157

How can I deal with this error without creating additional variable?

func reduceToZero(x:Int) -> Int {
    while (x != 0) {
        x = x-1            // ERROR: cannot assign to 'let' value 'x'
    }
    return x
}

I don't want to create additional variable just to store the value of x. Is it even possible to do what I want?

1
  • 4
    See the updated answers below, Swift 3 has deprecated your accepted answer.
    – esreli
    May 3, 2016 at 0:43

7 Answers 7

239

As stated in other answers, as of Swift 3 placing var before a variable has been deprecated. Though not stated in other answers is the ability to declare an inout parameter. Think: passing in a pointer.

func reduceToZero(_ x: inout Int) {
    while (x != 0) {
        x = x-1     
    }
}

var a = 3
reduceToZero(&a)
print(a) // will print '0'

This can be particularly useful in recursion.

Apple's inout declaration guidelines can be found here.

8
  • 2
    Thank you very much!!!! I am stuck here on a recursion question. You saved my life.
    – JW.ZG
    Jul 19, 2016 at 21:49
  • 2
    Should use this with caution as this modifies variables outside function scope. Ideally you want to explicitly return the value you changed inside the function. Aug 14, 2016 at 8:50
  • 2
    inout keyword should be placed between parameter name and parameter type like this: func reduceToZero(x: inout Int) in current Swift 3 version. Sep 24, 2016 at 8:59
  • Except this doesn't seem to work for closures since closures evidently only capture inout parameters by value (at least that is the error message Xcode gives me). I use @GeRyCh solution in this case.
    – wcochran
    Apr 14, 2017 at 16:03
  • Thank you. This worked for now, but its like using pointers in C. Would this survive another Swift version? Jul 26, 2017 at 12:44
53

'var' parameters are deprecated and will be removed in Swift 3. So assigning to a new parameter seems like the best way now:

func reduceToZero(x:Int) -> Int {
    var x = x
    while (x != 0) {
        x = x-1            
    }
    return x
}

as mentioned here: 'var' parameters are deprecated and will be removed in Swift 3

5
  • 1
    In this case, does it actually copy the x in the the new var x? Or is Swift doing something more efficient than that?
    – Genki
    Feb 10, 2017 at 20:58
  • 3
    This works and is what I do, but it seems very awkward.
    – wcochran
    Apr 14, 2017 at 15:40
  • 2
    @Gomfucius Not a word about this in the Swift 3.1 guide. In this case (x fits in register) there is virtually no cost. If x is array, struct, or object that is mutated, then a copy almost certainly needs to be performed (unless the optimizer can analyze it inline and alias it).
    – wcochran
    Apr 14, 2017 at 16:00
  • 2
    @wcochran This is a neat trick, but really there's nothing special going on. It's simply eclipsing an input parameter with a local var copy. In the OP's situation it is a better replacement for var args than using inout which may have unintended side-effects, esp. if the var was a pointer.
    – Echelon
    Jun 23, 2017 at 17:05
  • So should we use this method or the inout method? Jul 10, 2021 at 19:53
45

For Swift 1 and 2 (for Swift 3 see answer by achi using an inout parameter): Argument of a function in Swift is let by default so change it to var if you need to alter the value i.e,

func reduceToZero(var x:Int) -> Int {
    while (x != 0) {
        x = x-1     
    }
    return x
}
5
  • 2
    Why is this answer up-voted like hell? The other answer was placed before this one, and contains more information than this one.
    – Cristik
    Dec 15, 2015 at 21:48
  • 18
    /!\ Using var will create a copy of the variable passed in parameters. So modifying it won't modify the original value. Also var in parameters is very likely to disappear in newer Swift versions per github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/master/proposals/… Dec 17, 2015 at 17:04
  • 18
    var keyword in method paremeter will be deprecated in Swift 3.
    – Boon
    May 15, 2016 at 15:20
  • 4
    I think with Swift 3, we won't be able to do this anymore. We'll have to create a variable copy of the array and return that modified array.
    – C0D3
    May 18, 2016 at 16:40
  • This answer is the correct answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/24077880/…
    – esreli
    Oct 28, 2016 at 3:29
18

Swift3 answer for passing mutable array pointer.

Function:

func foo(array: inout Array<Int>) {
    array.append(1)
}

Call to function:

var a = Array<Int>()
foo(array:&a)
1
  • Honestly, I'm not sure if this is correct as the Swift ground is ever-changing. I thought this better than doing var array = array inside the function because that makes a copy (and doesn't actually affect the original array structure)? Is a better design approach to aforementioned var approach and then return the new mutated array?
    – joshd
    Jul 31, 2016 at 6:57
7

In Swift you just add the var keyword before the variable name in the function declaration:

func reduceToZero(var x:Int) -> Int { // notice the "var" keyword
    while (x != 0) {
        x = x-1            
    }
    return x
}

Refer to the subsection "Constant and Variable Parameters" in the "Functions" chapter of the Swift book (page 210 of the iBook as it is today).

2
  • 7
    'var' parameters are deprecated and will be removed in Swift 3 May 19, 2016 at 18:40
  • 3
    Not valid for Swift 4 and newer.
    – ilkayaktas
    Nov 18, 2018 at 14:26
6

There are some cases where we dont ned to use inout

We can use something like this if you want that changes/scope to be only inside the function:

func manipulateData(a: Int) -> Int {
    var a = a
    // ...
}
0

Solution using Swift5 with Functional Programming...

func reduceToZeroFP(x:Int) -> Int {
    x == 0 ? x : reduceToZeroFP(x: x - 1)
}

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