423

How do you add an observer in Swift to the default notification center? I'm trying to port this line of code that sends a notification when the battery level changes.

[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(batteryLevelChanged:) name:UIDeviceBatteryLevelDidChangeNotification object:nil];
3

14 Answers 14

790

Swift 4.0 & Xcode 9.0+:

Send(Post) Notification:

NotificationCenter.default.post(name: Notification.Name("NotificationIdentifier"), object: nil)

OR

NotificationCenter.default.post(name: Notification.Name("NotificationIdentifier"), object: nil, userInfo: ["Renish":"Dadhaniya"])

Receive(Get) Notification:

NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(self.methodOfReceivedNotification(notification:)), name: Notification.Name("NotificationIdentifier"), object: nil)

Function-Method handler for received Notification:

@objc func methodOfReceivedNotification(notification: Notification) {}

Swift 3.0 & Xcode 8.0+:

Send(Post) Notification:

NotificationCenter.default.post(name: Notification.Name("NotificationIdentifier"), object: nil)

Receive(Get) Notification:

NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(YourClassName.methodOfReceivedNotification(notification:)), name: Notification.Name("NotificationIdentifier"), object: nil)

Method handler for received Notification:

func methodOfReceivedNotification(notification: Notification) {
  // Take Action on Notification
}

Remove Notification:

deinit {
  NotificationCenter.default.removeObserver(self, name: Notification.Name("NotificationIdentifier"), object: nil)
}

Swift 2.3 & Xcode 7:

Send(Post) Notification

NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().postNotificationName("NotificationIdentifier", object: nil)

Receive(Get) Notification

NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().addObserver(self, selector: #selector(YourClassName.methodOfReceivedNotification(_:)), name:"NotificationIdentifier", object: nil)

Method handler for received Notification

func methodOfReceivedNotification(notification: NSNotification){
  // Take Action on Notification
}


For historic Xcode versions...



Send(Post) Notification

NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().postNotificationName("NotificationIdentifier", object: nil)

Receive(Get) Notification

NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().addObserver(self, selector: "methodOfReceivedNotification:", name:"NotificationIdentifier", object: nil)

Remove Notification

NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().removeObserver(self, name: "NotificationIdentifier", object: nil)
NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().removeObserver(self) // Remove from all notifications being observed

Method handler for received Notification

func methodOfReceivedNotification(notification: NSNotification) {
  // Take Action on Notification
}

Annotate either the class or the target method with @objc

@objc private func methodOfReceivedNotification(notification: NSNotification) {
  // Take Action on Notification
}

// Or

dynamic private func methodOfReceivedNotification(notification: NSNotification) {
  // Take Action on Notification
}
27
  • 21
    Be sure to annotate either the class or the target method with @objc.
    – Klaas
    Aug 24 '14 at 23:24
  • 1
    @goofansu Are you sure? I reckon that you have to add it when it's a pure Swift class.
    – Klaas
    Dec 30 '14 at 10:25
  • 10
    methodOFReceivedNotication must be either annotated with dynamic or be a member of a subclass of NSObject.
    – Klaas
    Dec 30 '14 at 13:37
  • 1
    If not, I get a runtime warning object 0x7fd68852d710 of class 'TestNotifications.MyObject' does not implement methodSignatureForSelector: -- trouble ahead, Unrecognized selector -[TestNotifications.MyObject methodOFReceivedNotication:]
    – Klaas
    Dec 30 '14 at 13:38
  • 2
    @TaylorAllred, Thank you very much for review my answer. I am really appreciate your suggestion. I have changed it. Please review it. Feb 26 '15 at 4:12
467

It's the same as the Objective-C API, but uses Swift's syntax.

Swift 4.2 & Swift 5:

NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(
    self,
    selector: #selector(self.batteryLevelChanged),
    name: UIDevice.batteryLevelDidChangeNotification,
    object: nil)

If your observer does not inherit from an Objective-C object, you must prefix your method with @objc in order to use it as a selector.

