72

I'm having a brain cramp... how do I initialize an array of objects properly in C++?

non-array example:

struct Foo { Foo(int x) { /* ... */  } };

struct Bar { 
     Foo foo;

     Bar() : foo(4) {}
};

array example:

struct Foo { Foo(int x) { /* ... */  } };

struct Baz { 
     Foo foo[3];

     // ??? I know the following syntax is wrong, but what's correct?
     Baz() : foo[0](4), foo[1](5), foo[2](6) {}
};

edit: Wild & crazy workaround ideas are appreciated, but they won't help me in my case. I'm working on an embedded processor where std::vector and other STL constructs are not available, and the obvious workaround is to make a default constructor and have an explicit init() method that can be called after construction-time, so that I don't have to use initializers at all. (This is one of those cases where I've gotten spoiled by Java's final keyword + flexibility with constructors.)

7
  • 5
    (access keywords left off for pedagogical simplicity)
    – Jason S
    Mar 9, 2010 at 14:55
  • 9
    Wouldn't it be easier to use struct in place of class for pedagogical simplicity? I find code that compiles easier to learn from ;-) Mar 9, 2010 at 14:57
  • 4
    When I copied your code in to my compiler I had to add what you left out. So for pedagogical simplicity you might consider not making it difficult for people to help you in the future. Mar 9, 2010 at 15:02
  • 1
    Steve/John: true on both counts. mea culpa.
    – Jason S
    Mar 9, 2010 at 15:04
  • 1
    @Jason: Get one, it's invaluable. You can also use codepad.org for code similar to this.
    – Roger Pate
    Mar 11, 2010 at 13:51

14 Answers 14

56

There is no way. You need a default constructor for array members and it will be called, afterwards, you can do any initialization you want in the constructor.

2
  • 8
    Unfortunately, you're right. +1 Note that C++1x' unified initialization syntax will allow you to do this.
    – sbi
    Mar 9, 2010 at 14:51
  • @sbi Unless the required constructor is marked explicit
    – user877329
    Feb 13, 2016 at 15:51
42

Just to update this question for C++11, this is now both possible to do and very natural:

struct Foo { Foo(int x) { /* ... */  } };

struct Baz { 
     Foo foo[3];

     Baz() : foo{{4}, {5}, {6}} { }
};

Those braces can also be elided for an even more concise:

struct Baz { 
     Foo foo[3];

     Baz() : foo{4, 5, 6} { }
};

Which can easily be extended to multi-dimensional arrays too:

struct Baz {
    Foo foo[3][2];

    Baz() : foo{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6} { }
};
4
  • Is there a nice way to initialize Foo foo[3][2];?
    – dshin
    Jun 26, 2015 at 22:39
  • 3
    @dshin Same way. Most braced: : foo{{{1}, {2}}, {{3}, {4}}, {{5}, {6}}}, or less braced foo{{1, 2}, {3, 4}, {5, 6}}, or least braced foo{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}.
    – Barry
    Jun 27, 2015 at 2:14
  • 3
    Is there a workaround when Foo's constructor is declared explicit?
    – dshin
    Jan 5, 2016 at 21:40
  • Can this be done with arrays of objects with this syntax as well? Mar 28 at 20:24
16

Right now, you can't use the initializer list for array members. You're stuck doing it the hard way.

class Baz {
    Foo foo[3];

    Baz() {
        foo[0] = Foo(4);
        foo[1] = Foo(5);
        foo[2] = Foo(6);
    }
};

In C++0x you can write:

class Baz {
    Foo foo[3];

    Baz() : foo({4, 5, 6}) {}
};
2
  • A one argument constructor will be called for an int unless you declare the constructor explicit.
    – jmanning2k
    Mar 9, 2010 at 15:58
  • interesting... I probably should have used something besides int then in my example, as it's too "easy" to deal with. :-)
    – Jason S
    Mar 9, 2010 at 16:10
7

Unfortunately there is no way to initialize array members till C++0x.

