20

I want to tell the user that a record was not deleted because it has child data, but how can I be sure that the exception was thrown because of a foreign key violation? I see that there a sqlexception class that is used for all sql exception.

44

Assume you're using SQL Server.

Using teh Googles - http://blogs.msdn.com/tomholl/archive/2007/08/01/mapping-sql-server-errors-to-net-exceptions-the-fun-way.aspx

try
{
    # SQL Stuff
}
catch (SqlException ex)
{
    if (ex.Errors.Count > 0) // Assume the interesting stuff is in the first error
    {
        switch (ex.Errors[0].Number)
        {
            case 547: // Foreign Key violation
                throw new InvalidOperationException("Some helpful description", ex);
                break;
            case 2601: // Primary key violation
                throw new DuplicateRecordException("Some other helpful description", ex);
                break;
            default:
                throw new DataAccessException(ex);
        }
    }

}

Case 547 is your man.

UPDATE The above is sample code and should not be used. Please follow the link as to explain why.

  • 2
    If you follow the link, and read down, you'll notice that the code above is given as an example of how not to do it... – bornfromanegg Sep 23 '14 at 8:21
  • Absolutely correct - I had only intended to have this code here to show an expanded version of the error catching. I suppose I should put a notice not to use (since that's the issue with the other page). – aronchick Sep 29 '14 at 4:36
  • @aronchick why do you set the if condition if (ex.Errors.Count > 0) ? why it is useful ? – sam Sep 29 '18 at 14:32
  • Just to see if there's any errors (there could be more than one). – aronchick Nov 5 '18 at 23:17
-2

You can write your exception-expected code in the Try block if any exception will be thrown it will be catch further now you can get error number.now can check is it a Foreign Key violation or not

try
 {

//your deletetion code

 }catch (SqlException ex)
    {

        if (ex.Errors.Count > 0) // Assume the interesting stuff is in the first error
        {
            switch (ex.Errors[0].Number)
            {
                case 547: // Foreign Key violation
                    lblError.Text = "Cannot Delete this Record this is associated with other record...!";

                    break;
                default:
                  throw;

            }
        }
    }
  • 1
    Please do not repeat other answers – Jan Doggen Apr 30 '16 at 11:19

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