108

Is it possible to skip/exclude some tests from being run with go test?

I have a fairly large amount of integration type tests which call a rest service written as standard go tests, and run with go test. When a new feature is developed its sometimes useful to be able to skip some of the tests, for example if the new feature is not yet deployed on the testing server and I still want to run all the existing tests (except those new ones which tests the new feature).

I know about -run, but I dont want to specify all tests I want to run, that would be a long list. At the same time I have not been able to write a regex for excluding tests.

Another option would be to not commit the tests which dont run in the same branch, but it would be easier if I could just specify what to exclude.

5
  • You could specify the tests as either long or short and then run only the short ones unless all are required. golang.org/pkg/testing Jun 4, 2014 at 6:03
  • 1
    Thats one way to do it, but it means that I need to update the test code once the new feature is deployed on the testing server. Feels wrong to need to add specific code to handle if a feature is deployed or not
    – viblo
    Jun 4, 2014 at 6:09
  • split the tests into different _test files ?
    – fabmilo
    Jun 4, 2014 at 7:09
  • 1
    I dont understand how different _test files would help (but yes, I already have many _test files)? I would still need to list all the _test files except the one to exclude, right?
    – viblo
    Jun 4, 2014 at 8:43
  • 1
    Sometimes for integration tests I have it check for an environment variable; if set, it runs them. Otherwise it doesn't.
    – Matt
    Jun 4, 2014 at 12:39

4 Answers 4

171

Testing package has SkipNow() and Skip() methods. So, an individual test could be prepended with something like this:

func skipCI(t *testing.T) {
  if os.Getenv("CI") != "" {
    t.Skip("Skipping testing in CI environment")
  }
}

func TestNewFeature(t *testing.T) {
  skipCI(t)
}

You could then set the environment variable or run CI=true go test to set CI as a command-local variable.

Another approach would be to use short mode. Add the following guard to a test

if testing.Short() {
  t.Skip("skipping testing in short mode")
}

and then execute your tests with go test -short

3
  • 18
    This seems to be the better answer now.
    – A.A.
    Apr 22, 2019 at 16:31
  • Thanks for this one. Just want to update to cover more cases such as Benchmark (testing.B) func skipCI(t testing.TB) { //TB is interface of T and B if os.Getenv("CI") != "" { t.Skip("Skipping testing in CI environment") } } Jan 31, 2020 at 5:50
  • 2
    very helpful because in GitHub actions the environment variable CI is set to true by default: docs.github.com/en/actions/learn-github-actions/… May 21, 2022 at 22:20
74

Like VonC said, you can use +build tags

┌─ oneofone@Oa [/t/tst-tag]                                                                                                      
└──➜ ls
a_test.go  b_test.go  c_test.go

a_test.go :

package tags

import "testing"

func TestA(t *testing.T) {}

b_test.go :

// +build !feature1

package tags

import "testing"

func TestB(t *testing.T) {}

c_test.go :

// +build !feature1
// +build !feature2

package tags

import "testing"

func TestC(t *testing.T) {}

Then run the test with the -tags parameter :

┌─ oneofone@Oa [/t/tst-tag]                                                                                                      
└──➜ go test -v . | grep PASS:
--- PASS: TestA (0.00 seconds)
--- PASS: TestB (0.00 seconds)
--- PASS: TestC (0.00 seconds)
┌─ oneofone@Oa [/t/tst-tag]                                                                                                      
└──➜ go test -v -tags feature1 . | grep PASS:
--- PASS: TestA (0.00 seconds)
┌─ oneofone@Oa [/t/tst-tag]                                                                                                      
└──➜ go test -v -tags feature2 . | grep PASS:
--- PASS: TestA (0.00 seconds)
--- PASS: TestB (0.00 seconds)

// Update : different logic :

a_test.go:

// +build all

package tags

import "testing"

func TestA(t *testing.T) {}

b_test.go:

// +build all feature1

package tags

import "testing"

func TestB(t *testing.T) {}

c_test.go:

// +build all feature2

package tags

import "testing"

func TestC(t *testing.T) {}


┌─ oneofone@Oa [/t/tst-tag]                                                                                                      
└──➜ go test -v -tags all | grep PASS:
--- PASS: TestA (0.00 seconds)
--- PASS: TestB (0.00 seconds)
--- PASS: TestC (0.00 seconds)
┌─ oneofone@Oa [/t/tst-tag]                                                                                                      
└──➜ go test -v -tags feature1 | grep PASS:
--- PASS: TestB (0.00 seconds)
┌─ oneofone@Oa [/t/tst-tag]                                                                                                      
└──➜ go test -v -tags="feature1 feature2" | grep PASS:
--- PASS: TestB (0.00 seconds)
--- PASS: TestC (0.00 seconds)

Or you call specific tests by name like :

d_test.go:

package tags

import "testing"

func TestA1(t *testing.T) {}
func TestB1(t *testing.T) {}
func TestC1(t *testing.T) {}
func TestD1(t *testing.T) {}

Output:

┌─ oneofone@Oa [/t/tst-tag]                                                                                                      
└──➜ go test -run="(A|B)1" -v | grep PASS:
--- PASS: TestA1 (0.00 seconds)
--- PASS: TestB1 (0.00 seconds)
┌─ oneofone@Oa [/t/tst-tag]                                                                                                      
└──➜ go test -run="D1" -v | grep PASS:
--- PASS: TestD1 (0.00 seconds)
6
  • I haven't thought of using the build tags. Nice :)
    – fabmilo
    Jun 4, 2014 at 16:04
  • Oops I meant @VonC :)
    – OneOfOne
    Jun 4, 2014 at 18:12
  • 1
    Maybe I didnt explain it enough or I dont understand it. It feels like this solution is not scalable. Lets say I have 20 test files, each containing one feature. I add a new file with a new featureX. Now I have to add !featureX in every other file?
    – viblo
    Jun 5, 2014 at 6:04
  • 1
    Add // +build all to all files, and featureX to specific files next to the all tag, that way if you want to run everything you can do go test -v -tags all
    – OneOfOne
    Jun 5, 2014 at 12:02
  • Note that this won't work for Example style tests as godoc will not include them as it skips examples not in the default build. Jul 14, 2020 at 0:02
7

Supplement to the Vadym Tyemirov's answer.

You can use TestMain skip test in whole pkg when env CI not empty.

func TestMain(m *testing.M) {
    if os.Getenv("CI") == "" {
        m.Run()
    }
}
1
  • Or can run os.Exit(0) there as well.
    – Ben G
    Mar 21 at 18:33
5

The go 1.20 test command now accepts -skip to skip tests, subtests, or examples matching .

https://tip.golang.org/doc/go1.20

1
  • This is nice, except that it only matches the name of the test, not the filename. For example, it might skip more than I wanted when I do go test ./.... Apr 15, 2023 at 2:34

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