my-fish-script a b c d

Say you want to get the all arguments from the second argument onwards, so b c d.

In bash you can use shift to dump the first argument and access the remaining ones with "$@".

How would you solve the problem using the fish shell?

up vote 41 down vote accepted

In fish, your arguments are contained in the $argv list. Use list slicing to access a range of elements, e.g. $argv[2..-1] returns all arguments from the second to the last.

For example

function loop --description "loop <count> <command>"
  for i in (seq 1 $argv[1])
    eval $argv[2..-1]
  end
end

Usage

$ loop 3 echo hello world
hello world
hello world
hello world
  • 2
    @AliGajani I did. It's a question I had that I couldn't find the answer to on SO, so I'm adding it now to help others. In fact, SO encourages you to answer your own questions. – Dennis Jun 7 '14 at 4:36
  • welp the comment-ificition strips out all the whitespace making it unreadable... how are you supposed to... whatever, here. so you can't just use set argv $argv[2..-1] as a direct translation from bash, i mean. so i guess you're supposed to translate the logic to something different in "idiomatic fish"? unless there's some built-in function that actually has the same behavior? – Owen_R Dec 29 '15 at 2:53
  • 1
    and how do you get the $0 argument (the script's name)? status -f? – xealits Oct 16 '16 at 3:17
  • 1
    @xealits see stackoverflow.com/questions/16975804/… – Dennis Oct 22 '16 at 17:36
  • 1
    keep in mind that indexes start at 1, i.e. $argv[1] – max pleaner Jan 19 '17 at 17:08

The behaviour of the shift command can be simulated with set -e/--erase VARIABLE_NAME.

The idea is to erase the first argument, then get the remaining arguments from the $argv list.

For example

function loop  --description "loop <count> <command>"
  set count $argv[1]
  set --erase argv[1]
  for i in (seq 1 $count)
    eval $argv
  end
end

Usage

$ loop 3 echo hello world
hello world
hello world
hello world

You could also use read which is more readable in my opinion:

function loop
  echo $argv | read -l count command
  for i in (seq 1 $count)
    eval $command
  end
end

This works better especially when you want to use more than the first argument.

echo $argv | read -l first second rest
  • @readers, ... | read -l ... performs pattern matching over it's input to set the given variable names. This won't work if the firsts argv value contain space -- not a risk here. – loxaxs Apr 20 at 5:46

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