299

Is it possible in Swift? If not then is there a workaround to do it?

15 Answers 15

394

If you want to use optional methods, you must mark your protocol with @objc attribute:

@objc protocol MyProtocol {

    @objc optional func doSomething()

}

class MyClass : MyProtocol {

    // no error

}

Otherwise, Swift protocols behave like interfaces on other OO languages, where all methods defined in interfaces must be implemented.

  • 15
    Look at improved way of optional methods in swift using an extension (below) – Daniel Kanaan Nov 17 '15 at 19:05
  • 1
    And how does one test for support of an optional protocol method in an instance? respondsToSelector? – devios1 Jan 27 '16 at 21:35
  • 3
    Just don't do this! Swift does not support optional method in protocols for a reason. – fpg1503 Jun 22 '16 at 19:09
  • 2
    This method doesn't support optionals in parameters. I.e. you can't do that optional func doSomething(param: Int?) – SoftDesigner Nov 12 '16 at 10:20
  • 3
    Surely this answer is essentially wrong nowadays, years later. Today in Swift you simply add an extension for the default implementation, it's a basic aspect of Swift. (As all the modern answers below show.) It would be just wrong to add the objc flag, nowadays. – Fattie Jun 26 '17 at 10:54
362

In Swift 2 and onwards it's possible to add default implementations of a protocol. This creates a new way of optional methods in protocols.

protocol MyProtocol {
    func doSomethingNonOptionalMethod()
    func doSomethingOptionalMethod()
}

extension MyProtocol {
    func doSomethingOptionalMethod(){ 
        // leaving this empty 
    }
}

It's not a really nice way in creating optional protocol methods, but gives you the possibility to use structs in in protocol callbacks.

I wrote a small summary here: https://www.avanderlee.com/swift-2-0/optional-protocol-methods/

  • 2
    This is probably the cleanest way to do it in Swift. Too bad it does not work prior to Swift 2.0. – Entalpi Sep 3 '15 at 8:32
  • 11
    @MattQuiros I'm finding that you do in fact need to declare the function in the protocol definition, otherwise the no-op extension function doesn't get overridden in your classes that conform to the protocol. – Ian Pearce Sep 30 '15 at 18:13
  • 3
    @IanPearce is correct, and this appears to be by design. In the "Protocol Oriented Programming" talk (408) at WWDC, they talk about methods in the main protocol being "customization points" offered to conforming types. A required point of customization doesn't receive a definition in an extension; an optional point does. Methods on the protocol that generally should not be customized are wholly declared/defined in the extension to disallow conforming types to customize unless you specifically cast down to its dynamicType to show you want the conformer's custom implementation. – matthias Oct 1 '15 at 9:54
  • 1
    Good writeup of the subtlety in dynamic dispatch to protocol or implementing class here: nomothetis.svbtle.com/… – farhadf Oct 5 '15 at 23:42
  • 4
    @FranklinYu You can do this but then you are poluting your API design with 'throws' where it's in fact not needed. I like more the idea of "micro protocols". E.g. each method confirms to one protocol and then you can check for: if object is protocol – Darko Jun 9 '16 at 21:28
32

The other answers here involving marking the protocol as "@objc" do not work when using swift-specific types.

struct Info {
    var height: Int
    var weight: Int
} 

@objc protocol Health {
    func isInfoHealthy(info: Info) -> Bool
} 
//Error "Method cannot be marked @objc because the type of the parameter cannot be represented in Objective-C"

In order to declare optional protocols that work well with swift, declare the functions as variables instead of func's.

protocol Health {
    var isInfoHealthy: (Info) -> (Bool)? { get set }
}

And then implement the protocol as follows

class Human: Health {
    var isInfoHealthy: (Info) -> (Bool)? = { info in
        if info.weight < 200 && info.height > 72 {
            return true
        }
        return false
    }
    //Or leave out the implementation and declare it as:  
    //var isInfoHealthy: (Info) -> (Bool)?
}

