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I have an array of boolean variables and I want to return true if all the elements in this array are of the same value, false otherwise. I know I can loop through all the elements, but I'm wondering if there are any faster ways in C#.

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  • 3
    Any method you use boils down to checking every element; there's no way around that. Loop over the elements and return false if any element doesn't match the first one. Jun 5, 2014 at 13:15
  • imo prprcupofcoffee's approach is the fastest, exiting the loop makes it the fastest
    – Koryu
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:22

7 Answers 7

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var allAreTheSame = myArray.All(a => a) || myArray.All(a => !a)
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  • This is not faster than the solution proposed by the OP
    – dcastro
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:22
  • @dcastro If as soon as All hits a member that does not satisfy the predicate it stops iterating, so yes it is. Jun 5, 2014 at 13:24
  • Assuming his proposal didn't include that check - he was overly vague. But, fair enough.
    – dcastro
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:26
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var result = array.Distinct().Count() == 1;
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    @Ani a distinct on boolean values will never return more than 2 values.
    – MarkO
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:22
  • Er, yes. Brainfreeze.
    – Ani
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:34
  • @JimMischel - Distinct().Count() is 0 for an empty array so this will return false.
    – Lee
    Jun 5, 2014 at 14:03
  • @Lee I think determining if all elements are the same makes no sense on an array without elements. I think that situation should be handled by a seperate code path.
    – MarkO
    Jun 5, 2014 at 14:25
  • @MarkO - It does make sense and should return true, the same as Enumerable.All does on an empty collection. If it really is an error in this application it should throw an exception.
    – Lee
    Jun 5, 2014 at 14:52
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// Assuming the array is NOT empty
// Get first value
var firstValue = myArray.First();

// Check if all other values are identical
var allidentical = myArray.Skip(1).All(z => z == firstValue);
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  • Most efficient and you could just add a quick one time check at the beginning. Most of the other solutions loop over the array twice.
    – Nick Bray
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:26
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Enumerable.Range(0, array.Length-1).All(i => array[i] == array[i+1])

Edit: Fix after comments

Enumerable.Range(1, array.Length).All(i => array[i] == array[0])
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  • This throws an exception on an empty array.
    – Lee
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:18
  • True. Enumerable.Range(1, array.Length).All(i => array[i] == array[0]) then.
    – Dennis_E
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:21
  • That will still throw when you try to access index 0 of the array.
    – Lee
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:23
  • If the array is empty or has 1 element, the All(...) will not be evaluated
    – Dennis_E
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:28
  • If the array is empty, then Enumerable.Range will throw since the count is negative.
    – Lee
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:30
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var allAreTheSame = myArray.Distinct().Count() == 1

Just an alternative to David's approach, slightly shorter and possibly more efficient since I think the enumerator combination will cause the Array to be looped only once.

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I would go for an extension method. I'd always love those methods:

The class containing the extension method will be:

public static class ExtensionMethods
{
    public static bool AreAll<T>(this T[] source, Func<T, bool> condition)
    { return source.Where(condition).Count() == source.Count(); }

    public static bool AreAllTheSame<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
    { return source.Distinct().Count() == 1; }
}

You see that I have 2 extension methods, one taking a Func and one taking no parameter.

The first one is called when you want to check if all the elements in the array has the same value (for example, all elements are true, or all elements are false).

The second one is called, when you don't want to check against a specific parameter, but if you just want to see if all the values are the same.

And than a little demo to demonstrate the extension method itself:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        bool[] array = { true, false, true, false, true };
        bool[] trueArray = { true, true, true, true };

        Console.WriteLine("Searching with a predicate:");
        Console.WriteLine(array.AreAll(x => x).ToString());
        Console.WriteLine(array.AreAll(x => !x).ToString());
        Console.WriteLine(trueArray.AreAll(x => x).ToString());
        Console.WriteLine(trueArray.AreAll(x => !x).ToString());

        Console.WriteLine("Searching without a predicate:");
        Console.WriteLine(array.AreAllTheSame().ToString());
        Console.WriteLine(array.AreAllTheSame().ToString());
        Console.WriteLine(trueArray.AreAllTheSame().ToString());
        Console.WriteLine(trueArray.AreAllTheSame().ToString());

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

This will produce the following output:

enter image description here Let's hope it helps.

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  • That's just a less-general implementation of Enumerable.All and a re-implementation of Array.TrueForAll. This still doesn't help since you need the first value to use in the predicate.
    – Lee
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:24
  • Thanks for mentioning it.
    – Complexity
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:26
  • I've adapted the code and the example. Providing 2 functions right now that are working on an IEnumerable. One that takes a predicate, the other one that works without a predicate.
    – Complexity
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:32
  • Correct, there's no check on it.
    – Complexity
    Jun 5, 2014 at 13:40
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Just for fun a little different solution:

!(array.Any(b => b) && array.Any(b => !b));

There are two loops here. One of them should exit on the first element in the array. The other one should exit on the first occurrence that is different from the first in the array. It will also return true for empty arrays.

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