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How does forever monad work?

forever :: (Monad m) => m a -> m b
forever a = a >> forever a

If I write

main = forever $ putStrLn "SAD, I DON'T UNDERSTAND!"

forever gets IO (), this isn't function, how can forever repeatedly call putStrLn?

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  • main isn't a function, either. Functions don't do IO in haskell, IO actions do.
    – Carl
    Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 16:46
  • IO is simple Monad, advanced applicative
    – dev1223
    Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 16:50
  • 14
    forever is not a monad. Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 17:05
  • yes, you are right, it works with monads
    – dev1223
    Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 17:05

2 Answers 2

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From the definition of forever function, you can see that it is a standard recursive function.

forever :: (Monad m) => m a -> m b
forever a = a >> forever a

There is no magic going on there. forever is just a recursive function. In your particular case, this is a non terminating one. But whether it becomes a terminating or non terminating depends on how the Monad is defined for that type.

Inspect the type of >>, we get:

λ> :t (>>)
(>>) :: Monad m => m a -> m b -> m b

From that you can observe the input m a is just ignored. Another way to think about that is that >> function just performs the side effect of the first parameter passed to it. In your case the m a will correspond to IO () since that is the type of putStrLn.

Since IO forms a Monad, forever function can also act on IO related functions.

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  • forever is a recursive function, and it igore the value or action on the left of >> and call the right part(forever a ) to continue...
    – wshcdr
    Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 17:17
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    @wshcdr It ignores the resultant value but executes the side effects.
    – Sibi
    Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 17:19
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    forever is recursive, but it's only non-terminating for some monadic values. For example, forever Nothing quickly evaluates to Nothing.
    – amalloy
    Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 22:25
  • @amalloy Thanks, updated. It certainly depends on how you define the Monad instance for your type.
    – Sibi
    Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 23:37
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The distinction to make is that putStrLn "SAD, I DON'T UNDERSTAND!" is an action, not just a value. It repeatedly executes that action. Whenever something of type IO a is evaluated, it executes its internal actions and then returns something of type a wrapped in the IO context. It doesn't have to take a parameter for the action to do something. For example, look at the getCurrentTime function from the time package. It just has type IO UTCTime, but if you call it several times you'll get different values back, even though it takes no parameters.

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  • 1
    That isn't a tuple, it's a type usually called unit, that has a single value (). Think of it as null or none. It's still a value in haskell, just not one you can do much with.
    – bheklilr
    Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 17:03
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    The type IO () indicates that it has some side effects and has no meaningful return value. It's still a value, but that value can only be (), so there isn't much you can do with it. There isn't anything special about it, though, it's the same as data Void = Void, but with a different name. You can still do things like x <- putStrLn "hello", in which case x had type () and it's value is (). Since it can't be anything else, it isn't useful to extract that value, but it's definitely possible.
    – bheklilr
    Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 17:31
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    @Seraph, monads evaluation is implicit and is implemented in instantiation of Monad typeclass for the corresponding monad. In particular, IO () can be read as "side-effecting action which returns nothing". The actual value it "returns" is unimportant; side effects here are what matter. Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 17:32
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    @Seraph Correct, functions have arguments, but myaction does not. It performs a side effect, but it doesn't take any arguments in order to perform that side effect.
    – bheklilr
    Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 18:12
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    @Seraph Correct. main is the "ultimate" action, the entire behavior of the program occur inside the definition of main. If it isn't used by main (directly) or isn't used by one of the sub-expressions of main (indirectly), it isn't executed.
    – bheklilr
    Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 18:23

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