271

I've searched the Swift book, but can't find the Swift version of @synchronized. How do I do mutual exclusion in Swift?

2
  • 1
    I would use a dispatch barrier. Barriers provide very cheap synchronization. dispatch_barrier_async(). etc. Commented Aug 7, 2015 at 18:10
  • @FrederickC.Lee, what if you need a write to be synchronized though, such as when creating a wrapper for removeFirst()? Commented Jun 26, 2018 at 15:49

24 Answers 24

202

You can use GCD. It is a little more verbose than @synchronized, but works as a replacement:

let serialQueue = DispatchQueue(label: "com.test.mySerialQueue")
serialQueue.sync {
    // code
}
17
  • 12
    This is great, but there lacks the re-entry ability that you have with @synchronized. Commented Oct 23, 2014 at 16:46
  • 10
    With this approach you need to be careful. Your block might be executed on some other thread. API docs say: "As an optimization, this function invokes the block on the current thread when possible."
    – bio
    Commented Sep 24, 2015 at 17:57
  • 23
    Great article from Matt Gallagher about this: cocoawithlove.com/blog/2016/06/02/threads-and-mutexes.html
    – wuf810
    Commented Jul 29, 2016 at 11:50
  • 83
    No, no and no. Nice try, but works imperfectly well. Why? Essential reading (comprehensive comparison of alternatives, cautions) and a great utility framework from Matt Gallagher, here: cocoawithlove.com/blog/2016/06/02/threads-and-mutexes.html @wuf810 mentioned this first (HT), but understated how good this articles is. All should read. (Please upvote this by the minimum to make it initially visible, but no more.)
    – t0rst
    Commented Nov 24, 2016 at 10:13
  • 5
    Can someone clarify why this answer could cause deadlocks? Matt Gallagher's article makes it clear why this will be slower than @synchronized was, but why would it cause deadlocks? @TomKraina @bio @t0rst
    – Bill
    Commented Nov 30, 2019 at 12:36
193

I was looking for this myself and came to the conclusion there's no native construct inside of swift for this yet.

I did make up this small helper function based on some of the code I've seen from Matt Bridges and others.

func synced(_ lock: Any, closure: () -> ()) {
    objc_sync_enter(lock)
    closure()
    objc_sync_exit(lock)
}

Usage is pretty straight forward

synced(self) {
    println("This is a synchronized closure")
}

There is one problem I've found with this. Passing in an array as the lock argument seems to cause a very obtuse compiler error at this point. Otherwise though it seems to work as desired.

Bitcast requires both operands to be pointer or neither
  %26 = bitcast i64 %25 to %objc_object*, !dbg !378
LLVM ERROR: Broken function found, compilation aborted!
11
  • 17
    This is pretty useful and preserves the syntax of the @synchronized block nicely, but note that it is not identical to a real builtin block statement like the @synchronized block in Objective-C, because return and break statements no longer work to jump out of the surrounding function/loop like it would if this were an ordinary statement.
    – newacct
    Commented Oct 11, 2014 at 5:11
  • 3
    Error is likely due to that arrays are passed as values not references Commented Feb 16, 2015 at 9:52
  • 13
    This would probably be a great place to use the new defer keyword to ensure objc_sync_exit gets called even if closure throws.
    – devios1
    Commented Apr 18, 2016 at 19:26
  • 5
    @t0rst Calling this answer "flawed" based on the linked-to article is not valid. The article says this method is "a little slower than ideal" and "is limited to Apple platforms". That doesn't make it "flawed" by a long shot.
    – RenniePet
    Commented Dec 12, 2016 at 16:57
  • 2
    This very interesting article explains a pitfall with objc_sync_xxx: straypixels.net/swift-dictionary-locking Commented Apr 30, 2019 at 18:17
167

I like and use many of the answers here, so I'd choose whichever works best for you. That said, the method I prefer when I need something like objective-c's @synchronized uses the defer statement introduced in swift 2.

