214

Just started with the playground. I'm trying to create a simple app.

I've created a date object like this:

var date = NSDate()

How can I get the current hour? In other languages I can do something like this:

var hour = date.hour

But I can't find any properties/methods like that. I've found a method, dateWithCalendarFormat. Should I use that? If so, HOW?

17 Answers 17

328

Update for Swift 3:

let date = Date()
let calendar = Calendar.current
let hour = calendar.component(.hour, from: date)
let minutes = calendar.component(.minute, from: date)

I do this:

let date = NSDate()
let calendar = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
let components = calendar.components(.CalendarUnitHour | .CalendarUnitMinute, fromDate: date)
let hour = components.hour
let minutes = components.minute

See the same question in objective-c How do I get hour and minutes from NSDate?

Compared to Nate’s answer, you’ll get numbers with this one, not strings… pick your choice!

  • Hello, thanks for answer, for example if minute is less than two character how can I return it with two characters like "04" – Yestay Muratov Jun 17 '15 at 6:49
  • 2
    @YestayMuratov This handy webpage tells has all possible ways of formatting a date using the NSDateFormatter in Swift :) codingexplorer.com/… – Max Jun 20 '15 at 8:09
  • 15
    It looks that the new Swift version (2) you have to use something similar to let components = calendar.components(.NSCalendarUnit.Year.union(NSCalendarUnit.Minute), fromDate: date), the vertical slash cant be used here anymore. – Hola Soy Edu Feliz Navidad Jun 24 '15 at 19:09
  • 5
    let components = calendar.components(NSCalendarUnit.Year.union(NSCalendarUnit.Minute), fromDate: date) removed the extra '.' before NSCalendarUnit – cakes88 Oct 15 '15 at 16:09
  • 45
    Swift 2.1: let components = calendar.components([ .Hour, .Minute, .Second], fromDate: date) – obiwahn Dec 11 '15 at 10:29
147

Tested with Swift 4

Getting the Current Date and Time

You can get the current date and time as simply as this:

let currentDateTime = Date()

However, Date is a 64-bit floating point number measuring the number of seconds since the reference date of January 1, 2001 at 00:00:00 UTC. I can see that number for the current datetime by using

Date().timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate

At the time of this writing, it returned 497626515.185066, probably not exactly what you are looking for. Keep reading.

Creating Another Date and Time

Method 1

If you know the number of seconds before or after the reference date, you can use that.

let someOtherDateTime = Date(timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate: -123456789.0) // Feb 2, 1997, 10:26 AM

Method 2

Of course, it would be easier to use things like years, months, days and hours (rather than relative seconds) to make a Date. For this you can use DateComponents to specify the components and then Calendar to create the date. The Calendar gives the Date context. Otherwise, how would it know what time zone or calendar to express it in?

// Specify date components
var dateComponents = DateComponents()
dateComponents.year = 1980
dateComponents.month = 7
dateComponents.day = 11
dateComponents.timeZone = TimeZone(abbreviation: "JST") // Japan Standard Time
dateComponents.hour = 8
dateComponents.minute = 34

// Create date from components
let userCalendar = Calendar.current // user calendar
let someDateTime = userCalendar.date(from: dateComponents)

Other time zone abbreviations can be found here. If you leave that blank, then the default is to use the user's time zone.

Method 3

The most succinct way (but not necessarily the best) could be to use DateFormatter.

let formatter = DateFormatter()
formatter.dateFormat = "yyyy/MM/dd HH:mm"
let someDateTime = formatter.date(from: "2016/10/08 22:31")

The Unicode technical standards show other formats that DateFormatter supports.

Displaying the Date and Time

Method 1

If you want to just display certain components of the date or time you can use CalendarUnit to specify the components that you want to extract from Date.

// get the current date and time
let currentDateTime = Date()

// get the user's calendar
let userCalendar = Calendar.current

// choose which date and time components are needed
let requestedComponents: Set<Calendar.Component> = [
    .year,
    .month,
    .day,
    .hour,
    .minute,
    .second
]

// get the components
let dateTimeComponents = userCalendar.dateComponents(requestedComponents, from: currentDateTime)

// now the components are available
dateTimeComponents.year   // 2016
dateTimeComponents.month  // 10
dateTimeComponents.day    // 8
dateTimeComponents.hour   // 22
dateTimeComponents.minute // 42
dateTimeComponents.second // 17

See this answer also.

Method 2

Method 1 gave you the components, but it would be a lot of work to format those numbers for every style, language, and region. And you don't need to. This has already been done for you with the DateFormatter class.