You can then use "?" to check whether or not the function has been implemented

func returnEntity() -> Health {
    return Human()
}

var anEntity: Health = returnEntity()

var isHealthy = anEntity.isInfoHealthy(Info(height: 75, weight: 150))? 
//"isHealthy" is true
  • 3
    With this solution you can't access self from within any of the protocol functions. This may cause issues in some cases! – George Green Aug 20 '14 at 0:12
  • 1
    @GeorgeGreen You can access self. Mark the function variable as lazy and use a capture list inside the closure. – Zag Aug 21 '14 at 22:41
  • Only classes, protocols, methods and properties can use @objc. In case you are using an Enum parameter in the @ objc protocol method defination, you are doomed. – khunshan Oct 31 '14 at 11:54
  • 1
    @khunshan, this method requires nothing being marked @ objc, what are you referring to? – Zag Aug 20 '15 at 13:29
  • its an information on the topic that enums cannot be used in between swift and objc which the for other statements can be bridged with @objc keyword. – khunshan Aug 21 '15 at 5:36
30

In Swift 3.0

@objc protocol CounterDataSource {
    @objc optional func increment(forCount count: Int) -> Int
    @objc optional var fixedIncrement: Int { get }
}

It will save your time.

  • 6
    Any source of why @objc is needed on all members now? – DevAndArtist Jan 4 '17 at 20:12
  • @Gautam Sareriya: What do you think is best this approach or creating empty extension methods? – eonist Jan 15 '17 at 15:29
  • I tried with your methods with required flag, but with errors: required may only be used on 'init' declarations. – Ben Apr 26 '17 at 23:46
28

Here is a concrete example with the delegation pattern.

Setup your Protocol:

@objc protocol MyProtocol:class
{
    func requiredMethod()
    optional func optionalMethod()
}

class MyClass: NSObject
{
    weak var delegate:MyProtocol?

    func callDelegate()
    {
        delegate?.requiredMethod()
        delegate?.optionalMethod?()
    }
}

Set the delegate to a class and implement the Protocol. See that the optional method does not need to be implemented.

class AnotherClass: NSObject, MyProtocol
{
    init()
    {
        super.init()

        let myInstance = MyClass()
        myInstance.delegate = self
    }

    func requiredMethod()
    {
    }
}

One important thing is that the optional method is optional and needs a "?" when calling. Mention the second question mark.

delegate?.optionalMethod?()
  • 2
    This should be the correct answer. Simple, clean and explanatory. – Echelon Aug 11 '16 at 12:10
  • i agree, this answer is short, sweet and straight to the point. thanks! – LuAndre Nov 7 '16 at 2:39
26
  • You need to add optional keyword prior to each method.
  • Please note, however, that for this to work, your protocol must be marked with the @objc attribute.
  • This further implies that this protocol would be applicable to classes but not structures.
  • 8
    @downvoter: why the down vote? looks sound – Daij-Djan Jun 4 '14 at 9:00
  • Minor correction (too small to edit!) but it should be 'optional' not '@optional' – Ali Beadle May 8 '15 at 15:38
  • 4
    This also requires you to mark your class implementing the protocol as @objc, not just the protocol. – Johnathon Sullinger Jul 6 '15 at 19:32
24

Since there are some answers about how to use optional modifier and @objc attribute to define optional requirement protocol, I will give a sample about how to use protocol extensions define optional protocol.

Below code is Swift 3.*.

/// Protocol has empty default implementation of the following methods making them optional to implement:
/// `cancel()`
protocol Cancelable {

    /// default implementation is empty.
    func cancel()
}

extension Cancelable {

    func cancel() {}
}

class Plane: Cancelable {
  //Since cancel() have default implementation, that is optional to class Plane
}

let plane = Plane()
plane.cancel()
// Print out *United Airlines can't cancelable*

Please notice protocol extension methods can't invoked by Objective-C code, and worse is Swift team won't fix it. https://bugs.swift.org/browse/SR-492

  • 1
    Good job! This should be the correct answer since it solves the problem without getting Objective-C runtime involved. – Lukas Jul 17 '17 at 8:37
  • This is much more Swifty than the accepted answer. – picciano Aug 30 '17 at 15:03
  • really nice one ! – tania_S Dec 13 '17 at 10:41
10

A pure Swift approach with protocol inheritance:

//Required methods
protocol MyProtocol {
    func foo()
}

//Optional methods
protocol MyExtendedProtocol: MyProtocol {
    func bar()
}

class MyClass {
    var delegate: MyProtocol
    func myMethod() {
        (delegate as? MyExtendedProtocol).bar()
    }
}
9

To illustrate the mechanics of Antoine's answer:

protocol SomeProtocol {
    func aMethod()
}

extension SomeProtocol {
    func aMethod() {
        print("extensionImplementation")
    }
}

class protocolImplementingObject: SomeProtocol {

}

class protocolImplementingMethodOverridingObject: SomeProtocol {
    func aMethod() {
        print("classImplementation")
    }
}

let noOverride = protocolImplementingObject()
let override = protocolImplementingMethodOverridingObject()

noOverride.aMethod() //prints "extensionImplementation"
override.aMethod() //prints "classImplementation"
6

Slightly off topic from the original question, but it builds off Antoine’s idea and I thought it might help someone.