{ 
    objc_sync_enter(lock)
    defer { objc_sync_exit(lock) }

    //
    // code of critical section goes here
    //

} // <-- lock released when this block is exited

The nice thing about this method, is that your critical section can exit the containing block in any fashion desired (e.g., return, break, continue, throw), and "the statements within the defer statement are executed no matter how program control is transferred."1

8
  • 1
    I think this is probably the most elegant solution provided here. Thanks for your feedback.
    – Scott D
    Commented Jun 2, 2016 at 14:24
  • 3
    What is lock? How is lock initialized? Commented Aug 8, 2016 at 4:45
  • 7
    lock is any objective-c object. Commented Aug 8, 2016 at 17:04
  • 2
    Excellent! I had written some lock helper methods when Swift 1 was introduced and hadn't revisited these in a while. Completely forgot about defer; this is the way to go!
    – Randy
    Commented Sep 17, 2016 at 14:33
  • 2
    Great answer. It would help to say that one can use do { ... } to define a block of code, so do { obj_sync_enter(lock); defer { obj_sync_exit(lock); }; ...code... } achieves the same of @synchronized{ ...code... } Commented Dec 31, 2020 at 14:51
89

You can sandwich statements between objc_sync_enter(obj: AnyObject?) and objc_sync_exit(obj: AnyObject?). The @synchronized keyword is using those methods under the covers. i.e.

objc_sync_enter(self)
... synchronized code ...
objc_sync_exit(self)
4
  • 3
    Will this be considered use of a private API by Apple?
    – Drux
    Commented Jan 27, 2015 at 16:20
  • 2
    No, objc_sync_enter and objc_sync_exit are methods defined in Objc-sync.h and are open source: opensource.apple.com/source/objc4/objc4-371.2/runtime/…
    – bontoJR
    Commented Aug 5, 2015 at 11:48
  • What happens if multiple threads try to access the same resource, does the second one wait, retry, or crash?
    – TruMan1
    Commented Apr 26, 2016 at 20:39
  • Adding onto what @bontoJR said, objc_sync_enter(…) & objc_sync_exit(…) are public headers provided by the iOS/macOS/etc. APIs (looks like they're inside the ….sdk at the path usr/include/objc/objc-sync.h). The easiest way to find out if something is a public API or not is to (in Xcode) type the function name (e.g. objc_sync_enter(); arguments don't need to be specified for C functions), then try to command-click it. If it shows you the header file for that API, then you're good (since you wouldn't be able to see the header if it weren't public). Commented Jul 26, 2018 at 9:19
79

Analog of the @synchronized directive from Objective-C can have an arbitrary return type and nice rethrows behaviour in Swift.

// Swift 3
func synchronized<T>(_ lock: AnyObject, _ body: () throws -> T) rethrows -> T {
    objc_sync_enter(lock)
    defer { objc_sync_exit(lock) }
    return try body()
}

The use of the defer statement lets directly return a value without introducing a temporary variable.


In Swift 2 add the @noescape attribute to the closure to allow more optimisations:

// Swift 2
func synchronized<T>(lock: AnyObject, @noescape _ body: () throws -> T) rethrows -> T {
    objc_sync_enter(lock)
    defer { objc_sync_exit(lock) }
    return try body()
}

Based on the answers from GNewc [1] (where I like arbitrary return type) and Tod Cunningham [2] (where I like defer).

4
  • Xcode is telling me that @noescape is now default and is deprecated in Swift 3.
    – RenniePet
    Commented Dec 12, 2016 at 20:11
  • That's right, the code in this answer is for Swift 2 and requires some adaptation for Swift 3. I'll update it when I have time to.
    – werediver
    Commented Dec 12, 2016 at 20:56
  • 1
    Can you explain the usage? Maybe with an example.. thanks in advance! In my case, I have a Set that I need to synchronize, because I manipulate its content in a DispatchQueue.
    – sancho
    Commented Jun 30, 2017 at 21:21
  • @sancho I'd prefer to keep this post concise. You seem to ask about general concurrent programming guidelines, that's a broad question. Try to ask it as a separate question!
    – werediver
    Commented Jul 1, 2017 at 10:16
44

