1

I have multiple methods inside a Parallel.Invoke() that need to run inside of a transaction. These methods all invoke instances of SqlBulkCopy The use-case is "all-or-none", so if one method fails nothing gets committed. I am getting a TransactionAbortedException ({"Transaction Timeout"}) when I call the Complete() method on the parent transaction.

This is the parent transaction:

using (var ts = new TransactionScope())
{
    var saveClone = Transaction.Current.DependentClone(DependentCloneOption.BlockCommitUntilComplete);
    var saveErrorsClone = Transaction.Current.DependentClone(DependentCloneOption.BlockCommitUntilComplete);
    var saveADClone = Transaction.Current.DependentClone(DependentCloneOption.BlockCommitUntilComplete);
    var saveEnrollmentsClone = Transaction.Current.DependentClone(DependentCloneOption.BlockCommitUntilComplete);
    Parallel.Invoke(_options, () =>
        {
            Save(data, saveClone);
        },
        () =>
        {
            SaveErrors(saveErrorsClone);
        },
        () =>
        {
            SaveEnrollments(data, saveEnrollmentsClone);
        });
ts.Complete();  
}//***** GET THE EXCEPTION HERE *****

Here's a dependent transaction that makes use of SqlBulkCopy (they're all the same structure). I'm passing-in the parent and assigning it to the child's TransactionScope

private void Save(IDictionary<string, string> data, Transaction transaction)
{
    var dTs = (DependentTransaction)transaction;
    if (transaction.TransactionInformation.Status != TransactionStatus.Aborted)
    {
        using (var ts = new TransactionScope(dTs))
        {
            _walmartData.Save(data);
            Debug.WriteLine("Completed Processing XML - {0}", _stopWatch.Elapsed);
            ts.Complete();
        }
    }
    else
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("Save Not Executed - Transaction Aborted - {0}", _stopWatch.Elapsed);    
        dTs.Complete();
    }
    dTs.Complete();
}

EDIT (added my SqlBulkCopy method...notice null for the transaction param)

private void SqlBulkCopy(DataTable dt, SqlBulkCopyColumnMappingCollection mappings)
{
    try
    {
        using (var sbc = new SqlBulkCopy(_conn, SqlBulkCopyOptions.TableLock, null))
        {
            sbc.BatchSize = 100;
            sbc.BulkCopyTimeout = 0;
            sbc.DestinationTableName = dt.TableName;
            foreach (SqlBulkCopyColumnMapping mapping in mappings)
            {
                sbc.ColumnMappings.Add(mapping);
            }
            sbc.WriteToServer(dt);
        }
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        throw;
    }
}

Besides fixing the error, I'm open to alternatives. Thanks.

  • Your parallel invoke is sequential... – usr Jun 6 '14 at 17:33
  • @usr...Thanks, I updated the code. – Big Daddy Jun 6 '14 at 17:46
2

You're creating a form of deadlock with your choice of DependentCloneOption.BlockCommitUntilComplete.

Parallel.Invoke blocks the calling thread until all of its processing is complete. The jobs trying to be completed by Parallel.Invoke are all blocking while waiting for the parent transaction to complete (due to the DependentCloneOption). So the 2 are waiting on each other... deadlock. The parent transaction eventually times out and releases the dependent transactions from blocking, which unblocks your calling thread.

Can you use DependentCloneOption.RollbackIfNotComplete ?

| improve this answer | |
  • I made this change, but still get the error. I didn't mention in my original post that all the methods inside the Invoke are using SqlBulkCopy. Maybe this is the reason for the timeout? – Big Daddy Jun 9 '14 at 14:50
  • @BigDaddy Ahh, try running the code without the sqlbulkcopy. If everything works, the bulk copy is the problem. – Kenneth Ito Jun 9 '14 at 15:44
  • @BigDaddy Just saw the edit to the question listed out your SqlBulkCopy code. You are holding a TableLock and not enlisting in the transaction. Can you post more complete code... I'm not sure how you are calling into SqlBulkCopy but it looks flawed to me. You are using Parallel Invoke, but if each thread is sql bulk copying to the same table with table locks... it may not be what you intend. Also, since you are passing in null for the transaction, the bulk copy probably isn't taking part in the transactions scope. – Kenneth Ito Jun 9 '14 at 16:30
  • Each thread is bulk copying to a different table, so I don't think that's a problem. However, there's some sort of disconnect between the TransactionScope and the SqlBulkCopy. – Big Daddy Jun 10 '14 at 15:44
  • @BigDaddy Can you try shrinking the workload of the bulk copy? Or extending the length of the transaction timeout? It's possible that this is simply the workload execution time exceeding the transaction time. – Kenneth Ito Jun 10 '14 at 18:27
0

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.transactions.transactionscope.complete.aspx says that TransactionScope.Complete only commits the transaction it contains if it was the one that created it. Since you are creating the scope from an existing transaction I believe you will need to commit the transaction before calling complete on the scope.

From MSDN:

The actual work of commit between the resources manager happens at the End Using statement if the TransactionScope object created the transaction. If it did not create the transaction, the commit occurs whenever Commit is called by the owner of the CommittableTransaction object. At that point the Transaction Manager calls the resource managers and informs them to either commit or rollback, based on whether this method was called on the TransactionScope object

.

| improve this answer | |
  • It looks like I'm doing this. I call Complete() on the parent Transaction and all the dependent ones. Am I mistaken? – Big Daddy Jun 6 '14 at 15:31
0

After a lot of pain, research, and lack of a valid answer, I've got to believe that it's not possible with the stack that I described in my question. The pain-point, I believe, is between TransactionScope and SqlBulkCopy. I put this answer here for the benefit of future viewers. If someone can prove that it can be done, I'll gladly remove this as the answer.

| improve this answer | |
0

I believe that how you create your _conn-instance matters a lot, if you create it and open it within your TransactionScope-instance any SqlBulkCopy-related issues should be solved.

Have a look at Can I use SqlBulkCopy inside Transaction and Is it possible to use System.Transactions.TransactionScope with SqlBulkCopy? and see if it helps you.

void MyMainMethod()
{
 using (var ts = new TransactionScope())
 {
  Parallell.InvokeOrWhatNotOrWhatEver(() => DoStuff());
 }
}

void DoStuff() 
{
 using (var sqlCon = new SqlConnection(conStr))
 {
  sqlCon.Open(); // ensure to open it before SqlBulkCopy can open it in another transactionscope.
  using (var bulk = new SqlBulkCopy(sqlCon))
  {
    // Do you stuff
    bulk.WriteToServer...
  }      

  ts.Complete(); // finish the transaction, ie commit
 }
}

In short:

  1. Create transaction scope
  2. Create sql-connection and open it under the transaction scope
  3. Create and use SqlBulkCopy-instance with above created conncection
  4. Call transaction.Complete()
  5. Dispose of everything :-)
| improve this answer | |
  • It's been while, so bear with me. If I did what you suggest, I'd need to create a new connection in every child method. Is the TransactionScope going to manage multiple connections? – Big Daddy Oct 27 '15 at 11:31
  • The way I understand it yes, but you'd have to try yourself :-) (it is really dependent on the connection implementation being good enough). – flindeberg Oct 27 '15 at 17:33

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