476

How can I get the nth character of a string? I tried bracket([]) accessor with no luck.

var string = "Hello, world!"

var firstChar = string[0] // Throws error

ERROR: 'subscript' is unavailable: cannot subscript String with an Int, see the documentation comment for discussion

3
  • 1
    The error message “cannot subscript String with an Int, see the documentation comment for discussion” seems to be referring to github.com/apple/swift/blob/master/stdlib/public/core/…
    – andrewdotn
    Aug 6, 2017 at 19:55
  • use var firstChar = string.index(string.startIndex, offsetBy: 0) instead May 22, 2019 at 8:36
  • @SazzadHissainKhan this would result in a string index, not a character. Btw why not simply string.startIndex? For the first character string[string.startIndex] or simply string.first. Note that the first approach you would need to check if the string is empty first the second returns an optional
    – Leo Dabus
    Jul 19, 2019 at 23:20

47 Answers 47

594

Attention: Please see Leo Dabus' answer for a proper implementation for Swift 4 and Swift 5.

Swift 4 or later

The Substring type was introduced in Swift 4 to make substrings faster and more efficient by sharing storage with the original string, so that's what the subscript functions should return.

Try it out here

extension StringProtocol {
    subscript(offset: Int) -> Character { self[index(startIndex, offsetBy: offset)] }
    subscript(range: Range<Int>) -> SubSequence {
        let startIndex = index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: range.lowerBound)
        return self[startIndex..<index(startIndex, offsetBy: range.count)]
    }
    subscript(range: ClosedRange<Int>) -> SubSequence {
        let startIndex = index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: range.lowerBound)
        return self[startIndex..<index(startIndex, offsetBy: range.count)]
    }
    subscript(range: PartialRangeFrom<Int>) -> SubSequence { self[index(startIndex, offsetBy: range.lowerBound)...] }
    subscript(range: PartialRangeThrough<Int>) -> SubSequence { self[...index(startIndex, offsetBy: range.upperBound)] }
    subscript(range: PartialRangeUpTo<Int>) -> SubSequence { self[..<index(startIndex, offsetBy: range.upperBound)] }
}

To convert the Substring into a String, you can simply do String(string[0..2]), but you should only do that if you plan to keep the substring around. Otherwise, it's more efficient to keep it a Substring.

It would be great if someone could figure out a good way to merge these two extensions into one. I tried extending StringProtocol without success, because the index method does not exist there. Note: This answer has been already edited, it is properly implemented and now works for substrings as well. Just make sure to use a valid range to avoid crashing when subscripting your StringProtocol type. For subscripting with a range that won't crash with out of range values you can use this implementation


Why is this not built-in?

The error message says "see the documentation comment for discussion". Apple provides the following explanation in the file UnavailableStringAPIs.swift:

Subscripting strings with integers is not available.

The concept of "the ith character in a string" has different interpretations in different libraries and system components. The correct interpretation should be selected according to the use case and the APIs involved, so String cannot be subscripted with an integer.

Swift provides several different ways to access the character data stored inside strings.

  • String.utf8 is a collection of UTF-8 code units in the string. Use this API when converting the string to UTF-8. Most POSIX APIs process strings in terms of UTF-8 code units.

  • String.utf16 is a collection of UTF-16 code units in string. Most Cocoa and Cocoa touch APIs process strings in terms of UTF-16 code units. For example, instances of NSRange used with NSAttributedString and NSRegularExpression store substring offsets and lengths in terms of UTF-16 code units.

  • String.unicodeScalars is a collection of Unicode scalars. Use this API when you are performing low-level manipulation of character data.

  • String.characters is a collection of extended grapheme clusters, which are an approximation of user-perceived characters.

Note that when processing strings that contain human-readable text, character-by-character processing should be avoided to the largest extent possible. Use high-level locale-sensitive Unicode algorithms instead, for example, String.localizedStandardCompare(), String.localizedLowercaseString, String.localizedStandardRangeOfString() etc.

23
  • 4
    Cannot find an overload for 'advance' that accepts an argument list of type '(String.Index, T)' ... String.Index and Int aren't compatible.
    – user246672
    Jun 19, 2015 at 2:33
  • 7
    If you see Cannot subscript a value of type 'String'... check this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/31265316/649379 Jul 7, 2015 at 9:57
  • 24
    When I try to use this, I get Ambiguous use of 'subscript'.
    – jowie
    Mar 2, 2016 at 16:55
  • 23
    WARNING! The extension below is horribly inefficient. Every time a string is accessed with an integer, an O(n) function to advance its starting index is run. Running a linear loop inside another linear loop means this for loop is accidentally O(n2) — as the length of the string increases, the time this loop takes increases quadratically. Instead of doing that you could use the characters's string collection. Jun 18, 2016 at 17:21
  • 2
    fatal error: Can't form a Character from an empty String Jun 22, 2016 at 21:29
408