SWIFT 4

In Swift 4 you can use GCDs dispatch queues to lock resources.

class MyObject {
    private var internalState: Int = 0
    private let internalQueue: DispatchQueue = DispatchQueue(label:"LockingQueue") // Serial by default

    var state: Int {
        get {
            return internalQueue.sync { internalState }
        }

        set (newState) {
            internalQueue.sync { internalState = newState }
        }
    }
} 
4
  • This doesn't seem to work with XCode8.1. .serial seems to be unavailable. But .concurrent is available. :/ Commented Oct 26, 2016 at 16:19
  • 2
    the default is .serial Commented Nov 1, 2016 at 9:38
  • 2
    Note that this pattern does not guard properly against most common multi thread issues. For example, if you'd run myObject.state = myObject.state + 1 concurrently, it would not count the total operations but instead yield a nondeterministic value. To solve that problem, the calling code should be wrapped in a serial queue so that both the read and the write happen atomically. Of course Obj-c's @synchronised has the same problem, so in that sense your implementation is correct.
    – Berik
    Commented Jul 26, 2018 at 16:12
  • 1
    Yes, myObject.state += 1 is a combination of a read and then a write operation. Some other thread can still come inbetween to set/write a value. As per objc.io/blog/2018/12/18/atomic-variables, it would be easier to run the set in a sync block/closure instead and not under the variable itself.
    – CyberMew
    Commented Sep 18, 2019 at 10:17
30

In modern Swift 5, with return capability:

/**
Makes sure no other thread reenters the closure before the one running has not returned
*/
@discardableResult
public func synchronized<T>(_ lock: AnyObject, closure:() -> T) -> T {
    objc_sync_enter(lock)
    defer { objc_sync_exit(lock) }

    return closure()
}

Use it like this, to take advantage the return value capability:

let returnedValue = synchronized(self) { 
     // Your code here
     return yourCode()
}

Or like that otherwise:

synchronized(self) { 
     // Your code here
    yourCode()
}
2
  • 3
    This is the correct answer and not the accepted and highly upvoted one (which depends on GCD). It seems essentially noone uses or understands how to use Thread. I am v happy with it - whereas GCD is fraught with gotchas and limitations. Commented May 20, 2020 at 21:37
  • 1
    The correct answer needs to use a recursive lock, as does objc_sync_enter. I prefer to hide the lock parameter in a private let or iVar instead of using self, unless it needs to be published to allow others to sync too. That is a very rare case, but if that happens the use of objc_sync_enter permits cooperation between swift and objective-C. This answer also permits returning a value. For these reasons I have chosen this answer for use in my projects.
    – Rik Renich
    Commented Oct 15, 2020 at 13:20
23

To add return functionalty, you could do this:

func synchronize<T>(lockObj: AnyObject!, closure: ()->T) -> T
{
  objc_sync_enter(lockObj)
  var retVal: T = closure()
  objc_sync_exit(lockObj)
  return retVal
}

Subsequently, you can call it using:

func importantMethod(...) -> Bool {
  return synchronize(self) {
    if(feelLikeReturningTrue) { return true }
    // do other things
    if(feelLikeReturningTrueNow) { return true }
    // more things
    return whatIFeelLike ? true : false
  }
}
23

Using Bryan McLemore answer, I extended it to support objects that throw in a safe manor with the Swift 2.0 defer ability.

func synchronized( lock:AnyObject, block:() throws -> Void ) rethrows
{
    objc_sync_enter(lock)
    defer {
        objc_sync_exit(lock)
    }

    try block()
}
1
  • It would be better to use rethrows to simplify usage with non-throwing closures (no need to use try), as shown in my answer.
    – werediver
    Commented Dec 22, 2015 at 10:06
10

In the "Understanding Crashes and Crash Logs" session 414 of the 2018 WWDC they show the following way using DispatchQueues with sync.