You could use a std::vector and push_back the Foo instances in the constructor body.

You could give Foo a default constructor (might be private and making Baz a friend).

You could use an array object that is copyable (boost or std::tr1) and initialize from a static array:

#include <boost/array.hpp>

struct Baz {

    boost::array<Foo, 3> foo;
    static boost::array<Foo, 3> initFoo;
    Baz() : foo(initFoo)
    {

    }
};

boost::array<Foo, 3> Baz::initFoo = { 4, 5, 6 };
2
  • +1. Wondered why noone came up with this, until i saw your answer. array is trivial to implement, and it's neither wild nor crazy. You could write a function like array<Foo, 3> create() { array<Foo, 3> a = { ... }; return a; } to avoid the static variable, too. Mar 9, 2010 at 18:10
  • Seems obvious to me too, even if the support for templates is weak on the target compiler (no std::vector seems fishy) a generation approach would work (preprocessor or script generating necessary classes). Mar 9, 2010 at 20:23
3

You can use C++0x auto keyword together with template specialization on for example a function named boost::make_array() (similar to make_pair()). For the case of where N is either 1 or 2 arguments we can then write variant A as

namespace boost
{
/*! Construct Array from @p a. */
template <typename T>
boost::array<T,1> make_array(const T & a)
{
    return boost::array<T,2> ({{ a }});
}
/*! Construct Array from @p a, @p b. */
template <typename T>
boost::array<T,2> make_array(const T & a, const T & b)
{
    return boost::array<T,2> ({{ a, b }});
}
}

and variant B as

namespace boost {
/*! Construct Array from @p a. */
template <typename T>
boost::array<T,1> make_array(const T & a)
{
    boost::array<T,1> x;
    x[0] = a;
    return x;
}
/*! Construct Array from @p a, @p b. */
template <typename T>
boost::array<T,2> make_array(const T & a, const T & b)
{
    boost::array<T,2> x;
    x[0] = a;
    x[1] = b;
    return x;
}
}

GCC-4.6 with -std=gnu++0x and -O3 generates the exact same binary code for

auto x = boost::make_array(1,2);

using both A and B as it does for

boost::array<int, 2> x = {{1,2}};

For user defined types (UDT), though, variant B results in an extra copy constructor, which usually slow things down, and should therefore be avoided.

Note that boost::make_array errors when calling it with explicit char array literals as in the following case

auto x = boost::make_array("a","b");

I believe this is a good thing as const char* literals can be deceptive in their use.

Variadic templates, available in GCC since 4.5, can further be used reduce all template specialization boiler-plate code for each N into a single template definition of boost::make_array() defined as

/*! Construct Array from @p a, @p b. */
template <typename T, typename ... R>
boost::array<T,1+sizeof...(R)> make_array(T a, const R & ... b)
{
    return boost::array<T,1+sizeof...(R)>({{ a, b... }});
}

This works pretty much as we expect. The first argument determines boost::array template argument T and all other arguments gets converted into T. For some cases this may undesirable, but I'm not sure how if this is possible to specify using variadic templates.

Perhaps boost::make_array() should go into the Boost Libraries?

1
  • thanks but C++0x isn't available on low-end embedded processors (C++ compilers are hard enough to find)
    – Jason S
    Jun 15, 2011 at 12:10
2

This seems to work, but I'm not convinced it's right:

#include <iostream>

struct Foo { int x; Foo(int x): x(x) { } };

struct Baz { 
     Foo foo[3];

    static int bar[3];
     // Hmm...
     Baz() : foo(bar) {}
};

int Baz::bar[3] = {4, 5, 6};

int main() {
    Baz z;
    std::cout << z.foo[1].x << "\n";
}

Output:

$ make arrayinit -B CXXFLAGS=-pedantic && ./arrayinit
g++ -pedantic    arrayinit.cpp   -o arrayinit
5

Caveat emptor.

Edit: nope, Comeau rejects it.