Swift 5.2

let str = "abcdef"
str[1 ..< 3] // returns "bc"
str[5] // returns "f"
str[80] // returns ""
str.substring(fromIndex: 3) // returns "def"
str.substring(toIndex: str.length - 2) // returns "abcd"

You will need to add this String extension to your project (it's fully tested):

extension String {

    var length: Int {
        return count
    }

    subscript (i: Int) -> String {
        return self[i ..< i + 1]
    }

    func substring(fromIndex: Int) -> String {
        return self[min(fromIndex, length) ..< length]
    }

    func substring(toIndex: Int) -> String {
        return self[0 ..< max(0, toIndex)]
    }

    subscript (r: Range<Int>) -> String {
        let range = Range(uncheckedBounds: (lower: max(0, min(length, r.lowerBound)),
                                            upper: min(length, max(0, r.upperBound))))
        let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: range.lowerBound)
        let end = index(start, offsetBy: range.upperBound - range.lowerBound)
        return String(self[start ..< end])
    }
}

Even though Swift always had out of the box solution to this problem (without String extension, which I provided below), I still would strongly recommend using the extension. Why? Because it saved me tens of hours of painful migration from early versions of Swift, where String's syntax was changing almost every release, but all I needed to do was to update the extension's implementation as opposed to refactoring the entire project. Make your choice.

let str = "Hello, world!"
let index = str.index(str.startIndex, offsetBy: 4)
str[index] // returns Character 'o'

let endIndex = str.index(str.endIndex, offsetBy:-2)
str[index ..< endIndex] // returns String "o, worl"

String(str.suffix(from: index)) // returns String "o, world!"
String(str.prefix(upTo: index)) // returns String "Hell"
8
  • change range.upperBound - range.lowerBound to range.count
    – Leo Dabus
    Oct 25, 2017 at 23:32
  • It's not part of the original question, but... it would be nice if this supported assignment too. E.g., s[i] = "a" :). Nov 6, 2017 at 23:57
  • 3
    I believe with Swift 4.2 subscripts are not available again. I get an error saying: 'subscript' is unavailable: cannot subscript String with an Int, see the documentation comment for discussion
    – C0D3
    Oct 14, 2018 at 15:14
  • 2
    @ChrisPrince extension StringProtocol where Self: RangeReplaceableCollection { subscript(offset: Int) -> Element { get { return self[index(startIndex, offsetBy: offset)] } set { let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: offset) replaceSubrange(start..<index(after: start), with: [newValue]) } } }
    – Leo Dabus
    Dec 11, 2018 at 3:08
  • This should be built-in functions Jan 29, 2020 at 7:31
175

I just came up with this neat workaround

var firstChar = Array(string)[0]
11
  • 2
    This is a good quick work-around for the (common) case where you know you have UTF8 or ASCII encoded strings. Just be sure that the strings will never be in an encoding that uses more than one byte.
    – Jeff Hay
    Aug 19, 2014 at 15:04
  • 56
    That seems extremely inefficient as you are copying the entire string just to get the first character. Use string[string. startIndex] instead of 0 as Sulthan pointed out.
    – Bjorn
    Jan 12, 2015 at 3:25
  • 7
    Unwrap string: var firstChar = Array(string!)[0] Otherwise it will say add arrayLiteral Apr 9, 2015 at 13:58
  • 2
    I don't believe this is clean, as a matter of fact it's a round about. I'm not quite sure which initializer in Array is used first causing this to happen (and I'm assuming it's the SequenceType initializer causing it to gather the characters of the string as individual components for the Array). This isn't explicit at all and may be corrected in the future without type casting. This also doesn't work if you use shorthand for the array via [string].first. @Sulthan's solution works best to use the baked in index values. It's far more clear on what is happening here. May 25, 2015 at 18:22
  • 2
    Wow, compiler segment fault!
    – Frank
    Sep 26, 2016 at 3:43
154

Xcode 11 • Swift 5.1

You can extend StringProtocol to make the subscript available also to the substrings:

extension StringProtocol {
    subscript(_ offset: Int)                     -> Element     { self[index(startIndex, offsetBy: offset)] }
    subscript(_ range: Range<Int>)               -> SubSequence { prefix(range.lowerBound+range.count).suffix(range.count) }
    subscript(_ range: ClosedRange<Int>)         -> SubSequence { prefix(range.lowerBound+range.count).suffix(range.count) }
    subscript(_ range: PartialRangeThrough<Int>) -> SubSequence { prefix(range.upperBound.advanced(by: 1)) }
    subscript(_ range: PartialRangeUpTo<Int>)    -> SubSequence { prefix(range.upperBound) }
    subscript(_ range: PartialRangeFrom<Int>)    -> SubSequence { suffix(Swift.max(0, count-range.lowerBound)) }
}

extension LosslessStringConvertible {
    var string: String { .init(self) }
}

extension BidirectionalCollection {
    subscript(safe offset: Int) -> Element? {
        guard !isEmpty, let i = index(startIndex, offsetBy: offset, limitedBy: index(before: endIndex)) else { return nil }
        return self[i]
    }
}

Testing

let test = "Hello USA 🇺🇸!!! Hello Brazil 🇧🇷!!!"
test[safe: 10]   // "🇺🇸"
test[11]   // "!"
test[10...]   // "🇺🇸!!! Hello Brazil 🇧🇷!!!"
test[10..<12]   // "🇺🇸!"
test[10...12]   // "🇺🇸!!"
test[...10]   // "Hello USA 🇺🇸"
test[..<10]   // "Hello USA "
test.first   // "H"
test.last    // "!"

