284

How to use threading in swift?

dispatchOnMainThread:^{

    NSLog(@"Block Executed On %s", dispatch_queue_get_label(dispatch_get_current_queue()));

}];
  • Which part do you have trouble converting? – nschum Jun 5 '14 at 9:18
  • 2
    Why do you have ] before the semicolon in the last line? – akashivskyy Jun 5 '14 at 9:29
  • 2
    it would be helpful ifyou explain where you are stuck or which you need help with. – nsuinteger Jun 5 '14 at 9:43
  • 3
    You must accept the correct answer if it really helps you, it will helps other also to find the correct solution. – Amit Singh Jul 1 '16 at 9:37

15 Answers 15

647

Swift 3.0+

A lot has been modernized in Swift 3.0. Running something on the background thread looks like this:

DispatchQueue.global(qos: .background).async {
    print("This is run on the background queue")

    DispatchQueue.main.async {
        print("This is run on the main queue, after the previous code in outer block")
    }
}

Swift 1.2 through 2.3

let qualityOfServiceClass = QOS_CLASS_BACKGROUND
let backgroundQueue = dispatch_get_global_queue(qualityOfServiceClass, 0)
dispatch_async(backgroundQueue, {
    print("This is run on the background queue")

    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), { () -> Void in
        print("This is run on the main queue, after the previous code in outer block")
    })
})

Pre Swift 1.2 – Known issue

As of Swift 1.1 Apple didn't support the above syntax without some modifications. Passing QOS_CLASS_BACKGROUND didn't actually work, instead use Int(QOS_CLASS_BACKGROUND.value).

For more information see Apples documentation

  • 23
    And if someone wants a more Swift like syntax, I've created Async that adds some sugar to the syntax like Async.background {} – tobiasdm Sep 13 '14 at 21:50
  • I am using your code in xCode 6.0.1 and ios 8.It gives error as "QOS_CLASS_BACKGROUND" return class and it is of type UInt32 and "dispatch_get_global_queue" requires 1st parameter as int so type error is coming. – Zalak Patel Oct 29 '14 at 12:43
  • So in Xcode 6.1.1 I am not getting an error for using just plain simple "QOS_CLASS_BACKGROUND". Is it fixed? – Lucas Goossen Jan 27 '15 at 23:18
  • @LucasGoossen Yes, it has been fixed. I've update the post accordingly. – tobiasdm Feb 9 '15 at 22:30
  • 1
    @NikitaPronchik Isn't this clear from the answer? Else feel free to make a edit to it. – tobiasdm Mar 3 '15 at 21:16
116

The best practice is to define a reusable function that can be accessed multiple times.

REUSABLE FUNCTION:

e.g. somewhere like AppDelegate.swift as a Global Function.

func backgroundThread(_ delay: Double = 0.0, background: (() -> Void)? = nil, completion: (() -> Void)? = nil) {
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(Int(QOS_CLASS_USER_INITIATED.value), 0)) {
        background?()

        let popTime = dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, Int64(delay * Double(NSEC_PER_SEC)))
        dispatch_after(popTime, dispatch_get_main_queue()) {
            completion?()
        }
    }
}

Note: in Swift 2.0, replace QOS_CLASS_USER_INITIATED.value above with QOS_CLASS_USER_INITIATED.rawValue instead

USAGE:

A. To run a process in the background with a delay of 3 seconds:

    backgroundThread(3.0, background: {
            // Your background function here
    })

B. To run a process in the background then run a completion in the foreground:

    backgroundThread(background: {
            // Your function here to run in the background
    },
    completion: {
            // A function to run in the foreground when the background thread is complete
    })