In swift 4 should be something like the following:

class ImageCache {
    private let queue = DispatchQueue(label: "sync queue")
    private var storage: [String: UIImage] = [:]
    public subscript(key: String) -> UIImage? {
        get {
          return queue.sync {
            return storage[key]
          }
        }
        set {
          queue.sync {
            storage[key] = newValue
          }
        }
    }
}

Anyway you can also make reads faster using concurrent queues with barriers. Sync and async reads are performed concurrently and writing a new value waits for previous operations to finish.

class ImageCache {
    private let queue = DispatchQueue(label: "with barriers", attributes: .concurrent)
    private var storage: [String: UIImage] = [:]

    func get(_ key: String) -> UIImage? {
        return queue.sync { [weak self] in
            guard let self = self else { return nil }
            return self.storage[key]
        }
    }

    func set(_ image: UIImage, for key: String) {
        queue.async(flags: .barrier) { [weak self] in
            guard let self = self else { return }
            self.storage[key] = image
        }
    }
}
1
  • you probably don't need to block reads and slowdown the queue using sync. You can just use sync for serial writing. Commented Sep 11, 2018 at 20:16
10

Try: NSRecursiveLock

A lock that may be acquired multiple times by the same thread without causing a deadlock.

let lock = NSRecursiveLock()

func f() {
    lock.lock()
    //Your Code
    lock.unlock()
}

func f2() {
    lock.lock()
    defer {
        lock.unlock()
    }
    //Your Code
}

The Objective-C synchronization feature supports recursive and reentrant code. A thread can use a single semaphore several times in a recursive manner; other threads are blocked from using it until the thread releases all the locks obtained with it; that is, every @synchronized() block is exited normally or through an exception. Source

9

With the advent of Swift concurrency, we would use actors.

You can use tasks to break up your program into isolated, concurrent pieces. Tasks are isolated from each other, which is what makes it safe for them to run at the same time, but sometimes you need to share some information between tasks. Actors let you safely share information between concurrent code.

Like classes, actors are reference types, so the comparison of value types and reference types in Classes Are Reference Types applies to actors as well as classes. Unlike classes, actors allow only one task to access their mutable state at a time, which makes it safe for code in multiple tasks to interact with the same instance of an actor. For example, here’s an actor that records temperatures:

actor TemperatureLogger {
    let label: String
    var measurements: [Int]
    private(set) var max: Int

    init(label: String, measurement: Int) {
        self.label = label
        self.measurements = [measurement]
        self.max = measurement
    }
}

You introduce an actor with the actor keyword, followed by its definition in a pair of braces. The TemperatureLogger actor has properties that other code outside the actor can access, and restricts the max property so only code inside the actor can update the maximum value.

For more information, see WWDC video Protect mutable state with Swift actors.


For the sake of completeness, the historical alternatives include:

  • GCD serial queue: This is a simple pre-concurrency approach to ensure that one one thread at a time will interact with the shared resource.

  • Reader-writer pattern with concurrent GCD queue: In reader-writer patterns, one uses a concurrent dispatch queue to perform synchronous, but concurrent, reads (but concurrent with other reads only, not writes) but perform writes asynchronously with a barrier (forcing writes to not be performed concurrently with anything else on that queue). This can offer a performance improvement over a simple GCD serial solution, but in practice, the advantage is modest and comes at the cost of additional complexity (e.g., you have to be careful about thread-explosion scenarios). IMHO, I tend to avoid this pattern, either sticking with the simplicity of the serial queue pattern, or, when the performance difference is critical, using a completely different pattern.

  • Locks: In my Swift tests, lock-based synchronization tends to be substantially faster than either of the GCD approaches. Locks come in a few flavors:

    • NSLock is a nice, relatively efficient lock mechanism.
    • In those cases where performance is of paramount concern, I use “unfair locks”, but you must be careful when using them from Swift (see https://stackoverflow.com/a/66525671/1271826).
    • For the sake of completeness, there is also the recursive lock. IMHO, I would favor simple NSLock over NSRecursiveLock. Recursive locks are subject to abuse and often indicate code smell.
    • You might see references to “spin locks”. Many years ago, they used to be employed where performance was of paramount concern, but they are now deprecated in favor of unfair locks.
  • Technically, one can use semaphores for synchronization, but it tends to be the slowest of all the alternatives.

