30

Recently, I faced the below question in an interview. Initially I thought that the question was wrong, but the interviewer mentioned there is a solution for this. Given this class:

public class BaseHome
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("A");
    }
}

Write the following to the console:

B
A
C

Rules:

  1. Do not change the Main function.
  2. Do not create any additional classes.

How can this be done?

  • 4
    @ken2k I saw that too. So the solution could be to just create a Main method – Dennis_E Jun 6 '14 at 9:12
  • 6
    not allowed to type anything on the keyboard or move the mouse – Weyland Yutani Jun 6 '14 at 9:14
  • 2
    As this is not a program, I assume B and C are ouput from the program which call BaseHome.main to supply the A – Peter Smith Jun 6 '14 at 9:15
  • 10
    This is really a question for CodeGolf.SE. – Sam Axe Jun 6 '14 at 9:26
  • 3
    Agreed, this question is a much better fit for CodeGolf – dav_i Jun 6 '14 at 10:33
49

Assuming you meant B A C on three lines (plus no typo on main method name):

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    public class BaseHome
    {
        static BaseHome()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("B");

            AppDomain.CurrentDomain.ProcessExit += new EventHandler(OnProcessExit);
        }

        public static void Main()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("A");
        }

        private static void OnProcessExit(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("C");
            Console.Read();
        }
    }
}
  • 2
    Yep, I think that is solution. I was thinking about timer, but this is better solution – Sergey Berezovskiy Jun 6 '14 at 9:22
  • 4
    +1 Well done. This works as required. – Adriaan Stander Jun 6 '14 at 9:25
  • 4
    +1 Amazing. I couldn't even think of ProcessExit! – Abhitalks Jun 6 '14 at 9:27
  • What is this static BaseHome()-method? Is this a constructor? – チーズパン Jun 6 '14 at 9:34
  • 2
    @bodycountPP Ref. Static Constructors: "A static constructor is used to initialize any static data, or to perform a particular action that needs to be performed once only. It is called automatically before the first instance is created or any static members are referenced." – user2864740 Jun 6 '14 at 9:36
25

Hahaha, I figured it out. Create a static property!

public class BaseHome
{
    public static void Main()
    {
       Console.WriteLine("A");
    }

    public static BaseHome Console
    {
        get{ return new BaseHome(); }
    }

    public void WriteLine(string s) {
        System.Console.WriteLine("BCA"); //Or multiple lines if you like
    }

}

Edit: Or, duh, just a field

public class BaseHome
{
    static BaseHome Console = new BaseHome();

    public static void Main()
    {
       Console.WriteLine("A");
    }

    public void WriteLine(string s) {
        System.Console.WriteLine("BCA"); //Or multiple lines if you like
    }

}
  • 1
    That's pretty neat imo. – AndreySarafanov Jun 6 '14 at 9:56
  • 4
    Clever answer. I like this because it indicates that you pay attention to details. The BaseHome console program/class could easily be static (and, at least in my experience, it usually is static, or at least not treated like an instantiable class). This takes advantage of that detail and wouldn't work otherwise. – Chris Sinclair Jun 6 '14 at 10:40
  • 1
    If the class were static, you can make a property that returns an anonymous type, but I don't know if that violates the do-not-create-a-class constraint: public static dynamic Console { get { Action<string> WriteLine = s => System.Console.WriteLine("BCA"); return new { WriteLine }; } } – Dennis_E Jun 6 '14 at 11:20
  • 1
    @Dennis_E: Good thinking. If anonymous types aren't allowed (which seems quite plausible) you can use an ExpandoObject instead! – Chris Sinclair Jun 6 '14 at 16:25
  • This is why C# is my favorite language; so many beautiful features! – Dennis_E Jun 6 '14 at 16:48
17

No new types. No objects explicitly created. Works in a real Console application.

public class BaseHome
{
    static System.IO.TextWriter Console
    {
        get
        {
            System.Console.Write("  C\rB");
            return System.Console.Out;
        }
    }
    public static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("A");
        // System.Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Result is BAC - on the same line no less!

(This can be adapted to multiple line output, per the post edit, with the use of CurstorLeft/Top or direct escape sequences.)


Explanation:

The static property (Console) is resolved instead of the type in Console.WriteLine("A") as the property shadows the type here; this is why System.Console is used to refer to the Console class itself.

The Console get-property causes a side-effect of writing to the console - it writes "__C" then uses CR (Carriage Return) to "return to the line start" and writes "B" so the line is "B_C", leaving the cursor after the "B".

The property then returns the TextWriter associated with the console which has WriteLine. The TextWriter's WriteLine, not Console's static WriteLine, is then invoked and the character "A" is written (after "B") so the result is "BAC".

This utilizes context-specific behavior because it is the console which understands how to move the cursor (e.g. with "\r" or other cursor positioning).

  • 1
    That's pretty clever! – Ronan Thibaudau Jun 6 '14 at 9:28
  • That's quite sneaky. You could also just redirect the Console's output stream in a static constructor. See my answer. – Mike Zboray Jun 6 '14 at 9:44
  • Explanation, I demand one! – チーズパン Jun 6 '14 at 12:47
  • 1
    @bodycountPP Wish granted. – user2864740 Jun 6 '14 at 19:09
13

Just a static constructor is needed:

public class BaseHome
{
    static BaseHome()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("B\nA\nC");
        Console.SetOut(System.IO.TextWriter.Null);
    }

    public static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("A");
    }
}

Instead of redirecting the output stream, other options include calling Environment.Exit, throwing an unhandled exception, or just spinning forever. It is unclear if the program is required to terminate normally (or at all).

  • 1
    Clever to simply "disconnect" the output. – user2864740 Jun 6 '14 at 19:22
5
struct ConsoleStruct
{
    private string _text;
    public ConsoleStruct(string text)
    {
        _text = text;
    }

    public void WriteLine(string txt)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(_text);
    }
}
class Program
{
    private static ConsoleStruct Console = new ConsoleStruct("B A C");
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("A");
    }
}
  • Easy to fix by just making WriteLine in the struct take an argument that it ignores. – Chris Jun 6 '14 at 9:22
  • @JanneMatikainen yeah, fixed it. Still a much worse solution than ken2k's – AndreySarafanov Jun 6 '14 at 9:24
  • 3
    Should not create any additional class implied no structs too imho in this context – Ronan Thibaudau Jun 6 '14 at 9:27

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