C. To delay by 3 seconds - note use of completion parameter without background parameter:

    backgroundThread(3.0, completion: {
            // Your delayed function here to be run in the foreground
    })
  • 1
    nice snippet, should be the correct answer. @Dale Clifford – LoVo Jun 22 '15 at 9:48
  • 2
    Very nice. Would you please confirm, the delay only works for the completion block. So that means that the delay in A. has no impact, and the background block executes immediately without delay. – ObjectiveTC Sep 19 '15 at 13:46
  • 1
    Getting error, backgroundThread is not declared – Vijay Singh Rana Nov 24 '15 at 6:44
  • 1
    You should be able to replace if(background != nil){ background!(); } with background?() for a somewhat swiftier syntax? – Simon Bengtsson Jul 25 '16 at 15:25
  • 1
    Could you please update this for Swift 3? The auto converter turned it into DispatchQueue.global(priority: Int(DispatchQoS.QoSClass.userInitiated.rawValue)).async { but this throws an error like cannot invoke initializer for type 'Int' with an argument list of type '(qos_class_t)'. A working solution is found here (DispatchQueue.global(qos: DispatchQoS.QoSClass.userInitiated).async). – Dev-iL Oct 4 '16 at 18:21
52

Dan Beaulieu's answer in swift5 (also working since swift 3.0.1).

Swift 5.0.1

extension DispatchQueue {

    static func background(delay: Double = 0.0, background: (()->Void)? = nil, completion: (() -> Void)? = nil) {
        DispatchQueue.global(qos: .background).async {
            background?()
            if let completion = completion {
                DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + delay, execute: {
                    completion()
                })
            }
        }
    }

}

Usage

DispatchQueue.background(delay: 3.0, background: {
    // do something in background
}, completion: {
    // when background job finishes, wait 3 seconds and do something in main thread
})

DispatchQueue.background(background: {
    // do something in background
}, completion:{
    // when background job finished, do something in main thread
})

DispatchQueue.background(delay: 3.0, completion:{
    // do something in main thread after 3 seconds
})
  • Amazing, thank you for updating so nicely to the Swift 3.0.1 format! – Dale Clifford Feb 11 '17 at 9:03
  • 1
    I use extensions more than any living person. But there's a real danger in using an extension that is no different, at all, from the original! – Fattie Feb 26 '17 at 19:56
  • @Frouo Very elegant, is it possible to add a completion handler to when 4 async calls all finish? I know its a bit off-topic. – eonist Feb 28 '17 at 11:16
  • 1
    yup forget that link. all you need is a dispatch group - it's very very simple; no worries at all ! – Fattie Feb 28 '17 at 19:55
  • 1
    @DilipJangid you can't, unless your job in the background closure is very very very long (~=infinite). This method is made to last for a finite time: the time your background job needs to execute. So, completion closure will be called as soon as your background job execution time + delay has passed. – frouo May 30 '17 at 10:25
40

Swift 3 version

Swift 3 utilizes new DispatchQueue class to manage queues and threads. To run something on the background thread you would use:

let backgroundQueue = DispatchQueue(label: "com.app.queue", qos: .background)
backgroundQueue.async {
    print("Run on background thread")
}

Or if you want something in two lines of code:

DispatchQueue.global(qos: .background).async {
    print("Run on background thread")

    DispatchQueue.main.async {
        print("We finished that.")
        // only back on the main thread, may you access UI:
        label.text = "Done."
    }
}

You can also get some in-depth info about GDC in Swift 3 in this tutorial.

  • Said. Since your answer is the best, I threw in a line of code showing how you "call back when finished". Feel free to unwind or edit, cheers – Fattie Feb 26 '17 at 20:01
34

From Jameson Quave's tutorial

Swift 2

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), {
    //All stuff here
})
  • 3
    Just for clarification, why would this be used instead of the accepted answer? Is this just an older API? – Sirens Apr 19 '15 at 19:00
  • 1
    @Sirens I would think this would be very useful for apps supporting < iOS 8. – bperdue Apr 22 '15 at 16:27
  • I use this for iOs 8.2 to force processes. – μολὼν.λαβέ May 5 '15 at 17:51
  • DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT reverts to QOS_CLASS_DEFAULT. So I guess you could say it's more high level / accepted syntax. – PostCodeism Dec 10 '15 at 0:56
  • didn't work in Swift 3 – Kirill Oct 26 '16 at 13:04
22

You have to separate out the changes that you want to run in the background from the updates you want to run on the UI:

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0)) {
    // do your task

    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue()) {
        // update some UI
    }
}
  • So dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue()) { // update some UI } is called when the background statement(Outer Block) is done executing? – justColbs Nov 7 '15 at 14:22
  • Isn't this only for Swift 2.3 and below? – Surz Sep 23 '16 at 4:08
20

In Swift 4.2 and Xcode 10.1

We have three types of Queues :

1. Main Queue: Main queue is a serial queue which is created by the system and associated with the application main thread.