// Subscripting the Substring
 test[...][...3]  // "Hell"

// Note that they all return a Substring of the original String.
// To create a new String from a substring
test[10...].string  // "🇺🇸!!! Hello Brazil 🇧🇷!!!"
8
  • May I ask what is "self[index(startIndex, offsetBy: i)]"? And how does "self[i]" work?
    – allenlinli
    Sep 22, 2016 at 13:12
  • 1
    Hi Leo, thank you for the solution! I just (today) switched to from Swift 2.3 to 3 and your solution subscript(range: Range<Int>) gives the error "Extra argument 'limitedBy' in call". What do you think can be wrong? Oct 3, 2016 at 14:56
  • @AhmetAkkök are you sure you didn't change the code?
    – Leo Dabus
    Oct 3, 2016 at 15:26
  • 1
    @Leo it turned out I did not convert the whole project but on the app not the extension, I'have repeated the process for both app and the extension and it works OK now. Your help is very much appreciated! Oct 3, 2016 at 15:57
  • this is very complicated code. What's the advantage over doing return String(Array(characters)[range]) in Swift 3? Nov 7, 2016 at 16:25
128

No indexing using integers, only using String.Index. Mostly with linear complexity. You can also create ranges from String.Index and get substrings using them.

Swift 3.0

let firstChar = someString[someString.startIndex]
let lastChar = someString[someString.index(before: someString.endIndex)]
let charAtIndex = someString[someString.index(someString.startIndex, offsetBy: 10)]

let range = someString.startIndex..<someString.index(someString.startIndex, offsetBy: 10)
let substring = someString[range]

Swift 2.x

let firstChar = someString[someString.startIndex]
let lastChar = someString[someString.endIndex.predecessor()]
let charAtIndex = someString[someString.startIndex.advanceBy(10)]

let range = someString.startIndex..<someString.startIndex.advanceBy(10)
let subtring = someString[range]

Note that you can't ever use an index (or range) created from one string to another string

let index10 = someString.startIndex.advanceBy(10)

//will compile
//sometimes it will work but sometimes it will crash or result in undefined behaviour
let charFromAnotherString = anotherString[index10]
6
  • 8
    String indexs are unique to a string. This is because different strings may have different multi-unit UTF-16 Characters and/or at different positions so the UTF-16 unit indexs will not match, may fall beyond the end or point inside a multi-unit UTF-16 Character.
    – zaph
    Aug 19, 2014 at 15:34
  • @Zaph That's obvious.
    – Sulthan
    Aug 19, 2014 at 15:58
  • 3
    Explaning why you say: "sometimes it will crash or result in undefined behaviour". Perhaps better to say just don't do it because ...
    – zaph
    Aug 19, 2014 at 17:17
  • 1
    @Sulthan .. is now ..< (in your assignment to range) Oct 25, 2014 at 4:41
  • 3
    @CajunLuke I know it's been a while since you posted this comment, but take a look at this answer. You can use var lastChar = string[string.endIndex.predecessor()]
    – David L
    Dec 14, 2014 at 7:11
80

Swift 4

let str = "My String"

String at index

let index = str.index(str.startIndex, offsetBy: 3)
String(str[index])    // "S"

Substring

let startIndex = str.index(str.startIndex, offsetBy: 3)
let endIndex = str.index(str.startIndex, offsetBy: 7)
String(str[startIndex...endIndex])     // "Strin"

First n chars

let startIndex = str.index(str.startIndex, offsetBy: 3)
String(str[..<startIndex])    // "My "

Last n chars

let startIndex = str.index(str.startIndex, offsetBy: 3)
String(str[startIndex...])    // "String"

Swift 2 and 3

str = "My String"

**String At Index **

Swift 2

let charAtIndex = String(str[str.startIndex.advancedBy(3)])  // charAtIndex = "S"

Swift 3

str[str.index(str.startIndex, offsetBy: 3)]

SubString fromIndex toIndex

Swift 2

let subStr = str[str.startIndex.advancedBy(3)...str.startIndex.advancedBy(7)] // subStr = "Strin"

Swift 3

str[str.index(str.startIndex, offsetBy: 3)...str.index(str.startIndex, offsetBy: 7)]