@objc private func batteryLevelChanged(notification: NSNotification){     
    //do stuff using the userInfo property of the notification object
}

See NSNotificationCenter Class Reference, Interacting with Objective-C APIs

14
  • 14
    @BerryBlue, did the above solution work for you? I believe that you need to change "batteryLevelChanged" to "batteryLevelChanged:" if your function accepts the NSNotification as a parameter.
    – Olshansk
    Jun 5 '14 at 2:46
  • why is UIDeviceBatteryLevelDidChangeNotification not in quotes? It's a string type.
    – kmiklas
    Jun 18 '14 at 21:16
  • @kmiklas You can put it in quotes if you want. UIDeviceBatteryLevelDidChangeNotification is an NSString of "UIDeviceBatteryLevelDidChangeNotification". Either way you get the same result
    – Connor
    Jun 19 '14 at 1:29
  • @connor ..Until Apple decides to change the underlying string value. Use the string constant Apple gave you. Aug 15 '14 at 21:41
  • 15
    Be sure to annotate either the class or the target method with @objc.
    – Klaas
    Aug 24 '14 at 23:32
49

A nice way of doing this is to use the addObserver(forName:object:queue:using:) method rather than the addObserver(_:selector:name:object:) method that is often used from Objective-C code. The advantage of the first variant is that you don't have to use the @objc attribute on your method:

    func batteryLevelChanged(notification: Notification) {
        // do something useful with this information
    }

    let observer = NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(
        forName: NSNotification.Name.UIDeviceBatteryLevelDidChange,
        object: nil, queue: nil,
        using: batteryLevelChanged)

and you can even just use a closure instead of a method if you want:

    let observer = NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(
        forName: NSNotification.Name.UIDeviceBatteryLevelDidChange,
        object: nil, queue: nil) { _ in print("🔋") }

You can use the returned value to stop listening for the notification later:

    NotificationCenter.default.removeObserver(observer)

There used to be another advantage in using this method, which was that it doesn't require you to use selector strings which couldn't be statically checked by the compiler and so were fragile to breaking if the method is renamed, but Swift 2.2 and later include #selector expressions that fix that problem.

4
  • 7
    This is great! For completeness I would just like to see unregistering example too. It is quite different then the addObserver(_:selector:name:object:) way of unregistering. You have to keep the object returned by addObserverForName(_:object:queue:usingBlock:) and pass it to removeObserver: Feb 26 '16 at 13:57
  • 1
    This needs updating to include de-registration of the objected returned by addObserverForName(_:object:queue:usingBlock:).
    – Hyperbole
    Mar 29 '16 at 16:55
  • 4
    This is a much better answer than connor's or Renish's (both above at time of this comment) because it gets around having to use the Obj-C #selector methods. The result is much more Swift-y and more correct, IMO. Thanks!
    – patr1ck
    Jul 16 '16 at 17:41
  • 2
    Remember, if you use this in, say, a UIViewController and refer to self in that closure, you need to use [weak self] or you'll have a reference cycle and the memory leak.
    – Rob N
    Oct 11 '17 at 13:39
41

Swift 3.0 in Xcode 8

Swift 3.0 has replaced many "stringly-typed" APIs with struct "wrapper types", as is the case with NotificationCenter. Notifications are now identified by a struct Notfication.Name rather than by String. See the Migrating to Swift 3 guide.

Previous usage:

// Define identifier
let notificationIdentifier: String = "NotificationIdentifier"

// Register to receive notification
NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().addObserver(self, selector: #selector(YourClassName.methodOfReceivedNotification(_:)), name: notificationIdentifier, object: nil)

// Post a notification
NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().postNotificationName(notificationIdentifier, object: nil)

New Swift 3.0 usage:

// Define identifier
let notificationName = Notification.Name("NotificationIdentifier")

// Register to receive notification
NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(YourClassName.methodOfReceivedNotification), name: notificationName, object: nil)

// Post notification
NotificationCenter.default.post(name: notificationName, object: nil)

All of the system notification types are now defined as static constants on Notification.Name; i.e. .UIDeviceBatteryLevelDidChange, .UIApplicationDidFinishLaunching, .UITextFieldTextDidChange, etc.