2. Global Queue : Global queue is a concurrent queue which we can request with respect to the priority of the tasks.

3. Custom queues : can be created by the user. Custom concurrent queues always mapped into one of the global queues by specifying a Quality of Service property (QoS).

DispatchQueue.main//Main thread
DispatchQueue.global(qos: .userInitiated)// High Priority
DispatchQueue.global(qos: .userInteractive)//High Priority (Little Higher than userInitiated)
DispatchQueue.global(qos: .background)//Lowest Priority
DispatchQueue.global(qos: .default)//Normal Priority (after High but before Low)
DispatchQueue.global(qos: .utility)//Low Priority
DispatchQueue.global(qos: .unspecified)//Absence of Quality

These all Queues can be executed in two ways

1. Synchronous execution

2. Asynchronous execution

DispatchQueue.global(qos: .background).async {
    // do your job here
    DispatchQueue.main.async {
        // update ui here
    }
}

//Perform some task and update UI immediately.
DispatchQueue.global(qos: .userInitiated).async {  
    // Perform task
    DispatchQueue.main.async {  
        // Update UI
        self.tableView.reloadData()  
    }
}

//To call or execute function after some time
DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + 5.0) {
    //Here call your function
}

//If you want to do changes in UI use this
DispatchQueue.main.async(execute: {
    //Update UI
    self.tableView.reloadData()
})

From AppCoda : https://www.appcoda.com/grand-central-dispatch/

//This will print synchronously means, it will print 1-9 & 100-109
func simpleQueues() {
    let queue = DispatchQueue(label: "com.appcoda.myqueue")

    queue.sync {
        for i in 0..<10 {
            print("🔴", i)
        }
    }

    for i in 100..<110 {
        print("Ⓜ️", i)
    }
}

//This will print asynchronously 
func simpleQueues() {
    let queue = DispatchQueue(label: "com.appcoda.myqueue")

    queue.async {
        for i in 0..<10 {
            print("🔴", i)
        }
    }

    for i in 100..<110 {
        print("Ⓜ️", i)
    }
}
19

Swift 4.x

Put this in some file:

func background(work: @escaping () -> ()) {
    DispatchQueue.global(qos: .userInitiated).async {
        work()
    }
}

func main(work: @escaping () -> ()) {
    DispatchQueue.main.async {
        work()
    }
}

and then call it where you need:

background {
     //background job
     main {
       //update UI (or what you need to do in main thread)
     }
}
9

Good answers though, anyway I want to share my Object Oriented solution Up to date for swift 5.

please check it out: AsyncTask

Conceptually inspired by android's AsyncTask, I've wrote my own class in Swift

AsyncTask enables proper and easy use of the UI thread. This class allows to perform background operations and publish results on the UI thread.

Here are few usage examples

Example 1 -

AsyncTask(backgroundTask: {(p:String)->Void in//set BGParam to String and BGResult to Void
        print(p);//print the value in background thread
    }).execute("Hello async");//execute with value 'Hello async'

Example 2 -

let task2=AsyncTask(beforeTask: {
           print("pre execution");//print 'pre execution' before backgroundTask
        },backgroundTask:{(p:Int)->String in//set BGParam to Int & BGResult to String
            if p>0{//check if execution value is bigger than zero
               return "positive"//pass String "poitive" to afterTask
            }
            return "negative";//otherwise pass String "negative"
        }, afterTask: {(p:String) in
            print(p);//print background task result
    });
    task2.execute(1);//execute with value 1

It has 2 generic types:

  • BGParam - the type of the parameter sent to the task upon execution.
  • BGResult - the type of the result of the background computation.