First n chars

let first2Chars = String(str.characters.prefix(2)) // first2Chars = "My"

Last n chars

let last3Chars = String(str.characters.suffix(3)) // last3Chars = "ing"
26

Swift 5.3

I think this is very elegant. Kudos at Paul Hudson of "Hacking with Swift" for this solution:

@available (macOS 10.15, * )
extension String {
    subscript(idx: Int) -> String {
        String(self[index(startIndex, offsetBy: idx)])
    }
}

Then to get one character out of the String you simply do:

var string = "Hello, world!"

var firstChar = string[0] // No error, returns "H" as a String

NB: I just wanted to add, this will return a String as pointed out in the comments. I think it might be unexpected for Swift users, but often I need a String to use in my code straight away and not a Character type, so it does simplify my code a little bit avoiding a conversion from Character to String later.

3
  • what will be the time complexity of doing this ? Feb 26, 2021 at 5:38
  • 2
    The time complexity is the same as doing it in code with let firstChar = string[string.index(string.startIndex, offsetBy: 0)]
    – multitudes
    Feb 26, 2021 at 12:13
  • This is exactly what is being done at the accepted answer. The only difference is that you are extending String instead of the StringProtocol (which supports substrings as well) and returning a string instead of a character which is totally unexpected considering that it should return the collection element which in this case is a character
    – Leo Dabus
    Jun 25, 2021 at 2:36
24

Swift 2.0 as of Xcode 7 GM Seed

var text = "Hello, world!"

let firstChar = text[text.startIndex.advancedBy(0)] // "H"

For the nth character, replace 0 with n-1.

Edit: Swift 3.0

text[text.index(text.startIndex, offsetBy: 0)]


n.b. there are simpler ways of grabbing certain characters in the string

e.g. let firstChar = text.characters.first

0
24

If you see Cannot subscript a value of type 'String'... use this extension:

Swift 3

extension String {
    subscript (i: Int) -> Character {
        return self[self.characters.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: i)]
    }

    subscript (i: Int) -> String {
        return String(self[i] as Character)
    }

    subscript (r: Range<Int>) -> String {
        let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: r.lowerBound)
        let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: r.upperBound)
        return self[start..<end]
    }

    subscript (r: ClosedRange<Int>) -> String {
        let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: r.lowerBound)
        let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: r.upperBound)
        return self[start...end]
    }
}

Swift 2.3

extension String {
    subscript(integerIndex: Int) -> Character {
        let index = advance(startIndex, integerIndex)
        return self[index]
    }

    subscript(integerRange: Range<Int>) -> String {
        let start = advance(startIndex, integerRange.startIndex)
        let end = advance(startIndex, integerRange.endIndex)
        let range = start..<end
        return self[range]
    }
}

Source: http://oleb.net/blog/2014/07/swift-strings/

0
19

Swift 2.2 Solution:

The following extension works in Xcode 7, this is a combination of this solution and Swift 2.0 syntax conversion.

extension String {
    subscript(integerIndex: Int) -> Character {
        let index = startIndex.advancedBy(integerIndex)
        return self[index]
    }

    subscript(integerRange: Range<Int>) -> String {
        let start = startIndex.advancedBy(integerRange.startIndex)
        let end = startIndex.advancedBy(integerRange.endIndex)
        let range = start..<end
        return self[range]
    }
}
16

The swift string class does not provide the ability to get a character at a specific index because of its native support for UTF characters. The variable length of a UTF character in memory makes jumping directly to a character impossible. That means you have to manually loop over the string each time.

You can extend String to provide a method that will loop through the characters until your desired index

extension String {
    func characterAtIndex(index: Int) -> Character? {
        var cur = 0
        for char in self {
            if cur == index {
                return char
            }
            cur++
        }
        return nil
    }
}

myString.characterAtIndex(0)!
9
  • 4
    You can already loop through strings: for letter in "foo" { println(letter) }
    – Doobeh
    Jun 7, 2014 at 1:56
  • @Doobeh I meant loop through and return the actual character like in my edit above
    – drewag
    Jun 7, 2014 at 2:01
  • nice! It's funny how you can iterate through it, but not via an index. Swift's feeling pythonic but with harder edges.
    – Doobeh
    Jun 7, 2014 at 2:10
  • I found using the myString.bridgeToObjectiveC().characterAtIndex(0) or (string as NSString ).characterAtIndex(0) returns an Int value of the character
    – markhunte
    Jun 7, 2014 at 9:24
  • 4
    Don't use NSString methods for accessing individual characters from a Swift-native String - the two use different counting mechanisms, so you'll get unpredictable results with higher Unicode characters. The first method should be safe (once Swift's Unicode bugs are handled).
    – Nate Cook
    Jun 9, 2014 at 16:01
11

As an aside note, there are a few functions applyable directly to the Character-chain representation of a String, like this:

var string = "Hello, playground"
let firstCharacter = string.characters.first // returns "H"
let lastCharacter = string.characters.last // returns "d"

The result is of type Character, but you can cast it to a String.