// get the current date and time
let currentDateTime = Date()

// initialize the date formatter and set the style
let formatter = DateFormatter()
formatter.timeStyle = .medium
formatter.dateStyle = .long

// get the date time String from the date object
formatter.string(from: currentDateTime) // October 8, 2016 at 10:48:53 PM

Here is a continuation of the above code that shows more formatting options:

// "10/8/16, 10:52 PM"
formatter.timeStyle = .short
formatter.dateStyle = .short
formatter.string(from: currentDateTime)

// "Oct 8, 2016, 10:52:30 PM"
formatter.timeStyle = .medium
formatter.dateStyle = .medium
formatter.string(from: currentDateTime)

// "October 8, 2016 at 10:52:30 PM GMT+8"
formatter.timeStyle = .long
formatter.dateStyle = .long
formatter.string(from: currentDateTime)

// "October 8, 2016"
formatter.timeStyle = .none
formatter.dateStyle = .long
formatter.string(from: currentDateTime)

// "10:52:30 PM"
formatter.timeStyle = .medium
formatter.dateStyle = .none
formatter.string(from: currentDateTime)

Keep in mind, though, that this is for English with the region set to the US. For other languages and regions the formatting will look different.

Further study

52

You could also use NSDateFormatter's convenience method, e.g.,

func printTimestamp() {
  let timestamp = NSDateFormatter.localizedStringFromDate(NSDate(), dateStyle: .MediumStyle, timeStyle: .ShortStyle)
  print(timestamp)
}
printTimestamp() // Prints "Sep 9, 2014, 4:30 AM"
  • 1
    Creating an NSDateFormatter is expensive. You should create on and reuse it. – Rog Mar 23 '16 at 13:24
  • 2
    Swift 3: let timestamp = DateFormatter.localizedString(from: Date(), dateStyle: .short, timeStyle: .short) – Brian Feb 23 '17 at 23:13
49

Swift makes it really easy to create and use extensions. I create a sharedCode.swift file and put enums, extensions, and other fun stuff in it. I created a NSDate extension to add some typical functionality which is laborious and ugly to type over and over again:

extension NSDate
{
    func hour() -> Int
    {
        //Get Hour
        let calendar = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
        let components = calendar.components(.Hour, fromDate: self)
        let hour = components.hour

        //Return Hour
        return hour
    }


    func minute() -> Int
    {
        //Get Minute
        let calendar = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
        let components = calendar.components(.Minute, fromDate: self)
        let minute = components.minute

        //Return Minute
        return minute
    }

    func toShortTimeString() -> String
    {
        //Get Short Time String
        let formatter = NSDateFormatter()
        formatter.timeStyle = .ShortStyle
        let timeString = formatter.stringFromDate(self)

        //Return Short Time String
        return timeString
    }
}

using this extension you can now do something like:

        //Get Current Date
        let currentDate = NSDate()

        //Test Extensions in Log
        NSLog("(Current Hour = \(currentDate.hour())) (Current Minute = \(currentDate.minute())) (Current Short Time String = \(currentDate.toShortTimeString()))")

Which for 11:51 AM would write out:

(Current Hour = 11) (Current Minute = 51) (Current Short Time String = 11:51 AM)

26

Swift 2 answer :

 let date = NSDate()
 let calendar = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
 let components = calendar.components([.Hour, .Minute], fromDate: date)
 let hour = components.hour
 let minutes = components.minute
13

Swift 4

        let dateFormatter : DateFormatter = DateFormatter()
//        dateFormatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss"
         dateFormatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MMM-dd HH:mm:ss"
        let date = Date()
        let dateString = dateFormatter.string(from: date)
        let interval = date.timeIntervalSince1970

OUTPUT

2018-May-01 10:41:31

11

Swift 3:

static func currentTime() -> String {
    let date = Date()
    let calendar = Calendar.current
    let hour = calendar.component(.hour, from: date)
    let minutes = calendar.component(.minute, from: date)
    return "\(hour):\(minutes)"
  }

PS - not sure what the question means exactly by getting current time (and hour) as date time, but hopefully the above should explain enough to answer the question.

  • SaRaVaNaN DM's answer above had an extra '()' at the end of Calendar.current. – Charlie Seligman Oct 3 '16 at 9:47
7

if you just need the hour of the day

let calendar = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
var hour = calendar.component(.Hour,fromDate: NSDate())
7

With Swift 3 and Swift 4, Foundation offers many ways to the hour value from a Date object. According to your needs, you may choose one of the four following Playground code snippets.


#1. Using Calendar dateComponents(_:from:) method

Calendar has a method called dateComponents(_:from:). dateComponents(_:from:) has the following declaration:

func dateComponents(_ components: Set<Calendar.Component>, from date: Date) -> DateComponents

Returns all the date components of a date, using the calendar time zone.

Usage:

import Foundation

let date = Date()
let dateComponents = Calendar.current.dateComponents([.hour], from: date)
let hour = dateComponents.hour
print(String(describing: hour)) // may print: Optional(13)

#2. Using Calendar component(_:from:) method

Calendar has a method called component(_:from:). component(_:from:) has the following declaration:

Returns the value for one component of a date.

func component(_ component: Calendar.Component, from date: Date) -> Int

Usage:

import Foundation

let date = Date()
let hour = Calendar.current.component(.hour, from: date)
print(hour) // may print: 13

#3. Using DateFormatter dateFormat property

DateFormatter has a property called dateFormat. dateFormat has the following declaration:

var dateFormat: String! { get set }

The date format string used by the receiver.