I outline a few my benchmark results here.

In short, nowadays I use actors for contemporary codebases, GCD serial queues for simple scenarios non-async-await code, and locks in those rare cases where performance is essential.

And, needless to say, we often try to reduce the number of synchronizations altogether. If we can, we often use value types, where each thread gets its own copy. And where synchronization cannot be avoided, we try to minimize the number of those synchronizations where possible.

8

Swift 3

This code has the re-entry ability and can work with Asynchronous function calls. In this code, after someAsyncFunc() is called, another function closure on the serial queue will process but be blocked by semaphore.wait() until signal() is called. internalQueue.sync shouldn't be used as it will block the main thread if I'm not mistaken.

let internalQueue = DispatchQueue(label: "serialQueue")
let semaphore = DispatchSemaphore(value: 1)

internalQueue.async {

    self.semaphore.wait()

    // Critical section

    someAsyncFunc() {

        // Do some work here

        self.semaphore.signal()
    }
}

objc_sync_enter/objc_sync_exit isn't a good idea without error handling.

1
  • What error handling? The compiler won't allow anything that throws. On the other hand, by not using objc_sync_enter/exit, you give up on some substantial performance gains.
    – gnasher729
    Commented Aug 25, 2017 at 20:02
6

Use NSLock in Swift4:

let lock = NSLock()
lock.lock()
if isRunning == true {
        print("Service IS running ==> please wait")
        return
} else {
    print("Service not running")
}
isRunning = true
lock.unlock()

Warning The NSLock class uses POSIX threads to implement its locking behavior. When sending an unlock message to an NSLock object, you must be sure that message is sent from the same thread that sent the initial lock message. Unlocking a lock from a different thread can result in undefined behavior.

2
  • 1
    Eliminating Lock-Based Code
    – Gobe
    Commented Mar 18, 2018 at 16:20
  • And when using locks, nowadays we would use withLock(_:) to ensure that lock and unlock are balanced. In the example in this question, but as soon as you introduce guard statements or other “early exits”, the withLock pattern reduces complexity. So rather than lock.lock() … lock.unlock(), it would be lock.withLock {…}.
    – Rob
    Commented Feb 12 at 18:06
6

With Swift's property wrappers, this is what I'm using now:

@propertyWrapper public struct NCCSerialized<Wrapped> {
    private let queue = DispatchQueue(label: "com.nuclearcyborg.NCCSerialized_\(UUID().uuidString)")

    private var _wrappedValue: Wrapped
    public var wrappedValue: Wrapped {
        get { queue.sync { _wrappedValue } }
        set { queue.sync { _wrappedValue = newValue } }
    }

    public init(wrappedValue: Wrapped) {
        self._wrappedValue = wrappedValue
    }
}

Then you can just do:

@NCCSerialized var foo: Int = 10

or

@NCCSerialized var myData: [SomeStruct] = []

Then access the variable as you normally would.

2
  • 1
    I like this solution, but was curious about the cost of folks @Decorating since doing so has the side effect of creating a DispatchQueue which is hidden from the user. I found this SO reference to put my mind at ease: stackoverflow.com/a/35022486/1060314 Commented Apr 30, 2020 at 20:59
  • The property wrapper itself is quite light -- just a struct, so, one of the lightest things you can make. Thanks for the link on DispatchQueue though. I've had in the back of my mind to do some performance testing on the queue.sync wrap versus other solutions (and versus no queue), but hadn't done so.
    – drewster
    Commented May 3, 2020 at 5:13
3

You can create propertyWrapper Synchronised

Here example with NSLock underhood. You can use for synchronisation whatever you want GCD, posix_locks e.t.c