Or this:

let reversedString = String(string.characters.reverse())
// returns "dnuorgyalp ,olleH" 

:-)

11

Swift 4

String(Array(stringToIndex)[index]) 

This is probably the best way of solving this problem one-time. You probably want to cast the String as an array first, and then cast the result as a String again. Otherwise, a Character will be returned instead of a String.

Example String(Array("HelloThere")[1]) will return "e" as a String.

(Array("HelloThere")[1] will return "e" as a Character.

Swift does not allow Strings to be indexed like arrays, but this gets the job done, brute-force style.

1
  • 1
    Duplicating the whole string contents to another memory location is counter-performant, especially for large strings. We should not need extra memory allocations for simple tasks like direct memory access.
    – Cristik
    Dec 28, 2019 at 19:47
11

You can do it by convert String into Array and get it by specific index using subscript as below

var str = "Hello"
let s = Array(str)[2]
print(s)
1
  • 2
    Note that this solution will result in contents duplication, making it less performant memory wise and CPU-wise.
    – Cristik
    Dec 28, 2019 at 19:42
7

I just had the same issue. Simply do this:

var aString: String = "test"
var aChar:unichar = (aString as NSString).characterAtIndex(0)
1
  • This fails for many Emoji and other characters that actually take up more than once "character" in an NSString.
    – rmaddy
    May 25, 2017 at 2:37
7

My very simple solution:

Swift 4.1:

let myString = "Test string"
let index = 0
let firstCharacter = myString[String.Index(encodedOffset: index)]

Swift 5.1:

let firstCharacter = myString[String.Index.init(utf16Offset: index, in: myString)]
6
  • Works in Swift 4.1
    – leanne
    Aug 25, 2018 at 18:09
  • Simplest solution and now with Swift 5 example :)
    – OhadM
    Sep 21, 2019 at 12:19
  • @Linh Dao Don't use encodedOffset. encodedOffset is deprecated: encodedOffset has been deprecated as most common usage is incorrect.
    – Leo Dabus
    Feb 22, 2020 at 18:36
  • @OhadM simplest doesn't mean it is correct or at least it won't work as you expect Try let flags = "🇺🇸🇧🇷" flags[String.Index(utf16Offset: 4, in: flags)] // "🇧🇷"
    – Leo Dabus
    Feb 22, 2020 at 18:38
  • 1
    @OhadM My comment was just a warning. Fell free to use it if you think that it behaves how you expect.
    – Leo Dabus
    Feb 23, 2020 at 7:58
5

Swift3

You can use subscript syntax to access the Character at a particular String index.

let greeting = "Guten Tag!"
let index = greeting.index(greeting.startIndex, offsetBy: 7)
greeting[index] // a

Visit https://developer.apple.com/library/content/documentation/Swift/Conceptual/Swift_Programming_Language/StringsAndCharacters.html

or we can do a String Extension in Swift 4

extension String {
    func getCharAtIndex(_ index: Int) -> Character {
        return self[self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: index)]
    }
}

USAGE:

let foo = "ABC123"
foo.getCharAtIndex(2) //C
4

By now, subscript(_:) is unavailable. As well as we can't do this

str[0] 

with string.We have to provide "String.Index" But, how can we give our own index number in this way, instead we can use,

string[str.index(str.startIndex, offsetBy: 0)]
2
  • Please edit your answer and add some context by explaining how your answer solves the problem, instead of posting code-only answer. From Review
    – Pedram
    Dec 28, 2019 at 19:03
  • Why doing the unnecessary offset-ing? Why not simply string[string.startIndex]? BTW, the code would not correctly behave/compile, as you used two different variable names.
    – Cristik
    Dec 28, 2019 at 19:40
4

In Swift 5 without extension to the String :

var str = "ABCDEFGH"
for char in str {
if(char == "C") { }
}

Above Swift code as same as that Java code :

int n = 8;
var str = "ABCDEFGH"
for (int i=0; i<n; i++) {
if (str.charAt(i) == 'C') { }
}
4

Swift 5.1.3:

Add a String extension:

extension String {

 func stringAt(_ i: Int) -> String { 
   return String(Array(self)[i]) 
 } 

 func charAt(_ i: Int) -> Character { 
  return Array(self)[i] 
 } 
}

let str = "Teja Kumar"
let str1: String = str.stringAt(2)  //"j"
let str2: Character = str.charAt(5)  //"k"
1
  • 8
    This will convert the whole string into an array of characters every time you call this property to extract a single character from it.
    – Leo Dabus
    Feb 22, 2020 at 18:19
3

My solution is in one line, supposing cadena is the string and 4 is the nth position that you want:

let character = cadena[advance(cadena.startIndex, 4)]

Simple... I suppose Swift will include more things about substrings in future versions.