Another edit: This is kind of cheating, it just pushes the member-by-member array initialization to a different place. So it still requires Foo to have a default constructor, but if you don't have std::vector then you can implement for yourself the absolute bare minimum you need:

#include <iostream>

struct Foo { 
    int x; 
    Foo(int x): x(x) { }; 
    Foo(){}
};

// very stripped-down replacement for vector
struct Three { 
    Foo data[3]; 
    Three(int d0, int d1, int d2) {
        data[0] = d0;
        data[1] = d1;
        data[2] = d2;
    }
    Foo &operator[](int idx) { return data[idx]; }
    const Foo &operator[](int idx) const { return data[idx]; }
};

struct Baz { 
    Three foo;

    static Three bar;
    // construct foo using the copy ctor of Three with bar as parameter.
    Baz() : foo(bar) {}
    // or get rid of "bar" entirely and do this
    Baz(bool) : foo(4,5,6) {}
};

Three Baz::bar(4,5,6);

int main() {
    Baz z;
    std::cout << z.foo[1].x << "\n";
}

z.foo isn't actually an array, but it looks about as much like one as a vector does. Adding begin() and end() functions to Three is trivial.

1
  • ...and this gives me some ideas that might work for my situation more cleanly than what I have. thanks!
    – Jason S
    Mar 9, 2010 at 16:11
1

Only the default constructor can be called when creating objects in an array.

1

In the specific case when the array is a data member of the class you can't initialize it in the current version of the language. There's no syntax for that. Either provide a default constructor for array elements or use std::vector.

A standalone array can be initialized with aggregate initializer

Foo foo[3] = { 4, 5, 6 };

but unfortunately there's no corresponding syntax for the constructor initializer list.

0

There is no array-construction syntax that ca be used in this context, at least not directly. You can accomplish what you're trying to accomplish by something along the lines of:

Bar::Bar()
{
    static const int inits [] = {4,5,6};
    static const size_t numInits = sizeof(inits)/sizeof(inits[0]);
    std::copy(&inits[0],&inits[numInits],foo);  // be careful that there are enough slots in foo
}

...but you'll need to give Foo a default constructor.

0

Ideas from a twisted mind :

class mytwistedclass{
static std::vector<int> initVector;
mytwistedclass()
{
    //initialise with initVector[0] and then delete it :-)
}

};

now set this initVector to something u want to before u instantiate an object. Then your objects are initialized with your parameters.

0

You can do it, but it's not pretty:

#include <iostream>

class A {
    int mvalue;
public:
    A(int value) : mvalue(value) {}
    int value() { return mvalue; }
};

class B {
    // TODO: hack that respects alignment of A.. maybe C++14's alignof?
    char _hack[sizeof(A[3])];
    A* marr;
public:
    B() : marr(reinterpret_cast<A*>(_hack)) {
        new (&marr[0]) A(5);
        new (&marr[1]) A(6);
        new (&marr[2]) A(7);
    }

    A* arr() { return marr; }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    B b;
    A* arr = b.arr();
    std::cout << arr[0].value() << " " << arr[1].value() << " " << arr[2].value() << "\n";
    return 0;
}

If you put this in your code, I hope you have a VERY good reason.

0

This is my solution for your reference:

struct Foo
{
    Foo(){}//used to make compiler happy!
    Foo(int x){/*...*/}
};

struct Bar
{
    Foo foo[3];

    Bar()
    {
        //initialize foo array here:
        for(int i=0;i<3;++i)
        {
            foo[i]=Foo(4+i);
        }
    }
};
-1

in visual studio 2012 or above, you can do like this

struct Foo { Foo(int x) { /* ... */  } };

struct Baz { 
     Foo foo[3];

     Baz() : foo() { }
};
-2
class C
{
   static const int myARRAY[10];  // only declaration !!!

   public:
   C(){}
   }

const int C::myARRAY[10]={0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};  // here is definition

int main(void)
{
   C myObj;
   }

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