter checks the index, and finally to get rid of the resulting tuple I map it to just the element.

let evens = arrayOfValues.enumerate().filter({
                            (index: Int, element: Int) -> Bool in
                            return index % 2 == 0
                        }).map({ (_: Int, element: Int) -> Double in
                            return Double(element)
                        })
let odds = arrayOfValues.enumerate().filter({
                            (index: Int, element: Int) -> Bool in
                            return index % 2 != 0
                        }).map({ (_: Int, element: Int) -> Double in
                            return Double(element)
                        })

Starting with Swift 3, it is

for (index, element) in list.enumerated() {
  print("Item \(index): \(element)")
}

This is the Formula of loop of Enumeration:

for (index, value) in shoppingList.enumerate() {
print("Item \(index + 1): \(value)")
}

for more detail you can check Here.

You can simply use loop of enumeration to get your desired result:

Swift 2:

for (index, element) in elements.enumerate() {
    print("\(index): \(element)")
}

Swift 3 & 4:

for (index, element) in elements.enumerated() {
    print("\(index): \(element)")
}

Or you can simply go through a for loop to get the same result:

for index in 0..<elements.count {
    let element = elements[index]
    print("\(index): \(element)")
}

Hope it helps.

Using .enumerate() works, but it does not provide the true index of the element; it only provides an Int beginning with 0 and incrementing by 1 for each successive element. This is usually irrelevant, but there is the potential for unexpected behavior when used with the ArraySlice type. Take the following code:

let a = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e"]
a.indices //=> 0..<5

let aSlice = a[1..<4] //=> ArraySlice with ["b", "c", "d"]
aSlice.indices //=> 1..<4

var test = [Int: String]()
for (index, element) in aSlice.enumerate() {
    test[index] = element
}
test //=> [0: "b", 1: "c", 2: "d"] // indices presented as 0..<3, but they are actually 1..<4
test[0] == aSlice[0] // ERROR: out of bounds

It's a somewhat contrived example, and it's not a common issue in practice but still I think it's worth knowing this can happen.

  • 2
    it does not actually provide the true index of the element; it only provides an Int beginning with 0 and incrementing by 1 for each successive element Yes, that's why it's called enumerate. Also, slice is not array, so no surprise it behaves differently. There's no bug here - everything is by design. :) – Moritz May 30 '16 at 9:28
  • 3
    True, but I never called it a bug. It just is potentially unexpected behavior that I thought was worth mentioning for those who didn't know how it could interact negatively with the ArraySlice type. – Cole Campbell May 30 '16 at 20:22
  • Are you aware of any way to get the index of the actual element - for example if using filter first? – Alexandre Cassagne Aug 27 at 14:47

Xcode 8 and Swift 3: Array can be enumerated using tempArray.enumerate()

Example:

var someStrs = [String]()

someStrs.append("Apple")  
someStrs.append("Amazon")  
someStrs += ["Google"]    


for (index, item) in someStrs.enumerated()  
{  
        print("Value at index = \(index) is \(item)").  
}

console:

Value at index = 0 is Apple
Value at index = 1 is Amazon
Value at index = 2 is Google

For those who want to use forEach.

Swift 4

extension Array {
  func forEachWithIndex(_ body: (Int, Element) throws -> Void) rethrows {
    try zip((startIndex ..< endIndex), self).forEach(body)
  }
}

Or

array.enumerated().forEach { ... }

I personally prefer using the forEach method:

list.enumerated().forEach { (index, element) in
    ...
}

You can also use the short version:

list.enumerated().forEach { print("index: \($0.0), value: \($0.1)") }

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.