371

How can I get the nth character of a string? I tried bracket([]) accessor with no luck.

var string = "Hello, world!"

var firstChar = string[0] // Throws error

ERROR: 'subscript' is unavailable: cannot subscript String with an Int, see the documentation comment for discussion

39 Answers 39

1

There's an alternative, explained in String manifesto

extension String : BidirectionalCollection {
    subscript(i: Index) -> Character { return characters[i] }
}
1

Get the first letter:

first(str) // retrieve first letter

More here: http://sketchytech.blogspot.com/2014/08/swift-pure-swift-method-for-returning.html

0

You could use SwiftString (https://github.com/amayne/SwiftString) to do this.

"Hello, world!"[0] // H
"Hello, world!"[0...4] // Hello

DISCLAIMER: I wrote this extension

0

I wanted to point out that if you have a large string and need to randomly access many characters from it, you may want to pay the extra memory cost and convert the string to an array for better performance:

// Pay up front for O(N) memory
let chars = Array(veryLargeString.characters)

for i in 0...veryLargeNumber {
    // Benefit from O(1) access
    print(chars[i])
}
0

Allows Negative Indices

Its always useful not always having to write string[string.length - 1] to get the last character when using a subscript extension. This (Swift 3) extension allows for negative indices, Range and CountableClosedRange.

extension String {
    var count: Int { return self.characters.count }

    subscript (i: Int) -> Character {
        // wraps out of bounds indices
        let j = i % self.count
        // wraps negative indices
        let x = j < 0 ? j + self.count : j

        // quick exit for first
        guard x != 0 else {
            return self.characters.first!
        }

        // quick exit for last
        guard x != count - 1 else {
            return self.characters.last!
        }

        return self[self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: x)]
    }

    subscript (r: Range<Int>) -> String {
        let lb = r.lowerBound
        let ub = r.upperBound

        // quick exit for one character
        guard lb != ub else { return String(self[lb]) }

        return self[self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: lb)..<self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: ub)]
    }

    subscript (r: CountableClosedRange<Int>) -> String {
        return self[r.lowerBound..<r.upperBound + 1]
    }
}

How you can use it:

var text = "Hello World"

text[-1]    // d
text[2]     // l
text[12]    // e
text[0...4] // Hello
text[0..<4] // Hell

For the more thorough Programmer: Include a guard against empty Strings in this extension

subscript (i: Int) -> Character {
    guard self.count != 0 else { return '' }
    ...
}

subscript (r: Range<Int>) -> String {
    guard self.count != 0 else { return "" }
    ...
}
0

Swift 3:

extension String {
    func substring(fromPosition: UInt, toPosition: UInt) -> String? {
        guard fromPosition <= toPosition else {
            return nil
        }

        guard toPosition < UInt(characters.count) else {
            return nil
        }

        let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: String.IndexDistance(fromPosition))
        let end   = index(startIndex, offsetBy: String.IndexDistance(toPosition) + 1)
        let range = start..<end

        return substring(with: range)
    }
}

"ffaabbcc".substring(fromPosition: 2, toPosition: 5) // return "aabb"
0

Include this extension in your project

  extension String{
func trim() -> String
{
    return self.trimmingCharacters(in: NSCharacterSet.whitespaces)
}

var length: Int {
    return self.count
}

subscript (i: Int) -> String {
    return self[i ..< i + 1]
}

func substring(fromIndex: Int) -> String {
    return self[min(fromIndex, length) ..< length]
}

func substring(toIndex: Int) -> String {
    return self[0 ..< max(0, toIndex)]
}

subscript (r: Range<Int>) -> String {
    let range = Range(uncheckedBounds: (lower: max(0, min(length, r.lowerBound)),
                                        upper: min(length, max(0, r.upperBound))))
    let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: range.lowerBound)
    let end = index(start, offsetBy: range.upperBound - range.lowerBound)
    return String(self[start ..< end])
}

func substring(fromIndex: Int, toIndex:Int)->String{
    let startIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: fromIndex)
    let endIndex = self.index(startIndex, offsetBy: toIndex-fromIndex)

    return String(self[startIndex...endIndex])
}

An then use the function like this

let str = "Sample-String"

let substring = str.substring(fromIndex: 0, toIndex: 0) //returns S
let sampleSubstr = str.substring(fromIndex: 0, toIndex: 5) //returns Sample
0

Check this is Swift 4

let myString = "LOVE"

self.textField1.text = String(Array(myString)[0])
self.textField2.text = String(Array(myString)[1])
self.textField3.text = String(Array(myString)[2])
self.textField4.text = String(Array(myString)[3])
-2

prob one of the best and simpliest way

        let yourString = "thisString"
        print(Array(yourString)[8])

puts each letters of your string into arrrays and then you sellect the 9th one

  • Same solution already given by Sreekanth G, Matt Le Fleur and others. And your version is worse because it doesn't convert back the result to a string. – ayaio Mar 30 at 21:33
  • but it doesnt have to thats for the person to decide what they want to do with the result – bibble triple Mar 30 at 21:49
  • I understand what you say. But the second part of my comment was just an addition to the first part, which was the real important part: this solution has already been given in other answers. Please don't post what has already been posted. Don't post duplicate content, that's all I'm saying. puts each letters of your string into arrrays is already the solution given by Sreekanth G and others. Literally the same. – ayaio Mar 30 at 21:52

protected by Leo Dabus Sep 17 '16 at 4:42

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