You can also make computed properties optional for structs with protocol extensions.

You can make a property on the protocol optional

protocol SomeProtocol {
    var required: String { get }
    var optional: String? { get }
}

Implement the dummy computed property in the protocol extension

extension SomeProtocol {
    var optional: String? { return nil }
}

And now you can use structs that do or don’t have the optional property implemented

struct ConformsWithoutOptional {
    let required: String
}

struct ConformsWithOptional {
    let required: String
    let optional: String?
}

I’ve also written up how to do optional properties in Swift protocols on my blog, which I’ll keep updated in case things change through the Swift 2 releases.

6

I think that before asking how you can implement an optional protocol method, you should be asking why you should implement one.

If we think of swift protocols as an Interface in classic object oriented programming, optional methods do not make much sense, and perhaps a better solution would be to create default implementation, or separate the protocol into a set of protocols (perhaps with some inheritance relations between them) to represent the possible combination of methods in the protocol.

For further reading, see https://useyourloaf.com/blog/swift-optional-protocol-methods/, which gives an excellent overview on this matter.

3

Here's a very simple example for swift Classes ONLY, and not for structures or enumerations. Note that the protocol method being optional, has two levels of optional chaining at play. Also the class adopting the protocol needs the @objc attribute in its declaration.

@objc protocol CollectionOfDataDelegate{
   optional func indexDidChange(index: Int)
}


@objc class RootView: CollectionOfDataDelegate{

    var data = CollectionOfData()

   init(){
      data.delegate = self
      data.indexIsNow()
   }

  func indexDidChange(index: Int) {
      println("The index is currently: \(index)")
  }

}

class CollectionOfData{
    var index : Int?
    weak var delegate : CollectionOfDataDelegate?

   func indexIsNow(){
      index = 23
      delegate?.indexDidChange?(index!)
    }

 }
  • Can you describe a little more the "two levels of optional at play" part, namely this: delegate?.indexDidChange?(index!)? – Unheilig Mar 5 '15 at 20:40
  • 2
    If we had written the protocol to have a non optional method like this: protocol CollectionOfDataDelegate{ func indexDidChange(index: Int) } then you would call it without the question mark: delegate?.indexDidChange(index!) When you set a optional requirement for a method in a protocol, the Type that will conform to it might NOT implement that method, so the ? is used to check for the implementation and If there is none the program will not crash. @Unheilig – Blessing Lopes Mar 6 '15 at 18:43
  • weak var delegate : CollectionOfDataDelegate? (ensure weak reference?) – Alfie Hanssen Jun 24 '15 at 17:05
  • @AlfieHanssen yes, good idea! :) – Blessing Lopes Jun 25 '15 at 23:29
  • @BlessingLopes Can you add your explanation of the delegate? usage to your answer? That information should really belong in there for others in the future. I want to upvote this, but that information should really be in the answer. – Johnathon Sullinger Jul 6 '15 at 19:29
3

if you want to do it in pure swift the best way is to provide a default implementation particullary if you return a Swift type like for example struct with Swift types

example :

struct magicDatas {
    var damagePoints : Int?
    var manaPoints : Int?
}

protocol magicCastDelegate {
    func castFire() -> magicDatas
    func castIce() -> magicDatas
}

extension magicCastDelegate {
    func castFire() -> magicDatas {
        return magicDatas()
    }

    func castIce() -> magicDatas {
        return magicDatas()
    }
}

then you can implement protocol without defines every func

-1

To define Optional Protocol in swift you should use @objc keyword before Protocol declaration and attribute/method declaration inside that protocol. Below is a sample of Optional Property of a protocol.

@objc protocol Protocol {

  @objc optional var name:String?

}

class MyClass: Protocol {

   // No error

}
-16

Put the @optional in front of methods or properties.

  • Compiler Error: 'optional' attribute can only be applied to members of an @objc protocol. – Selvin Jun 4 '14 at 8:50
  • 2
    @optional isn't even the correct keyword. It's optional, and you must declare the class and protocol wit the @objc attribute. – Johnathon Sullinger Jul 6 '15 at 19:34

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