Usage:

import Foundation

let date = Date()
let dateFormatter = DateFormatter()
dateFormatter.dateFormat = "HH"
let hour = dateFormatter.string(from: date)
print(hour) // may print: 13

#4. Using Dateformatter setLocalizedDateFormatFromTemplate(_:) method

Dateformatter has a method called setLocalizedDateFormatFromTemplate(_:). setLocalizedDateFormatFromTemplate(_:) has the following declaration:

func setLocalizedDateFormatFromTemplate(_ dateFormatTemplate: String)

Sets the date format from a template using the specified locale for the receiver.

Usage:

import Foundation

let date = Date()
let dateFormatter = DateFormatter()
dateFormatter.setLocalizedDateFormatFromTemplate("HH")
let hour = dateFormatter.string(from: date)
print(hour) // may print: 13
6

In Swift 3,

    let date = Date()
    let calendar = Calendar.current()

    let hour = calendar.component(.hour, from: date)
  • let calendar = Calendar.current; let unitFlags: Set<Calendar.Component> = Set<Calendar.Component ([.hour]); let components = calendar.dateComponents(unitFlags, from: self) – AbdulMomen عبدالمؤمن Oct 4 '16 at 8:09
6

Using Date Formatter -Swift 3.0

//Date
let dateFormatter = DateFormatter()
dateFormatter.dateStyle = .medium
let dateString = "Current date is: \(dateFormatter.string(from: Date() as Date))"
labelfordate.text = String(dateString)


//Time    
let timeFormatter = DateFormatter()
timeFormatter.timeStyle = .medium
let timeString = "Current time is: \(timeFormatter.string(from: Date() as Date))"
labelfortime.text = String(timeString)

Update Date and Time Every Seconds

override func viewDidLoad() {
super.viewDidLoad()

timer = Timer.scheduledTimer(timeInterval: 1, target: self, selector: #selector(DateAndTime.action), userInfo: nil, repeats: true)

       }

func action()
    {
    //Date
    let dateFormatter = DateFormatter()
    dateFormatter.dateStyle = .medium
    let dateString = "Current date is: \(dateFormatter.string(from: Date() as Date))"
    labelfordate.text = String(dateString)


    //Time
    let timeFormatter = DateFormatter()
    timeFormatter.timeStyle = .medium
    let timeString = "Current time is: \(timeFormatter.string(from: Date() as Date))"
    labelfortime.text = String(timeString)

    }

Note: DateAndTime in the Timer code is the Class name.

  • thanks, its working – Farsheel Aug 28 '18 at 9:57
5

I know there are a lot of answers but I think that mine may be more convenient to many

extension String {
    init(epoch: Double) {
        let date = Date(timeIntervalSince1970: epoch)

        let dateFormatter = DateFormatter()
        dateFormatter.dateFormat = "dd/MM/yyyy HH:mm:ssZZZ"

        self = dateFormatter.string(from: date)
    }
}
3

You can try this

func getTime() -> (hour:Int, min:Int, sec:Int) {
        let currentDateTime = NSDate()
        let calendar = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
        let components = calendar.components([.Hour,.Minute,.Second], fromDate: currentDateTime)
        let hour = components.hour
        let min = components.minute
        let sec = components.second
        return (hour,min,sec)
    }

Now call that method and receive the date with hour,min and second

    let currentTime = self.getTime()
    print("Hour: \(currentTime.hour) Min: \(currentTime.min) Sec: \(currentTime.sec))")
2

for only date in specific format

    let dateFormatter1 = NSDateFormatter()
    dateFormatter1.dateStyle = .MediumStyle
    dateFormatter1.timeStyle = .NoStyle
    dateFormatter1.dateFormat = "dd-MM-yyyy"
    let date = dateFormatter1.stringFromDate(NSDate())
  • Just a note, when using NSDateFormatter, these are expensive objects to create so you may want to use a lazy getter to re-use the same NSDateFormatter if you are using this code in a table or collection or something. The styles and format can be changed trivially where needed without impacting performance as much as re-creating these where ever they are needed. Cheers.! – jcpennypincher Nov 22 '17 at 0:17
2

Xcode 8.2.1 • Swift 3.0.2

extension Date {
    var hour: Int { return Calendar.autoupdatingCurrent.component(.hour, from: self) }
}

let date = Date()      // "Mar 16, 2017, 3:43 PM"
let hour = date.hour   // 15
1

You can create an extension on Date, that way you can easily call it in other files. Here is an example of a date extension that uses a computed property.

It will print it out: "Today, 4:55 PM"

extension Date {

    var formatter: DateFormatter? {
        let formatter = DateFormatter()
        formatter.dateStyle = .short
        formatter.timeStyle = .short
        formatter.doesRelativeDateFormatting = true

        return formatter
    }
}
0

You can get from Dateformatter

let dateFormatter = DateFormatter()
dateFormatter.dateFormat = "dd/MM/yyyy"
let dateString = dateFormatter.string(from:Date())
print(dateString)

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