9

How might I get the count of items returned by io/ioutil.ReadDir()?

I have this code, which works, but I have to think isn't the RightWay(tm) in Go.

package main

import "io/ioutil"
import "fmt"

func main() {
    files,_ := ioutil.ReadDir("/Users/dgolliher/Dropbox/INBOX")
    var count int
    for _, f := range files {
        fmt.Println(f.Name())
        count++
    }
    fmt.Println(count)
}

Lines 8-12 seem like way too much to go through to just count the results of ReadDir, but I can't find the correct syntax to get the count without iterating over the range. Help?

2
  • If you are strictly looking for a count, you should look at using File.Readdirnames. This avoids collecting the information on every file. Walking the files (filepath.Walk) would have presumably been even more efficient, but underlying that is also Readdirnames. Commented Oct 15, 2015 at 3:57
  • Thanks for the tip. In the application I developed, I wouldl expect a trivial optimization from changing my implementation at this point. I'll file this suggestion away for next time!
    – golliher
    Commented Oct 15, 2015 at 14:22

5 Answers 5

20

Found the answer in http://blog.golang.org/go-slices-usage-and-internals

package main

import "io/ioutil"
import "fmt"

func main() {
    files,_ := ioutil.ReadDir("/Users/dgolliher/Dropbox/INBOX")
    fmt.Println(len(files))
}
2
  • Both ioutil.ReadDir and os.ReadDir do sorting which we don't need. Also ioutil.ReadDir is deprecated for some reason. We better off calling os.Open then f.Readdirnames(-1). I have posted a complete example as an answer.
    – saeedgnu
    Commented Sep 24, 2022 at 12:15
  • Deprecated pkg.go.dev/io/[email protected]#ReadDir
    – Seyhak Ly
    Commented Mar 19 at 20:48
8

ReadDir returns a list of directory entries sorted by filename, so it is not just files. Here is a little function for those wanting to get a count of files only (and not dirs):

func fileCount(path string) (int, error){
    i := 0
    files, err := ioutil.ReadDir(path)
    if err != nil {
        return 0, err
    }
    for _, file := range files {
        if !file.IsDir() { 
            i++
        }
    }
    return i, nil
}
1
  • Both ioutil.ReadDir and os.ReadDir do sorting which we don't need. Also ioutil.ReadDir is deprecated for some reason. We better off calling os.Open then f.Readdirnames(-1). I have posted a complete example as an answer.
    – saeedgnu
    Commented Sep 24, 2022 at 12:16
8

Starting with Go 1.16 (Feb 2021), a better option is os.ReadDir:

package main
import "os"

func main() {
   d, e := os.ReadDir(".")
   if e != nil {
      panic(e)
   }
   println(len(d))
}

os.ReadDir returns fs.DirEntry instead of fs.FileInfo, which means that Size and ModTime methods are omitted, making the process more efficient if you just need an entry count.

https://golang.org/pkg/os#ReadDir

0

If you wanna get all files (not recursive) you can use len(files). If you need to just get the files without folders and hidden files just loop over them and increase a counter. And please don’t ignore errors

0

By looking at the code of ioutil.ReadDir

func ReadDir(dirname string) ([]fs.FileInfo, error) {
    f, err := os.Open(dirname)
    if err != nil {
        return nil, err
    }
    list, err := f.Readdir(-1)
    f.Close()
    if err != nil {
        return nil, err
    }
    sort.Slice(list, func(i, j int) bool { return list[i].Name() < list[j].Name() })
    return list, nil
}

you would realize that it calls os.File.Readdir() then sorts the files.

In case of counting it, you don't need to sort, so you are better off calling os.File.Readdir() directly. You can simply copy and paste this function then remove the sort. But I did find out that f.Readdirnames(-1) is much faster than f.Readdir(-1). Running time is almost half for /usr/bin/ with 2808 items (16ms vs 35ms). So to summerize it in an example:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    f, err := os.Open(os.Args[1])
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    list, err := f.Readdirnames(-1)
    f.Close()
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    fmt.Println(len(list))
}
1
  • 1
    This is the best answer in terms of efficiency; not sure why it was being downvoted.
    – Matt
    Commented Jun 11 at 17:49

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