2
  • 2
    Isn't that the same as var charAtIndex = string[advance(string.startIndex, 10)] in Sulthan's answer?
    – Martin R
    Aug 19, 2014 at 14:54
  • Yes, it's the same solution with another example like Sulthan's said. Sorry for the duplicate. :) It's easy two people found the same way. Aug 19, 2014 at 18:45
3

Swift 3: another solution (tested in playground)

extension String {
    func substr(_ start:Int, length:Int=0) -> String? {
        guard start > -1 else {
            return nil
        }

        let count = self.characters.count - 1

        guard start <= count else {
            return nil
        }

        let startOffset = max(0, start)
        let endOffset = length > 0 ? min(count, startOffset + length - 1) : count

        return self[self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: startOffset)...self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: endOffset)]
    }
}

Usage:

let txt = "12345"

txt.substr(-1) //nil
txt.substr(0) //"12345"
txt.substr(0, length: 0) //"12345"
txt.substr(1) //"2345"
txt.substr(2) //"345"
txt.substr(3) //"45"
txt.substr(4) //"5"
txt.substr(6) //nil
txt.substr(0, length: 1) //"1"
txt.substr(1, length: 1) //"2"
txt.substr(2, length: 1) //"3"
txt.substr(3, length: 1) //"4"
txt.substr(3, length: 2) //"45"
txt.substr(3, length: 3) //"45"
txt.substr(4, length: 1) //"5"
txt.substr(4, length: 2) //"5"
txt.substr(5, length: 1) //nil
txt.substr(5, length: -1) //nil
txt.substr(-1, length: -1) //nil
3

Swift 4.2 or later

Range and partial range subscripting using String's indices property

As variation of @LeoDabus nice answer, we may add an additional extension to DefaultIndices with the purpose of allowing us to fall back on the indices property of String when implementing the custom subscripts (by Int specialized ranges and partial ranges) for the latter.

extension DefaultIndices {
    subscript(at: Int) -> Elements.Index { index(startIndex, offsetBy: at) }
}

// Moving the index(_:offsetBy:) to an extension yields slightly
// briefer implementations for these String extensions.
extension String {
    subscript(range: Range<Int>) -> SubSequence {
        let start = indices[range.lowerBound]
        return self[start..<indices[start...][range.count]]
    }
    subscript(range: ClosedRange<Int>) -> SubSequence {
        let start = indices[range.lowerBound]
        return self[start...indices[start...][range.count]]
    }
    subscript(range: PartialRangeFrom<Int>) -> SubSequence {
        self[indices[range.lowerBound]...]
    }
    subscript(range: PartialRangeThrough<Int>) -> SubSequence {
        self[...indices[range.upperBound]]
    }
    subscript(range: PartialRangeUpTo<Int>) -> SubSequence {
        self[..<indices[range.upperBound]]
    }
}

let str = "foo bar baz bax"
print(str[4..<6]) // "ba"
print(str[4...6]) // "bar"
print(str[4...])  // "bar baz bax"
print(str[...6])  // "foo bar"
print(str[..<6])  // "foo ba"

Thanks @LeoDabus for the pointing me in the direction of using the indices property as an(other) alternative to String subscripting!

8
  • 1
    the only disadvantage is CountableClosedRange will offset both indexes from the startIndex
    – Leo Dabus
    Oct 25, 2017 at 20:51
  • stackoverflow.com/a/38215613/4573247 now extends StringProtocol to support Substrings as well
    – Leo Dabus
    Mar 26, 2018 at 23:38
  • 1
    @LeoDabus I see. Yes mostly linux but not much Swift these days :/ I use swiftenv when I do, though, I guess it will be updated with 4.2 also somewhat soon then.
    – dfrib
    Aug 31, 2018 at 19:29
  • 1
    @LeoDabus thanks for updating this answer to modern Swift!
    – dfrib
    Jan 27, 2020 at 8:06
  • 1
    @LeoDabus nice work! Will have to look into the details at a later time, but I do recall that I never liked that we had to fall back on Foundation some of the ordered/countable set types.
    – dfrib
    Jan 27, 2020 at 10:02
3

Best way which worked for me is:

var firstName = "Olivia"
var lastName = "Pope"

var nameInitials.text = "\(firstName.prefix(1))" + "\    (lastName.prefix(1))"

Output:"OP"

2

Update for swift 2.0 subString

public extension String {
    public subscript (i: Int) -> String {
        return self.substringWithRange(self.startIndex..<self.startIndex.advancedBy(i + 1))
    }

    public subscript (r: Range<Int>) -> String {
        get {
            return self.substringWithRange(self.startIndex.advancedBy(r.startIndex)..<self.startIndex.advancedBy(r.endIndex))
        }
    }

}
0
2

I think that a fast answer for get the first character could be:

let firstCharacter = aString[aString.startIndex]

It's so much elegant and performance than:

let firstCharacter = Array(aString.characters).first

But.. if you want manipulate and do more operations with strings you could think create an extension..here is one extension with this approach, it's quite similar to that already posted here:

extension String {
var length : Int {
    return self.characters.count
}

subscript(integerIndex: Int) -> Character {
    let index = startIndex.advancedBy(integerIndex)
    return self[index]
}

subscript(integerRange: Range<Int>) -> String {
    let start = startIndex.advancedBy(integerRange.startIndex)
    let end = startIndex.advancedBy(integerRange.endIndex)
    let range = start..<end
    return self[range]
}

}

BUT IT'S A TERRIBLE IDEA!!