@propertyWrapper public struct Synchronised<T> {
    private let lock = NSLock()

    private var _wrappedValue: T
    public var wrappedValue: T {
        get {
            lock.lock()
            defer {
                lock.unlock()
            }
            return _wrappedValue
        }
        set {
            lock.lock()
            defer {
                lock.unlock()
            }
            _wrappedValue = newValue
        }
    }

    public init(wrappedValue: T) {
        self._wrappedValue = wrappedValue
    }
}

@Synchronised var example: String = "testing"

based on @drewster answer

1
  • 1
    Or, alternatively, get { lock.withLock { _wrappedValue } } and set { lock.withLock { _wrappedValue = newValue } }.
    – Rob
    Commented Feb 12 at 18:08
2

Figure I'll post my Swift 5 implementation, built off of the prior answers. Thanks guys! I found it helpful to have one that returns a value too, so I have two methods.

Here is a simple class to make first:

import Foundation
class Sync {
public class func synced(_ lock: Any, closure: () -> ()) {
        objc_sync_enter(lock)
        defer { objc_sync_exit(lock) }
        closure()
    }
    public class func syncedReturn(_ lock: Any, closure: () -> (Any?)) -> Any? {
        objc_sync_enter(lock)
        defer { objc_sync_exit(lock) }
        return closure()
    }
}

Then use it like so if needing a return value:

return Sync.syncedReturn(self, closure: {
    // some code here
    return "hello world"
})

Or:

Sync.synced(self, closure: {
    // do some work synchronously
})
3
  • Try public class func synced<T>(_ lock: Any, closure: () -> T), works for both, void and any other type. There is also the regrows stuff.
    – hnh
    Commented Apr 2, 2020 at 16:03
  • @hnh what do you mean by the regrows stuff? Also if you'd be willing to share an example call to the generic method with type <T> that would help me update the answer - I like where you're going with that.
    – TheJeff
    Commented May 11, 2020 at 16:45
  • rethrows, not regrows, srz
    – hnh
    Commented May 12, 2020 at 18:31
1

In conclusion, Here give more common way that include return value or void, and throw

import Foundation

extension NSObject {


    func synchronized<T>(lockObj: AnyObject!, closure: () throws -> T) rethrows ->  T
    {
        objc_sync_enter(lockObj)
        defer {
            objc_sync_exit(lockObj)
        }

        return try closure()
    }


}
3
  • why is defer {sync_exit} after sync_enter but not before ? In Development session I heard that defer should be placed before all code inside function :)
    – iTux
    Commented Jun 7, 2021 at 8:32
  • Because it is reasonable to make objc_sync_exit must happen after objc_sync_enter. Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 6:35
  • But it's exits after enter if you put it before, it's exit on exit from scope, am I right ?)
    – iTux
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 21:27
1

Details

Xcode 8.3.1, Swift 3.1

Task

Read write value from different threads (async).

Code

class AsyncObject<T>:CustomStringConvertible {
    private var _value: T
    public private(set) var dispatchQueueName: String
   
    let dispatchQueue: DispatchQueue
    
    init (value: T, dispatchQueueName: String) {
        _value = value
        self.dispatchQueueName = dispatchQueueName
        dispatchQueue = DispatchQueue(label: dispatchQueueName)
    }
    
    func setValue(with closure: @escaping (_ currentValue: T)->(T) ) {
        dispatchQueue.sync { [weak self] in
            if let _self = self {
                _self._value = closure(_self._value)
            }
        }
    }
    
    func getValue(with closure: @escaping (_ currentValue: T)->() ) {
        dispatchQueue.sync { [weak self] in
            if let _self = self {
                closure(_self._value)
            }
        }
    }
    
    
    var value: T {
        get {
            return dispatchQueue.sync { _value }
        }
        
        set (newValue) {
            dispatchQueue.sync { _value = newValue }
        }
    }

    var description: String {
        return "\(_value)"
    }
}

Usage

print("Single read/write action")
// Use it when when you need to make single action
let obj = AsyncObject<Int>(value: 0, dispatchQueueName: "Dispatch0")
obj.value = 100
let x = obj.value
print(x)

print("Write action in block")
// Use it when when you need to make many action
obj.setValue{ (current) -> (Int) in
    let newValue = current*2
    print("previous: \(current), new: \(newValue)")
    return newValue
}

