57

I have an array of numbers typed Int.

I want to loop through this array and determine if each number is odd or even.

How can I determine if a number is odd or even in Swift?

0
121
var myArray = [23, 54, 51, 98, 54, 23, 32];
for myInt: Int in myArray{
  if myInt % 2 == 0 {
    println("\(myInt) is even number")
  } else {
    println("\(myInt) is odd number")
  }
}
3
  • Oh Sorry! yes it's dead straight. Actually, while coding i had an compile error in the above code. Due to which it was showing me errors on the line (Where i was using % and / operators) as well.
    – Asif Bilal
    Jun 6 '14 at 13:46
  • 2
    Here's a functional approach: let numbers = [0, 1, 2, 3] let evenNumbers = numbers.filter { $0 % 2 == 0 } let oddNumbers = numbers.filter { $0 % 2 != 0 } Aug 3 '18 at 8:45
  • I'm using this with .isHidden, such as img1.isHidden = pageNumber % 2 == 0 and img2.isHidden = pageNumber % 2 != 0 Jun 17 '19 at 11:29
34

Use the % Remainder Operator (aka the Modulo Operator) to check if a number is even:

if yourNumber % 2 == 0 {
  // Even Number
} else {
  // Odd Number
}

or, use remainder(dividingBy:) to make the same check:

if yourNumber.remainder(dividingBy: 2) == 0 {                
  // Even Number 
} else {
  // Odd Number
}
8
  • 3
    Well there is better and much faster way to do it using AND (&) operator let inputArray = [23,25,2,4,9] for x in inputArray { if ( x&1 == 1) { print ("odd") } else { print ("even") } }
    – i.AsifNoor
    Sep 19 '17 at 14:09
  • 1
    @i.AsifNoor I agree with You. But modulus (getting rest from division) operation has same code in all languages.
    – num8er
    Sep 19 '17 at 16:16
  • 3
    SHORT WAY extension Int { func isEven() -> Bool { return (self % 2 == 0) } } Dec 18 '17 at 6:56
  • 2
    Still shorter: extension Int { var isEven: Bool { return (self % 2 == 0) } } Oct 29 '18 at 9:54
  • 1
    :D stupidity. You mean to create isEven method as extension of Int type. But overall You've to check if it's odd or even. So You'll use if ... else... with isEven method. So where is shortening? In fact if You'll just once why do abstraction on primitives? What's gain?
    – num8er
    Oct 29 '18 at 10:39
12

Swift 5 adds the function isMultiple(of:) to the BinaryInteger protocol.

let even = binaryInteger.isMultiple(of: 2) 
let odd = !binaryInteger.isMultiple(of: 2)

This function can be used in place of % for odd/even checks.


This function was added via the Swift Evolution process:

Notably, isEven and isOdd were proposed but not accepted in the same review:

Given the addition of isMultiple(of:), the Core Team feels that isEven and isOdd offer no substantial advantages over isMultiple(of: 2).

Therefore, the proposal is accepted with modifications. isMultiple(of:) is accepted but isEven and isOdd are rejected.

If desired, those methods can be added easily through extension:

extension BinaryInteger {
    var isEven: Bool { isMultiple(of: 2) }
    var isOdd:  Bool { !isEven }
}
3

"Parity" is the name for the mathematical concept of Odd and Even:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parity_(mathematics)

You can extend the Swift BinaryInteger protocol to include a parity enumeration value:

enum Parity {
    case even, odd

    init<T>(_ integer: T) where T : BinaryInteger {
        self = integer.isMultiple(of: 2) ? .even : .odd
    }
}

extension BinaryInteger {
    var parity: Parity { Parity(self) }
}

which enables you to switch on an integer and elegantly handle the two cases:

switch 42.parity {
case .even:
    print("Even Number")
case .odd:
    print("Odd Number")
}
0

You can use filter method:

let numbers = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
let odd = numbers.filter { $0 % 2 == 1 }
let even = numbers.filter { $0 % 2 == 0 }

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