You can extend Notification.Name with your own custom notifications in order to stay consistent with the system notifications:

// Definition:
extension Notification.Name {
    static let yourCustomNotificationName = Notification.Name("yourCustomNotificationName")
}

// Usage:
NotificationCenter.default.post(name: .yourCustomNotificationName, object: nil)
41
  1. Declare a notification name

    extension Notification.Name {
        static let purchaseDidFinish = Notification.Name("purchaseDidFinish")
    }
    
  2. You can add observer in two ways:

    Using Selector

    NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(myFunction), name: .purchaseDidFinish, object: nil)
    
    @objc func myFunction(notification: Notification) {
        print(notification.object ?? "") //myObject
        print(notification.userInfo ?? "") //[AnyHashable("key"): "Value"]
    }
    

    or using block

    NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(forName: .purchaseDidFinish, object: nil, queue: nil) { [weak self] (notification) in
        guard let strongSelf = self else {
            return
        }
    
        strongSelf.myFunction(notification: notification)
    }
    
    func myFunction(notification: Notification) {
        print(notification.object ?? "") //myObject
        print(notification.userInfo ?? "") //[AnyHashable("key"): "Value"]
    }
    
  3. Post your notification

    NotificationCenter.default.post(name: .purchaseDidFinish, object: "myObject", userInfo: ["key": "Value"])
    

from iOS 9 and OS X 10.11. It is no longer necessary for an NSNotificationCenter observer to un-register itself when being deallocated. more info

For a block based implementation you need to do a weak-strong dance if you want to use self inside the block. more info

Block based observers need to be removed more info

let center = NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter()
center.removeObserver(self.localeChangeObserver)
3
  • 6
    "from iOS 9 and OS X 10.11. It is no longer necessary for an NSNotificationCenter observer to un-register itself when being deallocated." This is true only for the Selector based observers. Block based observers still need to be removed.
    – Abhinav
    Nov 20 '18 at 4:04
  • You don't need to do the weak-strong dance if there is only one line of code in the block. You can just use the weak like self?.myFunction. Well that was the case with ObjC I assume it is the same in Swift.
    – malhal
    Jul 3 '20 at 8:04
  • @Abhinav how come do they have such differences? It's pretty weird.
    – allenlinli
    Jul 28 at 9:11
8

Pass Data using NSNotificationCenter

You can also pass data using NotificationCentre in swift 3.0 and NSNotificationCenter in swift 2.0.

Swift 2.0 Version

Pass info using userInfo which is a optional Dictionary of type [NSObject : AnyObject]?

let imageDataDict:[String: UIImage] = ["image": image]

// Post a notification
 NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().postNotificationName(notificationName, object: nil, userInfo: imageDataDict)

// Register to receive notification in your class
NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().addObserver(self, selector: #selector(self.showSpinningWheel(_:)), name: notificationName, object: nil)

// handle notification
func showSpinningWheel(notification: NSNotification) {
  if let image = notification.userInfo?["image"] as? UIImage {
  // do something with your image   
  }
}

Swift 3.0 Version

The userInfo now takes [AnyHashable:Any]? as an argument, which we provide as a dictionary literal in Swift

let imageDataDict:[String: UIImage] = ["image": image]

// post a notification
 NotificationCenter.default.post(name: NSNotification.Name(rawValue: "notificationName"), object: nil, userInfo: imageDataDict) 
// `default` is now a property, not a method call

// Register to receive notification in your class
NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(self.showSpinningWheel(_:)), name: NSNotification.Name(rawValue: "notificationName"), object: nil)

// handle notification
func showSpinningWheel(_ notification: NSNotification) {

  if let image = notification.userInfo?["image"] as? UIImage {
  // do something with your image   
  }
}

Source pass data using NotificationCentre(swift 3.0) and NSNotificationCenter(swift 2.0)

1
  • Glad to hear it helped you :)
    – Sahil
    Dec 13 '17 at 17:11
8

In Swift 5

Let's say if want to Receive Data from ViewControllerB to ViewControllerA

ViewControllerA (Receiver)

import UIKit

class ViewControllerA: UIViewController  {

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        //MARK: - - - - - Code for Passing Data through Notification Observer - - - - -
        // add observer in controller(s) where you want to receive data
        NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(self.methodOfReceivedNotification(notification:)), name: Notification.Name("NotificationIdentifier"), object: nil)
    }

    //MARK: - - - - - Method for receiving Data through Post Notificaiton - - - - -
    @objc func methodOfReceivedNotification(notification: Notification) {
        print("Value of notification : ", notification.object ?? "")
    }
}