Full Sample

extension DispatchGroup

extension DispatchGroup {
    
    class func loop(repeatNumber: Int, action: @escaping (_ index: Int)->(), completion: @escaping ()->()) {
        let group = DispatchGroup()
        for index in 0...repeatNumber {
            group.enter()
            DispatchQueue.global(qos: .utility).async {
                action(index)
                group.leave()
            }
        }
        
        group.notify(queue: DispatchQueue.global(qos: .userInitiated)) {
            completion()
        }
    }
}

class ViewController

import UIKit

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        //sample1()
        sample2()
    }
    
    func sample1() {
        print("=================================================\nsample with variable")
        
        let obj = AsyncObject<Int>(value: 0, dispatchQueueName: "Dispatch1")
        
        DispatchGroup.loop(repeatNumber: 5, action: { index in
            obj.value = index
        }) {
            print("\(obj.value)")
        }
    }
    
    func sample2() {
        print("\n=================================================\nsample with array")
        let arr = AsyncObject<[Int]>(value: [], dispatchQueueName: "Dispatch2")
        DispatchGroup.loop(repeatNumber: 15, action: { index in
            arr.setValue{ (current) -> ([Int]) in
                var array = current
                array.append(index*index)
                print("index: \(index), value \(array[array.count-1])")
                return array
            }
        }) {
            print("\(arr.value)")
        }
    }
}
1

What about

final class SpinLock {
    private let lock = NSRecursiveLock()

    func sync<T>(action: () -> T) -> T {
        lock.lock()
        defer { lock.unlock() }
        return action()
    }
}
0

Why make it difficult and hassle with locks? Use Dispatch Barriers.

A dispatch barrier creates a synchronization point within a concurrent queue.

While it’s running, no other block on the queue is allowed to run, even if it’s concurrent and other cores are available.

If that sounds like an exclusive (write) lock, it is. Non-barrier blocks can be thought of as shared (read) locks.

As long as all access to the resource is performed through the queue, barriers provide very cheap synchronization.

2
  • 2
    I mean, you're assuming the use of a GCD queue to synchronize access, but that's not mentioned in the original question. And a barrier is only necessary with a concurrent queue - you can simply use a serial queue to queue up mutually excluded blocks to emulate a lock.
    – Bill
    Commented Aug 7, 2015 at 19:10
  • My question, why emulate a lock? From what I read, locks are discouraged due to the overhead vs a barrier within a queue. Commented Aug 7, 2015 at 19:18
0

dispatch_barrier_async is the better way, while not blocking current thread.

dispatch_barrier_async(accessQueue, { dictionary[object.ID] = object })

-1

Based on ɲeuroburɳ, test an sub-class case

class Foo: NSObject {
    func test() {
        print("1")
        objc_sync_enter(self)
        defer {
            objc_sync_exit(self)
            print("3")
        }

        print("2")
    }
}


class Foo2: Foo {
    override func test() {
        super.test()

        print("11")
        objc_sync_enter(self)
        defer {
            print("33")
            objc_sync_exit(self)
        }

        print("22")
    }
}

let test = Foo2()
test.test()

Output:

1
2
3
11
22
33
-5

Another method is to create a superclass and then inherit it. This way you can use GCD more directly

class Lockable {
    let lockableQ:dispatch_queue_t

    init() {
        lockableQ = dispatch_queue_create("com.blah.blah.\(self.dynamicType)", DISPATCH_QUEUE_SERIAL)
    }

    func lock(closure: () -> ()) {
        dispatch_sync(lockableQ, closure)
    }
}


class Foo: Lockable {

    func boo() {
        lock {
            ....... do something
        }
    }
1
  • 10
    -1 Inheritance gives you subtype polymorphism in return for increasing coupling. Avoid the later if you don’t need the former. Don’t be lazy. Prefer composition for code reuse.
    – Jano
    Commented Nov 23, 2015 at 22:20

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