The extension below is horribly inefficient. Every time a string is accessed with an integer, an O(n) function to advance its starting index is run. Running a linear loop inside another linear loop means this for loop is accidentally O(n2) — as the length of the string increases, the time this loop takes increases quadratically.

Instead of doing that you could use the characters's string collection.

2

Swift 3

extension String {

    public func charAt(_ i: Int) -> Character {
        return self[self.characters.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: i)]
    }

    public subscript (i: Int) -> String {
        return String(self.charAt(i) as Character)
    }

    public subscript (r: Range<Int>) -> String {
        return substring(with: self.characters.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: r.lowerBound)..<self.characters.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: r.upperBound))
    }

    public subscript (r: CountableClosedRange<Int>) -> String {
        return substring(with: self.characters.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: r.lowerBound)..<self.characters.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: r.upperBound))
    }

}

Usage

let str = "Hello World"
let sub = str[0...4]

Helpful Programming Tips and Tricks (written by me)

2

Here's an extension you can use, working with Swift 3.1. A single index will return a Character, which seems intuitive when indexing a String, and a Range will return a String.

extension String {
    subscript (i: Int) -> Character {
        return Array(self.characters)[i]
    }
    
    subscript (r: CountableClosedRange<Int>) -> String {
        return String(Array(self.characters)[r])
    }
    
    subscript (r: CountableRange<Int>) -> String {
        return self[r.lowerBound...r.upperBound-1]
    }
}

Some examples of the extension in action:

let string = "Hello"

let c1 = string[1]  // Character "e"
let c2 = string[-1] // fatal error: Index out of range

let r1 = string[1..<4] // String "ell"
let r2 = string[1...4] // String "ello"
let r3 = string[1...5] // fatal error: Array index is out of range


n.b. You could add an additional method to the above extension to return a String with a single character if wanted:

subscript (i: Int) -> String {
    return String(self[i])
}

Note that then you would have to explicitly specify the type you wanted when indexing the string:

let c: Character = string[3] // Character "l"
let s: String = string[0]    // String "H"
1
  • Creating an Array just to access an element seems like over-engineering, and also has performance costs as the string contents will have to be duplicated in memory.
    – Cristik
    Dec 28, 2019 at 19:50
2

Get & Set Subscript (String & Substring) - Swift 4.2

Swift 4.2, Xcode 10

I based my answer off of @alecarlson's answer. The only big difference is you can get a Substring or a String returned (and in some cases, a single Character). You can also get and set the subscript. Lastly, mine is a bit more cumbersome and longer than @alecarlson's answer and as such, I suggest you put it in a source file.


Extension:

public extension String {
    public subscript (i: Int) -> Character {
        get {
            return self[index(startIndex, offsetBy: i)]
        }
        set (c) {
            let n = index(startIndex, offsetBy: i)
            replaceSubrange(n...n, with: "\(c)")
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: CountableRange<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return self[start ..< end]
        }
        set (s) {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(start ..< end, with: s)
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: CountableClosedRange<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return self[start ... end]
        }
        set (s) {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(start ... end, with: s)
        }
        
    }
    public subscript (bounds: CountablePartialRangeFrom<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(endIndex, offsetBy: -1)
            return self[start ... end]
        }
        set (s) {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(endIndex, offsetBy: -1)
            replaceSubrange(start ... end, with: s)
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: PartialRangeThrough<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return self[startIndex ... end]
        }
        set (s) {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(startIndex ... end, with: s)
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: PartialRangeUpTo<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return self[startIndex ..< end]
        }
        set (s) {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(startIndex ..< end, with: s)
        }
    }
    
    public subscript (i: Int) -> String {
        get {
            return "\(self[index(startIndex, offsetBy: i)])"
        }
        set (c) {
            let n = index(startIndex, offsetBy: i)
            self.replaceSubrange(n...n, with: "\(c)")
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: CountableRange<Int>) -> String {
        get {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return "\(self[start ..< end])"
        }
        set (s) {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(start ..< end, with: s)
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: CountableClosedRange<Int>) -> String {
        get {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return "\(self[start ... end])"
        }
        set (s) {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(start ... end, with: s)
        }
        