ViewControllerB (Sender)

import UIKit

class ViewControllerB: UIViewController {

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        //MARK: - - - - - Set data for Passing Data Post Notification - - - - -
        let objToBeSent = "Test Message from Notification"
        NotificationCenter.default.post(name: Notification.Name("NotificationIdentifier"), object: objToBeSent)
    }

}
4

Swift 5 Notification Observer

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad() 
    NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(batteryLevelChanged), name: UIDevice.batteryLevelDidChangeNotification, object: nil)
}

@objc func batteryLevelChanged(notification : NSNotification){
    //do here code
}

override func viewWillDisappear(_ animated: Bool) {
    NotificationCenter.default.removeObserver(self, name: UIDevice.batteryLevelDidChangeNotification, object: nil)

}
3

I'm able to do one of the following to successfully use a selector - without annotating anything with @objc:

NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().addObserver(self,
    selector:"batteryLevelChanged:" as Selector,
    name:"UIDeviceBatteryLevelDidChangeNotification",
    object:nil)    

OR

let notificationSelector: Selector = "batteryLevelChanged:"

NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().addObserver(self,
    selector: notificationSelector,
    name:"UIDeviceBatteryLevelDidChangeNotification",
    object:nil)    

My xcrun version shows Swift 1.2, and this works on Xcode 6.4 and Xcode 7 beta 2 (which I thought would be using Swift 2.0):

$xcrun swift --version

Apple Swift version 1.2 (swiftlang-602.0.53.1 clang-602.0.53)
8
  • You don't need to annotate with @objc if your observer class inherits from NSObject. Jul 9 '15 at 13:33
  • And you shouldn't need to explicitly cast a String to Selector either. :) Jul 9 '15 at 13:33
  • @alfvata: My observer class does not inherit from NSObject. It inherits from AnyObject, Swift-style. Explicitly casting the string to Selector is allowing me to avoid doing any of the other Objective-C-related workarounds.
    – leanne
    Jul 9 '15 at 22:00
  • I'm not sure I understand how that works. I removed the @objc annotation from the method in my non-NSObject observer class, added the as Selector casting to the String selector name, and when the notification fires the app crashes. My Swift version is exactly the same as yours. Jul 10 '15 at 9:50
  • 3
    @alfavata, I don't know what to tell you. I'm now on Xcode Beta 4, and it's still working. My project is totally Swift; there are no Objective-C components. Maybe that makes a difference. Maybe there's something different in the project settings. There are any number of possibilities! I'll say: as long as the @objc annotation works for you, and this way doesn't, then keep annotating!
    – leanne
    Jul 27 '15 at 15:47
2

In swift 2.2 - XCode 7.3, we use #selector for NSNotificationCenter

 NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().addObserver(self, selector: #selector(rotate), name: UIDeviceOrientationDidChangeNotification, object: nil)
0
1

We should remove notification also.

Ex.

deinit 
{
  NotificationCenter.default.removeObserver(self, name:NSNotification.Name(rawValue: "notify"), object: nil)

}
1
  • 4
    I believe you don't need this since iOS 9. It's done automatically. Sep 25 '17 at 7:16
1

In swift 3, Xcode 8.2:- checking battery state level

//Add observer
NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(batteryStateDidChange), name: NSNotification.Name.UIDeviceBatteryStateDidChange, object: nil)


 //Fired when battery level changes

 func batteryStateDidChange(notification: NSNotification){
        //perform manipulation here
    }
1

NSNotificationCenter add observer syntax in Swift 4.0 for iOS 11

  NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(keyboardShow), name: NSNotification.Name.UIKeyboardWillShow, object: nil)

This is for keyboardWillShow notification name type. Other type can be selected from the available option

the Selector is of type @objc func which handle how the keyboard will show ( this is your user function )

1
  • Just to clarify for anyone reading this answer: "the Selector is of type @objc func..." means the function associated with #selector must be annotated with @objc. For example: @objc func keyboardShow() { ... } That threw me for a minute in Swift 4!
    – leanne
    Oct 17 '17 at 22:29
0

Swift 5 & Xcode 10.2:

NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(
            self,
            selector: #selector(batteryLevelDidChangeNotification),
            name: UIDevice.batteryLevelDidChangeNotification,
            object: nil)

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