1

I'm sorting an array like this:

NSArray *temp = [array sortedArrayUsingComparator:^NSComparisonResult(id a, id b) {
    int first = [[a valueForKey:@"id"] intValue];
    int second = [[b valueForKey:@"id"]intValue];
    if (first > second) return NSOrderedAscending;
    if (first < second) return NSOrderedDescending;
    return NSOrderedSame;
}];
return [temp mutableCopy];

Works perfectly but now I want to add a check to see if, for example, a's value for key is equal to a certain value, always keep it at the top of the array, no matter what the "id" value is. Is it possible to do this using the comparator?

  • 3
    You pretty much described how to do it in your question! – CrimsonChris Jun 4 '14 at 15:34
  • I know I answered how it should be written but I wasn't sure the syntax for it. – denikov Jun 4 '14 at 15:59
3

Lets assume your certain value is 5, then change code as

NSArray *temp = [array sortedArrayUsingComparator:^NSComparisonResult(id a, id b) {
    int first = [[a valueForKey:@"id"] intValue];
    int second = [[b valueForKey:@"id"] intValue];
    int foo = [[a valueForKey:@"foo"] intValue]; // get foo

    if (foo == 5) return NSOrderedAscending;    // send foo to the top/bottom
    if (first > second) return NSOrderedAscending;
    if (first < second) return NSOrderedDescending;
    return NSOrderedSame;
}];
return [temp mutableCopy];
  • The thing is I'm not comparing the id value...I'm comparing another KV. I want to check if 'a valueForKey:"foo"' then always keep it at the top – denikov Jun 4 '14 at 16:00
  • Then use the other value. What's confusing you? – CrimsonChris Jun 4 '14 at 16:03
  • Look at it now (I changed the code), I guess you are stuck in something otherwise its very simple problem. – Zee Jun 4 '14 at 16:05
  • Ok that works. I'm not that confident with comparators and how they "magically" sort (does NSOrderedDescending just send the value down one? or does it loop the entire array downwards?). So I was confused on the syntax. Thanks for the help tho – denikov Jun 4 '14 at 16:08
1
NSArray *temp = [array sortedArrayUsingComparator:^NSComparisonResult(id a, id b) {
    int first = [[a valueForKey:@"id"] intValue];
    int second = [[b valueForKey:@"id"]intValue];
    if (first > second || (yourOverridingConditionGoesHere)) return NSOrderedAscending;
    if (first < second) return NSOrderedDescending;
    return NSOrderedSame;
}];
return [temp mutableCopy];
1

You are free to write whatever code you want in your comparator function. Zee's code should solve your problem for you.

Note that you might want to avoid using key-value coding ("valueForKey") if possible, since it's slower than other methods of fetching a value. If the objects in your array are dictionaries, use objectForKey. If the array contains custom objects with properties that you use for sorting, then just reference the property directly. In both cases you'll have to cast the object to the appropriate type, but that's trivial, e.g.:

^NSComparisonResult(NSDictionary *a, NSDictionary *b) {
    int first = [a[@"id] intValue];
    int second = [b[@"id] intValue];

    int foo = [a[@"foo"] intValue]; // get foo
    if (foo == 5) return NSOrderedAscending;    // send foo to the top/bottom
    if (first < second) return NSOrderedDescending;
    if (first > second) return NSOrderedAscending;
    return NSOrderedSame;
}
##How comparator based sorting works:##

You send an array a sortedArrayUsingComparator message, along with a comparator block that knows how to compare 2 items in the array.

The sort method then runs through all the objects in your array, invoking your code to compare pairs of objets and decide what order they belong in. The sort method is free to use whatever sort algorithm is best for the current situation (number of items, type of private concrete array subclass that is being used, etc.) If the sort method decides to use quick sort, or heap sort, or even a bubble sort, you don't need to care. Since your comparator tells it how to compare a pair of objects, it can create a sorted array for you.

  • Thanks for the explanation of how it works. It's clearer to me now. But why do you have two "first < second"? – denikov Jun 4 '14 at 18:41
  • 1
    That was a typo that I copied from the previous poster. I'll go back and fix it. – Duncan C Jun 4 '14 at 19:34
  • Duncan, I returned to this question and I have a "quirk" I want to throw in, if it's possible. So I want to order by "id" BUT...what if I want to keep a certain KEY always at the top of the list? Is this possible using this Comparator? The KV pair isn't an id, for example, it's just some string... – denikov Jun 20 '14 at 14:39
  • I guess you could write your comparator so that the "magic" key always compares to anything as going first. – Duncan C Jun 20 '14 at 16:15

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