I'm a C++ programmer starting with D and I'm having some trouble understanding the access qualifiers for D classes. Consider the following example:

import std.stdio;

class Foo {

    private void aPrivateMethod()
    {
        writeln("called aPrivateMethod");
    }

    protected void aProtectedMethod()
    {
        writeln("called aProtectedMethod");
    }

    public void aPublicMethod()
    {
        this.aPrivateMethod();
        this.aProtectedMethod();
    }
}

void main(string[] args)
{
    Foo foo = new Foo();

    foo.aPublicMethod();    // OK to call it from anywhere
    foo.aPrivateMethod();   // Must not be allowed to call it outside Foo
    foo.aProtectedMethod(); // Should only be callable from within Foo and derived classes
}

I would expect the previous code to fail compilation, since it is calling private and protected methods of class Foo in an external function. However, this is not the case, since the example above compiles and runs without errors or warnings on DMD v2.063.2. Clearly the keywords have different meaning from those of C++.

My questions are:

1) How to make a method and/or variable private to a class so that only the class in question can access it.

2) How to make a method and/or variable protected, so that only the class in question and its derived classes can access it.

up vote 6 down vote accepted

the access modifiers are module/file level (only exception is protected)

to remove access to a class put it in its own mudule:

foo.d

import std.stdio;
class Foo {

    private void aPrivateMethod()
    {
        writeln("called aPrivateMethod");
    }

    protected void aProtectedMethod()
    {
        writeln("called aProtectedMethod");
    }

    public void aPublicMethod()
    {
        this.aPrivateMethod();
        this.aProtectedMethod();
    }
}

main.d

import foo;

void main(string[] args)
{
    Foo foo = new Foo();

    foo.aPublicMethod();    // OK to call it from anywhere
    foo.aPrivateMethod();   // compile error: Must not be allowed to call it outside foo.d
    foo.aProtectedMethod(); // compile error: Should only be callable from within foo.d, Foo and derived classes
}

D has a slightly different meaning to terms public private and protected than C++

Private means that only members of the enclosing class can access the member, or members and functions in the same module as the enclosing class. Private members cannot be overridden. Private module members are equivalent to static declarations in C programs.

Package extends private so that package members can be accessed from code in other modules that are in the same package. This applies to the innermost package only, if a module is in nested packages.

Protected means that only members of the enclosing class or any classes derived from that class, or members and functions in the same module as the enclosing class, can access the member. If accessing a protected instance member through a derived class member function, that member can only be accessed for the object instance which can be implicitly cast to the same type as ‘this’. Protected module members are illegal.

Public means that any code within the executable can access the member.

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