111

I've so far got a simple (but potentially expensive) way:

var myMax = sort(myArray,>)[0]

And how I was taught to do it at school:

var myMax = 0
for i in 0..myArray.count {
    if (myArray[i] > myMax){myMax = myArray[i]}
}

Is there a better way to get the maximum value from an integer Array in Swift? Ideally something that's one line such as Ruby's .max

  • You write an extension. – gnasher729 Jun 4 '14 at 11:48
  • Yes, one line: maxElement(myArray). See what's currently the second answer (Rudolf Adamkovic's) below. – leekaiinthesky May 14 '15 at 3:15
  • Yo change that accepted answer to this – mattgabor Aug 20 '15 at 20:27
  • @mattymcgee I have updated the accepted answer. – Charlie Egan Aug 20 '15 at 20:29

12 Answers 12

270

Given:

let numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

Swift 3:

numbers.min() // equals 1
numbers.max() // equals 5

Swift 2:

numbers.minElement() // equals 1
numbers.maxElement() // equals 5
  • 2
    Works only on Comparable objects, so NSDecimalNumber won't work for example. – Michał Hernas Feb 3 '15 at 13:48
  • 2
    Is it just me or do these functions not exist in Swift 2? – Liron Yahdav Sep 25 '15 at 3:54
  • @LironYahdav They're now methods. Fixed. Thanks! – Rudolf Adamkovič Sep 27 '15 at 9:58
  • 2
    Yes...!!!! Its working till date.. Even on Xcode 7, Swift 2.1..Thanks – onCompletion Mar 1 '16 at 7:58
  • 2
    Note in Swift 3 these have been renamed to simply min() and max(). – jemmons Jul 10 '16 at 14:55
91

Update: This should probably be the accepted answer since maxElement appeared in Swift.


Use the almighty reduce:

let nums = [1, 6, 3, 9, 4, 6];
let numMax = nums.reduce(Int.min, { max($0, $1) })

Similarly:

let numMin = nums.reduce(Int.max, { min($0, $1) })

reduce takes a first value that is the initial value for an internal accumulator variable, then applies the passed function (here, it's anonymous) to the accumulator and each element of the array successively, and stores the new value in the accumulator. The last accumulator value is then returned.

  • 1
    Perfect, just what I was looking for. There's a lot that's not in the iBook it seems! – Charlie Egan Jun 4 '14 at 12:01
  • 2
    Those are just general functional programming techniques, they're not specific to Swift. – Jean-Philippe Pellet Jun 4 '14 at 12:02
  • 10
    @Jean-PhilippePellet you can actually simplify this to just: nums.reduce(Int.min, max) since max's prototype already matches the type that reduce is expecting – drewag Aug 5 '14 at 23:12
  • is there a reason why this does not work with arrays of doubles? – Nicholas Nov 8 '14 at 10:20
  • 2
    The min/max function signatures match the combine: parameter signature so you can just pass the function itself: let numMax = nums.reduce(Int.min, combine: max) – Leslie Godwin Oct 31 '15 at 4:35
34

With Swift 5, Array, like other Sequence Protocol conforming objects (Dictionary, Set, etc), has two methods called max() and max(by:) that return the maximum element in the sequence or nil if the sequence is empty.


#1. Using Array's max() method

If the element type inside your sequence conforms to Comparable protocol (may it be String, Float, Character or one of your custom class or struct), you will be able to use max() that has the following declaration:

@warn_unqualified_access func max() -> Element?

Returns the maximum element in the sequence.

The following Playground codes show to use max():

let intMax = [12, 15, 6].max()
let stringMax = ["bike", "car", "boat"].max()

print(String(describing: intMax)) // prints: Optional(15)
print(String(describing: stringMax)) // prints: Optional("car")
class Route: Comparable, CustomStringConvertible {

    let distance: Int
    var description: String { return "Route with distance: \(distance)" }

    init(distance: Int) {
        self.distance = distance
    }

    static func ==(lhs: Route, rhs: Route) -> Bool {
        return lhs.distance == rhs.distance
    }

    static func <(lhs: Route, rhs: Route) -> Bool {
        return lhs.distance < rhs.distance
    }

}

let routes = [
    Route(distance: 20),
    Route(distance: 30),
    Route(distance: 10)
]

let maxRoute = routes.max()
print(String(describing: maxRoute)) // prints: Optional(Route with distance: 30)

#2. Using Array's max(by:) method

If the element type inside your sequence does not conform to Comparable protocol, you will have to use max(by:) that has the following declaration:

@warn_unqualified_access func max(by areInIncreasingOrder: (Element, Element) throws -> Bool) rethrows -> Element?