    When you create an AsyncTask you can those types to whatever you need to pass in and out of the background task, but if you don't need those types, you can mark it as unused with just setting it to: Void or with shorter syntax: ()

When an asynchronous task is executed, it goes through 3 steps:

  1. beforeTask:()->Void invoked on the UI thread just before the task is executed.
  2. backgroundTask: (param:BGParam)->BGResult invoked on the background thread immediately after
  3. afterTask:(param:BGResult)->Void invoked on the UI thread with result from the background task
  • 4
    This works wonderfully for me. Nice work, why not put it on github? – 36 By Design Jul 9 '16 at 2:36
6

Since the OP question has already been answered above I just want to add some speed considerations:

I don't recommend running tasks with the .background thread priority especially on the iPhone X where the task seems to be allocated on the low power cores.

Here is some real data from a computationally intensive function that reads from an XML file (with buffering) and performs data interpolation:

Device name / .background / .utility / .default / .userInitiated / .userInteractive

  1. iPhone X: 18.7s / 6.3s / 1.8s / 1.8s / 1.8s
  2. iPhone 7: 4.6s / 3.1s / 3.0s / 2.8s / 2.6s
  3. iPhone 5s: 7.3s / 6.1s / 4.0s / 4.0s / 3.8s

Note that the data set is not the same for all devices. It's the biggest on the iPhone X and the smallest on the iPhone 5s.

1

I really like Dan Beaulieu's answer, but it doesn't work with Swift 2.2 and I think we can avoid those nasty forced unwraps!

func backgroundThread(delay: Double = 0.0, background: (() -> Void)? = nil, completion: (() -> Void)? = nil) {

    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(QOS_CLASS_USER_INITIATED, 0)) {

        background?()

        if let completion = completion{
            let popTime = dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, Int64(delay * Double(NSEC_PER_SEC)))
            dispatch_after(popTime, dispatch_get_main_queue()) {
                completion()
            }
        }
    }
}
1

Grand Central Dispatch is used to handle multitasking in our iOS apps.

You can use this code

// Using time interval

DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: DispatchTime.now()+1) {
    print("Hello World")
}

// Background thread
queue.sync {
     for i in 0..<10 {
          print("Hello", i)
     }
}

// Main thread
for i in 20..<30 {
     print("Hello", i)
}

More information use this link : https://www.programminghub.us/2018/07/integrate-dispatcher-in-swift.html

0
dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(QOS_CLASS_BACKGROUND, 0), {
    // Conversion into base64 string
    self.uploadImageString =  uploadPhotoDataJPEG.base64EncodedStringWithOptions(NSDataBase64EncodingOptions.EncodingEndLineWithCarriageReturn)
})
0

Multi purpose function for thread

public enum QueueType {
        case Main
        case Background
        case LowPriority
        case HighPriority

        var queue: DispatchQueue {
            switch self {
            case .Main:
                return DispatchQueue.main
            case .Background:
                return DispatchQueue(label: "com.app.queue",
                                     qos: .background,
                                     target: nil)
            case .LowPriority:
                return DispatchQueue.global(qos: .userInitiated)
            case .HighPriority:
                return DispatchQueue.global(qos: .userInitiated)
            }
        }
    }

    func performOn(_ queueType: QueueType, closure: @escaping () -> Void) {
        queueType.queue.async(execute: closure)
    }

Use it like :

performOn(.Background) {
    //Code
}
  • I really like the look of this--but I'm brand new to swift and there are no upvotes... – CamHart Jun 13 at 21:18
-3

in Swift 4.2 this works.

import Foundation

class myThread: Thread
{
    override func main() {
        while(true) {
            print("Running in the Thread");
            Thread.sleep(forTimeInterval: 4);
        }
    }
}

let t = myThread();
t.start();

while(true) {
    print("Main Loop");
    sleep(5);
}
  • dont show while(true) in such an example.. – Marcel Gangwisch Nov 14 '18 at 12:43

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