55

I recently started working with ReactJS. Specifically, I am utilizing the react-rails ruby gem and react-bootstrap components.

I have a question regarding placing onClick event listeners in child components.

As you can see from the code sample below, I have a parent component that 'calls' a child component in its render function. Within that render function, I have React onClick listener that calls handleToggle when it is clicked.

###* @jsx React.DOM ###

ToggleIconButton = React.createClass
  getInitialState: ->
    toggleOn: false
  handleToggle: (evt) ->
    this.setState(toggleOn: !this.state.toggleOn)
  render: ->
    `<IconButton onClick={this.handleToggle}>Toggle Button</IconButton>`

IconButton = React.createClass
  render: ->
    # BsButton and BsGlyphicon are React-Bootstrap components
    `<BsButton>
      <BsGlyphicon glyph={this.props.glyph} />
      {" " + this.props.text}
     </BsButton>`

Unfortunately, this doesn't work the way I thought it would. ToggleIconButton::handleToggle never gets called. Instead, the onClick listener is placed on IconButton and references ToggleIconButton::handleToggle.

React Dev Tool Screen


I don't want to add any additional behavior to IconButton. The way I see it, no conditional logic should be placed in IconButton. All it should do is represent an icon and button and not have to worry about any browser events. That's what ToggleIconButton is for.

While I know I could wrap a React Div around IconButton and write an onClick listener there (I've tried this and it works), it seems like that's a bit janky.

Does anybody know a good way of doing this? Thanks guys!

80

So, the proper way to handle eventing in this case would be to pass the event handler down to the child component. There are a few ways to accomplish what you want, and I might implement this behavior differently (not sure what the use case is), but I wired up an example in JSX for you that demonstrates the typical event handling between Parent and Child Components. You can find it here...

JS Fiddle

Just think of it like this:

var ParentComponent = React.createClass({
    render: function(){
        return (
            <ChildComponent onSomeEvent={this.handleThatEvent} />;
        )
    },
    handleThatEvent: function(e){
         //update state, etc.
    }
});

var ChildComponent = React.createClass({
    render: function(){
        return (
           <input type="button" onClick={this.props.onSomeEvent} value="Click Me!" />
        )
    }
});
  • 3
    Thanks cap. As you can see from the original post, I do indeed have ReactJS dev tools installed :). While I understand that within my child component I can add an onClick listener that will call a function from the child's props, it seems like I shouldn't have to do this... what if the child component shouldn't necessarily have an onClick listener in other contexts? What if I want to use this component within a different parent component but not have an onClick listener? Doesn't this harm the reusability of a component? Let me know if this doesn't make sense. – Kurt Mueller Jun 10 '14 at 0:41
  • 7
    You are correct sir, I glossed right over that :) So, what you could do, is wrap that component in a div, and register the onClick for that div to get the functionality you want without polluting the ChildComponent with that behavior. Something like <div onClick={this.handleToggle}> <ChildComponent /> </div> – captray Jun 10 '14 at 1:12
  • 4
    Also, without clearly passing that event to the ChildComponent, you can't exactly call onClick on it, since the Component itself isn't really an HTML element, so onClick isn't defined for it. – captray Jun 10 '14 at 1:19
  • Thanks! Save my day! :D Needless to say, one must take care of binding the parent component for correct scope & behaviour. – Viet Aug 21 '16 at 8:55
  • 1
    Wow, Thank you! It is really helpful :) – the1900 Jul 28 '17 at 14:53
9

You don't need to make a child component if before you call the node you create a var to reference the render's this i.e.

var self = this;

So for example (this is contrived and the var self isn't needed in this case, but in the case of nested return statements it would be required).

var ParentComponent = React.createClass({
    render: function(){
        var self = this;
        return (
            <input type="button" onClick={self.handleThatEvent} value="Click Me!" />;
        )
    },
    handleThatEvent: function(e){
         //update state, etc.
    }
});

Better yet, you could bind this to the function.

var ParentComponent = React.createClass({
    render: function(){
        return (
            this.state.array.map(function(){
              return (<input type="button" onClick={this.handleThatEvent} value="Click Me!" />);
            }.bind(this));
        )
    },
    handleThatEvent: function(e){
         //update state, etc.
    }
});

Or to follow captray's suggestion in the comments

var ParentComponent = React.createClass({
    render: function(){
        return (
            this.state.array.map(function(){
              return (<input type="button" onClick={this.handleThatEvent} value="Click Me!" />);
            }, this);
        )
    },
    handleThatEvent: function(e){
         //update state, etc.
    }
});
  • What scope does the handleThatEvent have? Will it have the childs props or the parents props? – Ray Suelzer Mar 13 '15 at 19:21
  • 1
    Try it and see. But it would be the parents, as per the binding. – Matt Styles Mar 18 '15 at 8:46
  • 1
    great, thanks this solution works when you have multiple returns(3 in my case) – jycr753 Jul 26 '15 at 16:55
  • 2
    Just a heads up, for those looking to use bind in this scenario... Many of the functional calls like map and filter accept a second parameter, which does the same thing as bind, it sets the execution context to what is passed in, so you can just call .map(function(item) { //do stuff }, this); – captray Aug 31 '15 at 23:06
  • 1
    This is great! I am new to React and was just refactoring my app to be simpler and more elegant ... spent a day trying to figure out why some nested child^parent calls were broken. This (no pun intended) fixed everything! – Kirill Oct 15 '15 at 4:30

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