18

Basically I am mixing EF with one call to a stored procedure which does some batch deletions, otherwise EF is too slow.

Here is some pseudo-code of this scenario (I have more complex code in reality):

public void RemoveCustomer(int customerUID)
{
   // this code is running in one db transaction
   {
      // retrieve certain orders of particular customer using EF
      var orders = repoOrders.GetOrdersOfCustomer(filter, customerUID);

      // do something with above orders before deletion using EF
      repoX.DoSomethingWithOrders(orders);

      // call SP to delete all orders of customer 
      repoOrders.DeleteAllOrdersOfCustomer(customerUID);  // this calls a stored procedure

      // delete customer using EF 
      repoCustomers.DeleteCustomer(customerUID);  // throws exception due to relationship!
   }
}

of course, customers-orders is one-to-many (1:m) relation.

I want to avoid in the above scenario the exception which is thrown when there will be some orders loaded by the context belonging to the customer that gets deleted. Exception is:

"The relationship could not be changed because one or more of the foreign-key properties is non-nullable. When a change is made to a relationship, the related foreign-key property is set to a null value. If the foreign-key does not support null values, a new relationship must be defined, the foreign-key property must be assigned another non-null value, or the unrelated object must be deleted."

So, I want to know if is possible to clear some/all orders from <DbSet>.Local without causing any change into the database after calling the stored procedure and before user gets deleted.

I guess Detach could be used, but this means I should loop through.

What would you recommend?

Edit: I am new to EF and I am integrating EF now after the repositories were done using ADO.NET, and yes, the BL has been kept the same... so I try this integration with minimal efforts at this point.

Note: I can't make changes on the database structure.

13
  • 1
    Out of curiosity, why does it matter? Data contexts are designed to be short lived, you should delete them after every transaction and create a new one. This is especially critical if it's a web application, since a shared dbcontext will corrupt data. Commented Jun 6, 2014 at 17:17
  • @ErikFunkenbusch: To answer to your question, my entire RemoveCustomer is one transaction. I cannot DeleteCustomer if DeleteAllOrdersOfCustomers fails, right? Will edit my question to make it more clear
    – Learner
    Commented Jun 7, 2014 at 16:56
  • 1
    I don't understand what you mean... You're throwing away any chance of a generic solution when you call a stored procedure to do specific things anyways. Your question makes no mention of "generic solutions" Commented Jun 7, 2014 at 17:08
  • 1
    You should also understand that Local is not the internal cache.. it's just a list of items that are in the internal cache (for instance, unsaved deleted items do not show up in Local, but are still in the internal cache) Commented Jun 7, 2014 at 17:21
  • 1
    Look, the simple answer is that there is no facility in Entity Framework to remove items from the cache without performing associated SQL operations. If you use Local.Clear() or Local.Remove(), internally it just moves those items to the "Deleted" state and issues delete queries when you call save changes. The only supported way to clear the cache is to delete the context. Your only other option is to walk the DbSet and Detach each item. Commented Jun 7, 2014 at 17:38

4 Answers 4

19

This feature is available starting with Entity Framework Core 5!

To make the DbContext stop tracking all currently tracked entities:

myDbContext.ChangeTracker.Clear();
7

I'd personally make each repository method use its own context, save its own changes at the end of the method, etc., and then use a TransactionScope to ensure that the operations are atomic.

void DeleteAllOrdersOfCustomer(Guid customerUID)
{
    using (var context = new Context())
    {
       ...
       context.SaveChanges();
    }
}

...

using (var ts = new TransactionScope())
{
   // call SP to delete all orders of customer 
   repoOrders.DeleteAllOrdersOfCustomer(customerUID);  // this calls a stored procedure

   // delete customer using EF 
   repoCustomers.DeleteCustomer(customerUID);  // throws exception due to relationship!
   ts.Complete();
}
5
  • Understand what you mean, unfortunately I won't use TransactionScope because I am afraid of DTS and I have to provide MSSQL & Oracle support. Is there any other choice?
    – Learner
    Commented Jun 7, 2014 at 17:20
  • @Cristi: I only recommended TransactionScope because you said "without causing any change into the database after calling the stored procedure and before user gets deleted." Transactions are the only way to ensure this. If you're willing to accept the possibility of changes happening (on other threads) between these two operations, then simply follow the rest of my advice: keep your contexts lifespans shorter, and you won't run into issues where values are cached. Oh, and Aron: Chillax, bro. :-) Commented Jun 7, 2014 at 17:23
  • Starting from EF6 yes. DbContext.Database.BeginTransaction()
    – Aron
    Commented Jun 7, 2014 at 17:25
  • Yes, DbContext.Database.BeginTransaction() is what I am using here... but this means I have only one, shared, context.
    – Learner
    Commented Jun 7, 2014 at 17:26
  • @Aron, I still prefer well known 'surprises' of an open source framework than the surprises that an expert team already solved. But Microsofts apis/too much architecture protection/lack of extensibility stills sucks Commented Apr 11, 2015 at 2:16
2

Refresh should do the trick

It can be a little tricky and I don't know how expensive it is to use. You will need to use the RefreshMode Enum and I assume you want StoreWins.

BTW you might be able to speed up your EF delete, instead of the batch, but that is for a different question.

4
  • -1 Admiral Adama. I am pretty sure that RefreshMode cannot be used with deleted items, which is what the OP is asking for. Even if it could, you would literally have to download the entire table for it to work.
    – Aron
    Commented Jun 7, 2014 at 17:17
  • @Aron I was under the impression these were children objects but i could be off. I doubt it would d/l the entire table since the key would still be in the cache. Commented Jun 8, 2014 at 17:32
  • Oh wait...didn't see the Refresh method...hmm...you would then have to tight loop over each object...can you say epic slow?
    – Aron
    Commented Jun 8, 2014 at 17:33
  • @Aron could be. I was just putting it out there. Depending on the application scenario it might be of use. Commented Jun 8, 2014 at 17:35
1

I have been using SqlQuery from dbset for this purpose, this way:

context.xdbset.SqlQuery("storedprocedure; select * from xdbset");  

The query calls the stored procedure and then calls select *... which necessary here because the query result have to contain the data format expected for the context to build "xdbset" objects.

You can look here for a similar debate.

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