    }
    public subscript (bounds: CountablePartialRangeFrom<Int>) -> String {
        get {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(endIndex, offsetBy: -1)
            return "\(self[start ... end])"
        }
        set (s) {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(endIndex, offsetBy: -1)
            replaceSubrange(start ... end, with: s)
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: PartialRangeThrough<Int>) -> String {
        get {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return "\(self[startIndex ... end])"
        }
        set (s) {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(startIndex ... end, with: s)
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: PartialRangeUpTo<Int>) -> String {
        get {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return "\(self[startIndex ..< end])"
        }
        set (s) {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(startIndex ..< end, with: s)
        }
    }
    
    public subscript (i: Int) -> Substring {
        get {
            return Substring("\(self[index(startIndex, offsetBy: i)])")
        }
        set (c) {
            let n = index(startIndex, offsetBy: i)
            replaceSubrange(n...n, with: "\(c)")
        }
    }
}
public extension Substring {
    public subscript (i: Int) -> Character {
        get {
            return self[index(startIndex, offsetBy: i)]
        }
        set (c) {
            let n = index(startIndex, offsetBy: i)
            replaceSubrange(n...n, with: "\(c)")
        }
        
    }
    public subscript (bounds: CountableRange<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return self[start ..< end]
        }
        set (s) {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(start ..< end, with: s)
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: CountableClosedRange<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return self[start ... end]
        }
        set (s) {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(start ... end, with: s)
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: CountablePartialRangeFrom<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(endIndex, offsetBy: -1)
            return self[start ... end]
        }
        set (s) {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(endIndex, offsetBy: -1)
            replaceSubrange(start ... end, with: s)
        }
        
    }
    public subscript (bounds: PartialRangeThrough<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return self[startIndex ... end]
        }
        set (s) {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(startIndex ..< end, with: s)
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: PartialRangeUpTo<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return self[startIndex ..< end]
        }
        set (s) {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(startIndex ..< end, with: s)
        }
    }
    public subscript (i: Int) -> String {
        get {
            return "\(self[index(startIndex, offsetBy: i)])"
        }
        set (c) {
            let n = index(startIndex, offsetBy: i)
            replaceSubrange(n...n, with: "\(c)")
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: CountableRange<Int>) -> String {
        get {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return "\(self[start ..< end])"
        }
        set (s) {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(start ..< end, with: s)
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: CountableClosedRange<Int>) -> String {
        get {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return "\(self[start ... end])"
        }
        set (s) {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(start ... end, with: s)
        }
        
    }
    public subscript (bounds: CountablePartialRangeFrom<Int>) -> String {
        get {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(endIndex, offsetBy: -1)
            return "\(self[start ... end])"
        }
        set (s) {
            let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
            let end = index(endIndex, offsetBy: -1)
            replaceSubrange(start ... end, with: s)
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: PartialRangeThrough<Int>) -> String {
        get {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return "\(self[startIndex ... end])"
        }
        set (s) {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(startIndex ... end, with: s)
        }
    }
    public subscript (bounds: PartialRangeUpTo<Int>) -> String {
        get {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            return "\(self[startIndex ..< end])"
        }
        set (s) {
            let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
            replaceSubrange(startIndex ..< end, with: s)
        }
    }
    
    public subscript (i: Int) -> Substring {
        get {
            return Substring("\(self[index(startIndex, offsetBy: i)])")
        }
        set (c) {
            let n = index(startIndex, offsetBy: i)
            replaceSubrange(n...n, with: "\(c)")
        }
    }
}
1
  • This is unnecessarily offsets both indexes (start and end) from the startIndex. You could simply offset the end index using the range.count and offset the start index
    – Leo Dabus
    Feb 22, 2020 at 18:42
2

Swift 4.2

This answer is ideal because it extends String and all of its Subsequences (Substring) in one extension

public extension StringProtocol {
    
    public subscript (i: Int) -> Element {
        return self[index(startIndex, offsetBy: i)]
    }

    public subscript (bounds: CountableClosedRange<Int>) -> SubSequence {
        let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
        let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
        return self[start...end]
    }
    
    public subscript (bounds: CountableRange<Int>) -> SubSequence {
        let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
        let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
        return self[start..<end]
    }
    
    public subscript (bounds: PartialRangeUpTo<Int>) -> SubSequence {
        let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
        return self[startIndex..<end]
    }
    
    public subscript (bounds: PartialRangeThrough<Int>) -> SubSequence {
        let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
        return self[startIndex...end]
    }
    
    public subscript (bounds: CountablePartialRangeFrom<Int>) -> SubSequence {
        let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
        return self[start..<endIndex]
    }
}

Usage

var str = "Hello, playground"

print(str[5...][...5][0])
// Prints ","
1
  • This is unnecessarily offsets both indexes (start and end) from the startIndex. You could simply offset the end index using the range.count and offset the start index
    – Leo Dabus
    Dec 19, 2018 at 0:24

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