Returns the maximum element in the sequence, using the given predicate as the comparison between elements.

The following Playground codes show to use max(by:):

let dictionary = ["Boat" : 15, "Car" : 20, "Bike" : 40]

let keyMaxElement = dictionary.max(by: { (a, b) -> Bool in
    return a.key < b.key
})

let valueMaxElement = dictionary.max(by: { (a, b) -> Bool in
    return a.value < b.value
})

print(String(describing: keyMaxElement)) // prints: Optional(("Car", 20))
print(String(describing: valueMaxElement)) // prints: Optional(("Bike", 40))
class Route: CustomStringConvertible {

    let distance: Int
    var description: String { return "Route with distance: \(distance)" }

    init(distance: Int) {
        self.distance = distance
    }

}

let routes = [
    Route(distance: 20),
    Route(distance: 30),
    Route(distance: 10)
]

let maxRoute = routes.max(by: { (a, b) -> Bool in
    return a.distance < b.distance
})

print(String(describing: maxRoute)) // prints: Optional(Route with distance: 30)
  • In Swift 3 "maxElement" has been renamed to "max" – Nicolai Henriksen Aug 24 '17 at 6:34
15

The other answers are all correct, but don't forget you could also use collection operators, as follows:

var list = [1, 2, 3, 4]
var max: Int = (list as AnyObject).valueForKeyPath("@max.self") as Int

you can also find the average in the same way:

var avg: Double = (list as AnyObject).valueForKeyPath("@avg.self") as Double

This syntax might be less clear than some of the other solutions, but it's interesting to see that -valueForKeyPath: can still be used :)

  • Cool, I'll keep this in mind. Thanks. – Charlie Egan Jun 4 '14 at 16:10
9

You can use with reduce:

let randomNumbers = [4, 7, 1, 9, 6, 5, 6, 9]
let maxNumber = randomNumbers.reduce(randomNumbers[0]) { $0 > $1 ? $0 : $1 } //result is 9
3

With Swift 1.2 (and maybe earlier) you now need to use:

let nums = [1, 6, 3, 9, 4, 6];
let numMax = nums.reduce(Int.min, combine: { max($0, $1) })

For working with Double values I used something like this:

let nums = [1.3, 6.2, 3.6, 9.7, 4.9, 6.3];
let numMax = nums.reduce(-Double.infinity, combine: { max($0, $1) })
  • 1
    You could also just do this let numMax = nums.reduce(-Double.infinity, combine: max), the max function signature matches the combine: parameter signature. – Leslie Godwin Oct 31 '15 at 4:29
2
var numbers = [1, 2, 7, 5];    
var val = sort(numbers){$0 > $1}[0];
  • 2
    To me this looks much like var myMax = sort(myArray,>)[0] – Charlie Egan Jun 4 '14 at 12:07
  • 2
    Sort has too much overhead. – vy32 Feb 16 '15 at 19:28
  • Bad in term of performance – Trung Phan Apr 20 '17 at 2:30
2

In Swift 2.0, the minElement and maxElement become methods of SequenceType protocol, you should call them like:

let a = [1, 2, 3]
print(a.maxElement()) //3
print(a.minElement()) //1

Using maxElement as a function like maxElement(a) is unavailable now.

The syntax of Swift is in flux, so I can just confirm this in Xcode version7 beta6.

It may be modified in the future, so I suggest that you'd better check the doc before you use these methods.

0

Swift 3.0

You can try this code programmatically.

func getSmallAndGreatestNumber() -> Void {

    let numbers = [145, 206, 116, 809, 540, 176]
    var i = 0
    var largest = numbers[0]
    var small = numbers[0]
    while i < numbers.count{

        if (numbers[i] > largest) {
            largest = numbers[i]
        }
        if (numbers[i] < small) {
            small = numbers[i]
        }
        i = i + 1
    }
    print("Maximum Number ====================\(largest)")// 809
    print("Minimum Number ====================\(small)")// 116
}
0

Updated for Swift 3/4:

Use below simple lines of code to find the max from array;

var num = [11, 2, 7, 5, 21]
var result = num.sorted(){
    $0 > $1
}
print("max from result: \(result[0])") // 21
0

Here's a performance test for the solutions posted here. https://github.com/tedgonzalez/MaxElementInCollectionPerformance

This is the fastest for Swift 5

array.max()

-1

You can also sort your array and then use array.first or array.last

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