Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Assume class Child is a derived class of the class Parent. In a five file program, how would I specify in Child.h that I want to call the constructor of Parent? I don't think something like the following is legal inside the header:

Child(int Param, int ParamTwo) : Parent(Param);

In this situation, what should Child.cpp's constructor syntax look like?

share|improve this question
    
Possible duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/120876/… ? –  quantdev Jun 4 '14 at 20:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In Child.h, you would simply declare:

Child(int Param, int ParamTwo);

In Child.cpp, you would then have:

Child::Child(int Param, int ParamTwo) : Parent(Param) {
    //rest of constructor here
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I feel silly for not knowing this. –  user3658679 Jun 4 '14 at 20:55

The initialization list of a constructor is part of its definition. You can either define it inline in your class declaration

class Child : public Parent {
    // ...
    Child(int Param, int ParamTwo) : Parent(Param)
    { /* Note the body */ }
};

or just declare it

class Child : public Parent {
    // ...
    Child(int Param, int ParamTwo);
};

and define in the compilation unit (Child.cpp)

Child::Child(int Param, int ParamTwo) : Parent(Param) {
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 BTW: using implementation instead of definition could be less misleading. –  Wolf Jun 4 '14 at 21:16
    
@Wolf It's the 'official' terminology :P ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 4 '14 at 21:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.